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Crab stock, does it really have that much flavor?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Crab stock, does it really have that much flavor?

On the food network, they showed a guy who says he makes crabstock by boiling the shells in water for a few hours, how much flavor is that actually going to have?

Should you add clam broth like you do when making lobster stock?

TIA :D
post #2 of 10
It can have great flavor but in all instance I have made it it was simmered (not boiled) for about 30 minutes.

First crack them up a bit and rinse in cold water if there is any gunk hanging on to it.

Melt some butter in the bottom of your pan sautee the broken shells for a few minutes. Deglaze with wine add (as you want, you don't need it all, but include one acid) onion, parsley stems, thyme, white wine, lemon juice, COLD water, Bring to a boil then simmer for

Ok this is more like a fumet but there will be flavor.

BUT this isn't what I would I would use the shells for. Any place you would use it can probably be substituted or fish stock and price per flavor is a better deal.

I prefer to make crab butter.

Take cooked shells, break up a bit, put in a mixer with Cold butter, (add any roe if you have it) and mix slowly (go slowly or your wall will be decorated with crab bits). Mix until broken up and well mixed with the butter.

Let sit overnight. The next day SLOWLY melt the butter (clarify it), strain out the shells. Let clarified butter cool. then spread on toast or on pasta, or finish soups with, or spread it on crab.

Enjoy!
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Willie Nelson
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post #3 of 10
I've never made crab stock, but for various recipes involving shrimp I have often made stock when using shell-on shrimp. The flavor is fairly light but makes a noticeable difference in the finished product. Well, when making soups and sauces and such - grilled shrimp on a salad doesn't really count, in cases like that the shells get tossed.

Crab shells may have more flavor, I'll have to try the crab butter. I could see crab meat and crab butter being involved in a rich and luxurious sunday brunch omelette...

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Good idea, this guy was making a crab bisque, but it would probably turn out better, if you made crab butter and used that for the roux, and then a fish stock, instead of the crab stock.
post #5 of 10
Depending on kind of fish? Some fish especially high oil or fat content fish will overpower the crab stock to a great degree. I tried this and it does not work. You are better off with shrimp, clam or lobster shells.
CHEFED
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post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Ah, good tip there, shrimp shells would probably work the best.
post #7 of 10
I used to make crab and lobster stock 3 times a week and always got a good strong flavor.

Crab shells or Lobster bodies with all the gunk(gunk is flavor if you wash them your flavor goes down the drain).
Mirepoix
Thyme sprigs
Pat of butter

Sautee the shells until bright red, add the Mirepoix and cook over medium heat until soft but not brown

Add Thyme sprigs and cold water and bring to a boil over medium heat. Once at a boil simmer for 30-45 minutes over low heat.

Strain thru a Chinois and a a coffee filter or cheesecloth.

For a Bisque replace half the water with cream and reduce to desired viscostiy.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #8 of 10

crab stock has very strong flavour if made correctly.

 

i start by roasting the shells in an oven rather than in a pan.

then sweat down your miripoix with red chillies, red peppers, ginger, fennel and an orange.

deglaze with white wine, vermouth and brandy, add cold water and tomato paste and simmer very gently for a few hours.

if you have any fish bones such as halibut of monkfish or skate soak them for an hour in water to remove any blood

and add to the stock for the last 20 mins.

make a bouquet garni with star anise, coriander seeds, caraway seeds, fennel seeds or anything aromatic you can find and leave to infuse over night

i use this stock to make amazing risottos or reduce it by 90% and finish with cream for a rich sauce.

 

or if you really want to go crazy you can then cook crabs in the stock rather than in court boullion and get extra crab flavoured crabs and the stock will get stronger 

 

post #9 of 10

Although you can't do this home it comes out great.  Fill a 10 gal stockpot with lobster ,shrimp and crab shells(about 20 lobster carcasses) fill 3/4 with water and mirepoix, and herbs  simmmer all day and strain at least twice you wind up with about 1 gal of stock extremely  strong.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #10 of 10

Crab stock and Fish stock are definitely two different things. The best fish stocks should retain a fresh ocean smell vs a fishy smell.  So after you bring fish stock to a boil. Turn it down to a simmer but only for a short time.

 

Crab stocks / lobster stocks / shrimp stocks should be given time to bring its flavor and perfume to a complimenting mire poix, but you have to keep an eye on the caramelizing from the vegetables, etc. on the stove. You can extend the caramelizing time with very small amounts of water to prevent burning. I usually deglaze with white wine to "a sec" (almost dry) before adding water/chicken stock etc. to attain the level of flavor I am looking for. Bring stock to a boil then simmer will give you a clear pleasant tasting stock.

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