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fried mashed potato

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
from time to time we have left over mashed potatoes.

I do mashed using russets - about 1 tsp butter per serving - whipped - milk added as needed for consistency.

a tasty left over treatment is fried mashed potato patties. see the pix linked.
http://i490.photobucket.com/albums/r...D/DSCF2064.jpg
http://i490.photobucket.com/albums/r...D/DSCF2065.jpg

the problem:
getting the patties done "right" is a touchy and time consuming process.
see the "done" photo - patty on the right has a slightly folded top where is was just firm enough to move when jiggled but soupy enough to "wrinkle" when flipped.

the major trick is to make the patty, plunk it in medium pan, and don't touch anything for like 15 minutes; flip and do another 10-15 minutes.
the heat has to be right - enough to brown, not so hot it burns.
and heat level depends on how "wet" the mashed were to start - and "wet" appears to be a combined function of water moisture and fat content.
I've had mashed patties essentially "melt away" in the pan.
once I made "mashed potato balls" for deep frying; wound up with a deep layer of potato sediment in the fryer and _nothing_ left to eat . . .

has anyone tried this "dish"?

any tips on making it less "touchy" to produce?
post #2 of 22
My mom made these all the time.

I made some this week as well for the first time in a long time.

To about 3 cups of cold mashed potatoes, Add an egg, more black pepper/hot sauce, thinly sliced green onions (white and green parts). Adjust firmness of the mashed potato with some instant potato flakes (preferred) or flour.

A little panko or other crumbs to coat and into a cast iron pan greased with melted butter. Quite tasty actually

It would be good to do to sweet potatos but spice it up with some hot peppers/cajun seasoning.
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post #3 of 22
I make it all the time. Use an egg or two(depends on how much mashed potato), grated onion, S&P. Add just enough egg for a semi dry consistency. Pan fry or bake in muffin pans for a different look. Cheddar goes good with this also.
post #4 of 22
Yeah an egg will help, you could also add, onions, leeks or cabbage.
post #5 of 22
It might work well if you refrigerate the mashed potatoes overnight. It will help keep their shape and they will warm through nicely I hypothesize.

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post #6 of 22
I like to add the suggested egg and spices such as the s&p,garlic,green onion,some baby shrimp,and bread in panko. Deep frying is my favorite,but pan frying is just as yummy. I usually dip in a honey mustard. Ranch is good too.
post #7 of 22
These are fried mash potatoes. We used left over mash from night before. Formed them into a pear shape flour, egg wash, and seasoned bread crumbs them deep fry till golden brown, heat in oven as needed, used a clove for stem, taisted awsome.
When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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post #8 of 22
Dillbert, Yours look pretty good in the pix. Like I said in my earlier post, I'd firm up the mix with some instant potato flakes or flour. And bread them, that will help the surface texture too.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 22
Try a little flour as well, an egg will help but if they are "melting" away the flour will help with body and consistency.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #10 of 22
Here in the UK it is common to use leftover mashed potatoes and any greens (eg cabbage, spring greens etc) in Bubble and Squeak. But B&S is usually made in one large 'cake'.

Mix cold mashed potatoes with the left over greens (I also grate a small onion into the mixture) - heat a spoonful of sunflower oil in the base of a large frying pan. Put all the cold foods into the pan - smoosh it down until it fills the bottom of the frying pan. Cook until cooked on one side - flip (I use a dinner sized plate to turn the mixture) - being careful not to break the large disc - cook on the othe sider until golden.

PS Legend has it that the dish is called bubble and squeak because that's exactly what it does whilst being cooked. :p
post #11 of 22
Bubbles and Squeak, I love it! My friend who was from the UK had a different story on why it's called bubbles and squeak. According to him, "you know when your mum had left overs in the fridge, that have been there too long? They first start to form bubbles and when they get really ripe they even start to squeak. Instead of throwing them away, mum used to cover it with mashed potatoes and bake it into a pie. That's why we call it bubbles and squeak."

I'm not from the UK, but I thought it was a funny story all the same. The fact of the matter is, bubbles and squeak is a great way to utilize left overs; I'm a huge fan.
post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
thanks all! some interesting ideas for added flavors, etc.

