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Light fluffy doughnuts

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I'm a pro at making old world breads but can someone please share with me the secret for making light fluffy doughnuts that don't chew like rubber the following day?

I'm guessing it's a flour secret. I have always used recipes that call for regular unbleached flour. From the texture I imagine regular flour must have too high a gluten content.

Suggestions please? I have thought about using cake flour, but am not certain if the measured quantity would be the same or even if this IS the problem.:confused:
Ron--WV--Funbilly
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Ron--WV--Funbilly
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post #2 of 28
I think most donut shops are using a mix for cake donuts. I have a formula for yeast raised that's pretty good, but donuts can be tricky. This particular dough is very touchy about temperature and proofing times. I looked forward to learning how to make donuts in school, but when the day came I just walked around the lab and rubbernecked. Thing about donut making is that I think you can always get a job doing it.
It's not Dairy Queen.
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It's not Dairy Queen.
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post #3 of 28
Thread Starter 

Big hat

I just want to make some doughnuts for friends and family. I'm disabled and can't get one of those doughnut making jobs:(
Ron--WV--Funbilly
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Ron--WV--Funbilly
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post #4 of 28
Making doughnuts....first their always best fresh and no matter what you do they'll be kind of stale the next day but they are do able.

For a yeast doughnuts look for a recipe from an Amish cookbook that uses potatos in the dough. Potato dough slows down the staling process and they taste great. Leave them on the counter over night. Do not refridgerate, that stales them quickly.

I prefer applesauce based cake dougnuts for keeping. At least the recipe I use does hold longer than a plain cake doughnut.... I make mine using a small ice cream scooper to portion them out into the fat. They turn over all my themselfs when the first side is done cooking.

Flour doesn't have any effect on tenderness in this item. For any doughnut you need to have a light hand. If your making cake doughnuts you mix them JUST until combined any more than that will build the gluten and give you a tough doughnut. Similarly if yu add too much flour to your yeast doughnut it will be heavy. the best yeast doughnuts are very moist hard to handle doughs. Where you must use a spatula to tranfer them to the oil.

I hope this helped?

P.S. you can make a yeast potato dough the first day, hold them in the cooler over night and fry them the second day, if that helps you time wise.
"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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"Bakers are born, not made. We are exacting people who delight in submitting ourselves to rules and formulas if it means achieving repeatable perfection", Rose Levy Beranbaum
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post #5 of 28
Thread Starter 

W.DeBord

Thanks for the info. I will look for an Amish cookbook with potato doughnuts in it:)
Ron--WV--Funbilly
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Ron--WV--Funbilly
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post #6 of 28
potato starch added to your dough could work. I have never been able to hold them over night. (they get eaten too fast!)
try also Bernard Clayton's "Small Breads" or "Beard on Bread"
:bounce:

Also, I find using malt syrup in place of or in addition to the batter makes it lighter, better to feed the yeast.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #7 of 28
Thread Starter 

m brown--doughnuts

That's one of the problems with being a "compliant" Diabetic. Everyone eats every last one of the darn things and if I don't hide a couple away for the next day I lose out:(

Thanks for your suggestion! :)
Ron--WV--Funbilly
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Ron--WV--Funbilly
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post #8 of 28

Mother's Recipe

Wolfgang, I was looking for a place to get good donuts and found your blog. My mother (Virginia) made donuts when I was young. I'm not much of a cook, but I remember them being delicious. Mom was a fabulous cook. I hope you enjoy. Maybe I'll get motivated and give them a go.:)

Here is a copy of my mother's recipe:

1 c. scalded milk 1 pkg. yeast 2 T. Crisco 2 T. sugar 1 t. salt
3 1/2 c. flour 1/4 c. lukewarm water 1 egg (well beaten)

Combine milk, shortening, sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm. Add yeast softened in water. Add egg. Gradually stir in flour to make soft dough. Beat vigorously. cover and let rise until double in bulk. Turn out on floured board, knead and shape. Cut, let rise. Deep fry and dip into glaze while hot.

