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Why Checks?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
So, I understand the toque and cravat (neckerchief), and I get the clogs or steel-toes and the double breasted jacket, but why are the pants checkered? I mean, honestly, is there a point in having checkered or herringbone pants?
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post #2 of 9
breaks up and hides stains from drips and spills during the work shift.
I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
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post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Ok, that seems obvious... Why didn't I think of that?

But on the other hand, how high is your apron that you're getting things on your pants?
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post #4 of 9
They used checks before they had aprons IIRC
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
checks before aprons. got it. now it makes sense.

...

whats iirc? I may only be 23, but i dont know internet lingo very well. remember, im in a kitchen for 90% of my waking hours.
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post #6 of 9
If I Recall Correctly.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
got it. thanks.
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post #8 of 9
As a side note, prior to the mid-19th century, chefs wore gray. The gray outfits dated back to the 16th century when cooks were persecuted as intellectuals. Since cooks were considered learned men because many could read and write, (the better to practice their craft), their very learning and creativity made them suspect. Some people even accused them of being witches because they were "making potions." As you may know, witches were traditionally burned at the stake. The term witch was originally gender neutral.

Some cooks are said to have found refuge at various monastaries and are further said to have adopted the toque to mimic the hats worn by priests. Since priests wore black, cooks wore gray. Gray uniforms persisted until the mid-19th century when Chef Marie-Antoine Carême introduced some reforms. Chef Carême felt that white would be more appropriate (at least for highly visible chefs) because white denotes cleanliness. He subsequently introduced the white double breasted jacket because this jacket could be reversed to hide stains. He also introduced the use of different hats to denote various workstations and levels of professional seniority.
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
I had read somewhere that Escoffier actually introduced the double-breasted jacket to make it match the uniforms of the French Military. I don't remember what they said the reasoning behind the military style was.
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