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wild mushroom sauce?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I was wondering if anyone has a good recipe for a wild mushroom sauce. I am looking for something that will go well with hanger steak. I do have veal glace that I can use if that helps.
post #2 of 12
When I do mushrooms with beef I usually do one of three things. Brown them in butter and leave it at that. Or brown them in butter, deglaze with beef broth ( typically unsalted homemade ) and a splash of sherry, a thin but flavorful sauce. A couple more pats of butter swirled in when off the heat might thicken it a bit. Or brown them in butter ( what a surprise! ) and make a seperate pot of beef gravy, then add the shrooms to the gravy. It depends on what the mushrooms are destined to garnish, how it was prepared, other sides and such. But I try to keep it fairly simple and not pile too much seasoning in, preferring to let the flavor of the mushrooms stand on its own, especially when using wild ones.

The last time I did pan seared steaks I seared them in cast iron then transferred to another pan for the oven finish. Added some butter to the cast iron pan, sauted the shrooms over a medium flame, did the deglaze with broth and sherry, picking up the fond from the steaks. Topped the rested steaks with the shrooms, served with beet greens sauted with bacon and onion. Good stuff.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #3 of 12
If they are dried I would soak them in beef stock. Once they have reconstituted I would remove them and chop. Drain the stock through a paper towel to catch any grit and add it to the pan to reduce along with the mushrooms so they cook through. Before reducing you could saute onion/shallot/garlic/whatever if you want it then add the stock. Finish it off the heat with butter and serve. I use that with some cream added as a gravy for country fried steak.
post #4 of 12
Homemade or commercial glace?Actual glace consistency, or demi-glace?

Do you want to build the sauce on a red wine, sherry, madeira, port or cognac base?

Cream or no cream?

If you're an accomplished sauce maker, from my questions, my thinking should be pretty clear to you and you can probably build anything as well as I can. On the other hand, if this is all Greek to you, let's put together the sauce you want.

Shall we? Let's shall!
BDL
post #5 of 12
what wild shrooms? not all mushrooms are the same
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #6 of 12
Full Glace or Demi Glace? As stated earlier what mushrooms?

Here is a very basic sauce I make at home during the winter

In a cast Iron skillet I sear a steak and finish it in the oven. Remove from the oven and let the steak rest. IN the pan I sautee 1 shallot minced, 1 minced clove of garlic until just brown. Add the "Wild Mushrooms" and sautee until ALL the moisture has evaporated and the pan is dry. Deglaze with Red wine of choice and reduce by 75%. Add you Demi Glace and bring to a boil. I like to finish mine with a about a 1/4 cup of cream, season with chopped Thyme, S&P and serve.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #7 of 12
whenever I hear the term "wild mushrooms", I think of a cartoon I once saw many years ago. There are two bins in the supermarket. One bin says "Wild Mushrooms - $5/lb", the other bin says "Wild Mushrooms? - $.05/lb".

The ideas above are all good. I pan sear the steaks 3 minutes to a side, and then pop into a 450 F oven for 8 minutes for medium rare tenderloins.

Then I tent the steaks on a plate, and then to the empty cast iron skillet, I add 2-3 TBSP unsalted butter, and as many shallots/scallions/red onion/leeks/yellow onion finely diced as I desire. Cook just a bit, and add the roughly chopped fresh mushrooms. I like baby bellas.

When they lose their water, and most of it evaporates, I deglaze with a dry white wine, like Dry Zack from Spain. Its aged 15 years.

Then I add the demi-glace, usually about 1 cup for 2-3 steaks.

I season the sauce with S&P, and sometimes add alittle heavy cream for a change of pace. I have used red wine on occasion instead of the dry white wine, but I like drinking red wine so much, I never have any lying around to use!

You could even spice up the sauce a little more by soaking your coarsely cracked black and/or green peppercorns in the heavy cream before adding, if you choose to add cream. Always reduce to desired consistency of the sauce.

Much more additions, and the sauce becomes too complicated/complex in flavor.

doc
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Well I thought most people knew what wild mushrooms were. When I said wild mushrooms I meant porcini,verpa morel, chanterels, black trumpet, lobsters... If I had said cultivated then I would have meant white trumpets, velvet pioppinis,maitakes, blue foots, and shiitakes.
post #9 of 12
I personally just wanted to be sure you were actually refering to true wild mushrooms.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #10 of 12
No Chuck not everyone (chef or not) knows the difference between: wild, cultivated, exotic etc......

maitake aka hen of the woods may be wild, especially this year.
ditto oysters, occasionally shittakes, woodears....

instead of wine, I prefer Makers Mark bourbon or Jack Black......many swear by a tiny touch of soy, probably more apt to use it with shittakes than the other varieties.
veal glace.

herb selection varies with shrooms, normally we use shallots instead of garlic
.....tarragon with chanterelles
thyme, maybe alittle rosemary and lemon with hen of the woods
black trumpets are so big, normally I let them stand on their own
morels, thyme or parsley.....usually I'll umph the flavor of fresh with dried
porcini....ditto morel info.

I've made grown foragers weep, by crumbling up dried morels to add to a sauce or soup.....it's hard for them to see their efforts smooshed.

So depending on your wild mix, an addition of dried may not hurt but enhance the pot....or may be unnecessary.
JMTC
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #11 of 12
I prefer dried shiitakes, morels and procini's over fresh. If I can find the dried trumpets I grab them and save them for a special occasion.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #12 of 12
When I was growing up, once a year, the whole family went into the woods around Maquoketa Iowa, and looked for mushrooms growing in the wild.

To me, these were wild mushrooms, and unless you knew what you were doing, you could end up sick or dead from them.

Some of the mushrooms that were labeled "wild" to me are more exotic mushrooms.

But then what do I know! :)

doc
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