I take it the egg acts as a binder - I take it the mashed need to warm up a bit in order to incorporate (beaten?) egg? do you then chill after forming the patty / shape?

I've often been tempted to add some flour but thought it would just have a raw floury taste,,, I'll give it a go - I don't "stock" instant potato so I might wind up just feeding the mealy bugs with that - as much as I would use....

the fried pears are wild! that's imagination!

the times I tried deep frying the potato just 'dissolved' - I am working with cold left over mashed - as they warm through the consistency loosens and that's where I get in trouble.
I also bread a lot of stuff in panko; one more breaded thing and I'm likely to be wearing the frying pan on my head <g> - but I've got to try it. when the (preferred) plan all comes together, the patties have a french fry like crispy crust and hot mashed inside - the breaded will obviously change that but heh, why not?
post #13 of 22
These are called Pear William and are used at a lot of Banquets because they are preped before and are handled very easily for plateing. It is almost a Duchess mix made from cold mashed with eggs, sauteed onion, nutmeg s&p dredged in seasoned flour ,egg and crumbs. It makes a nice presentation on the plate.:lips:
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post #14 of 22
Ed u nailed it, left over dutches, exactly. Im going to try this week to shape them into Quinces the name of the Bistro working @ is called Quince Bistro. maybe a nice piece of fries sage for leaf on top, like i saw on a poached pear picture on this site

By the way who ever took that picture, for wwhat its worth it is my favorite food photo ever, Foodnphoto maybe?
When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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post #15 of 22
Italians make potato croquettes and it's one of the traditional "fast foods" you get at a frying or pizza stand, along with squares of pizza and rice croquettes.
They always are made with lots of parmigiano grated inside, along with an egg. I often grate an onion. Then flour, dip in egg and dip in breadcrumbs before frying. Oh, yes, and mashed potatoes here always have nutmeg besides parmigiano
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #16 of 22
Here in US we make a concoction called Italian Rice Balls, which is cooked seasoned rice and reggiano rolled around seasoned meat then breaded and fried . They sell well and can be used as appi or entree. Have also made minis for Hors D Ourves. :)
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post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 
okay - not sure how the rice balls got in here,,, but anywhey -

tried the "egg in the mashed potato" route.
ah,,,,,, not so happy there.

egg + schufft + mashed potato + fry pan = <dish>
actually tasty, but not the dish I was after.
not that it's "bad" - but just not "the dish"

two problems I observed:

taste change - the egg definitely affects taste. I prefer the crisp non-adulterated "french fry" pancake taste - nice crust, soft sweet gooey mashed potato inside.

texture change - the whole thing cooked up more like a soft curd french omelet (oops, that got browned...) - or perhaps the same browning gooples as for example a fritata surface texture.

the duchess potato bend to the discussion is valid - without a doubt piped or molded, it's a good thing - just different from what I went looking for.
as a big "twice baked potato" fan - that direction of ingredient/prep/execution is right down my alley, but not so far as my "fried mashed" goes.
post #18 of 22
Use less egg and the taste and texture will be more potato like. Sour cream or milk may work as an egg replacement but I have never tried it. Basically anything to make the potatoes a bit wetter will work. I have left out the egg and used grated onions with the juice but it adds a LOT of onion flavor.
post #19 of 22
The addition of more liquid to potato will make it fall apart even more-so as you are diluting the starch content of the potato. You might want to try some egg beaters if you dont like egg, but in order to really hold together for service NEATLY the potato needs some sought of binder. For home cooks it may work, but in a commercial setting without egg, it is to delicate and fragile to handle. :look:
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post #20 of 22
When do u add the egg to the mix.
When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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When I stop loving what I do, I will do something else: Clint Eastwood http://NewDreamCatering.comCharleston, SC
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post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
the egg taste is okay - but it's like having your mouth at set for a hot dog and getting a turkey dog. the turkey dog is not bad, it's just not what you wanted <g>

the original question involved leftover mash potatoes - and this is a home setting - if I were making up a batch from scratch with the fried patty intent there probably more options.
post #22 of 22
If you are useing leftover mashed , mix it into it, If you are making new just add it to it while mixing, like duchess mix. :talk:
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