I found another recipe in her box:

Glazed Potato Doughnuts (Lee Sickles)

1 pkg. active dry yeast 1/4 c. warm water
1 c. milk, scalded 1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup shortening 1 t. salt
3/4 cup mashed potatoes 2 eggs beaten
5-6 cups flour

Dissolve yeast in warm water. Combine milk, shortening, sugar and salt and cook until lukewarm. Stir in yeast, potatoes, and eggs. Gradually add enough flour to make a soft dough. Turn onto a floured surface and knead until smooth and satiny (approximately 7 minutes, adding flour to keep from sticking) Place in a lightly greased bowl, turn over to grease top. cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in size 1-1 1/2 hours. Roll to 1.2 inch thickness. Cut with 3 inch donut cutter. cover let rise until doubled (about 30 minutes).

Deep fry at 375 degrees and dip into glaze while hot.

Glaze 1 pound powdered sugar
6 T. water
1 T. vanilla

Mix together. It will look like thick cream.
post #9 of 28
Hi Wolfgang,

If by Old World breads, you mean those great German ryes I want to know what you know!

OK, for potato doughnuts, here's a recipe I got from an Amish baker, but never tried it.

1 cup sugar
1 cup mashed potatoes
1/2 cup lard or shortening
3 eggs beaten
1-1/2 tsp salt
1-1/2 - 2 packages yeast
1 cup warm water
5 cups flour (altered as necessary depending on your flour).

On this recipe, you might also want to change the water to scalded milk, as in the other recipe given here.

Now, since you mentioned you're a diabetic, here's a link to a site which is a very special bread site, for Baked donuts, not fried, if that helps any.


Yeasted Baked Doughnuts Recipe | Wild Yeast

Now there's also cake donuts and yeast donuts, I'm assuming you're after yeast donuts. but maybe you're after a cake donut, they're always tender, but generally more dense and not as light as a good yeast donut.
post #10 of 28
oakrockcat79 have you got any pictures of your final product ?

I think ill give your recipe a go this weekend
post #11 of 28
This recipe was posted in the Chicago Tribune, January 15, 1997

Servings: 20
1 cup apple cider
1 cup granulated sugar
1/4 cup solid vegetable shortening
2 large eggs
1/2 cup buttermilk
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
Vegetable Oil
or shortening (for frying)
Glaze:
2 cup confectioners' sugar
1/4 cup apple cider
Boil apple cider in small saucpan until it is reduced to 1/4 cup, 8 to 10 minutes; cool.
Beat sugar with shortening until smooth. Add eggs and mix well, then add buttermilk and reduced cider. Stir together flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, salt and nutmeg in another bowl. Add to liquid ingredients; mix just enough to combine.
Transfer dough to lightly floured board and pat to 1/2-inch thickness. Cut with 2 1/2- to 3-inch doughnut cutter; reserve doughnut holes and re-roll and cut scraps.
Add enough oil or shortening to fill a deep pan 3 inches; heat to 375 degrees F. Fry several doughnuts at a time, turning once or twice, until browned and cooked through, about 4 minutes. Remove to paper towels with slotted spoon
For glaze, mix confectioners' sugar and cider. Dip doughnuts while warm; serve warm.
post #12 of 28
The Bomboloni recipe from Jacques Torres is the lightest and fluffiest doughnut I have ever made, or eaten. Not too difficult to make and so delicious.
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check out my books at the pastrymama1 shop at www.half.ebay.com
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post #13 of 28
You say that everyone is going with packaged donut mix? Where can I find these at? I have the same problem, If I make them one day, they are kinda chewy the next. It puzzles me. Hope you can help. Thanks
post #14 of 28
I have been experimenting with donuts too as to how to keep them soft even just for 8hrs in the open. If you would notice donuts from Dunkin Donuts that they stay soft even for 24 hrs in the open. I found out they use additional ingredients to the basic donut recipe but I dont know exactly what these ingredients are. What we have here in this forum are basic recipes. Maybe someone out there could share his knowledge as to what ingredients or chemicals we should add that would keep our donuts soft for some time. For those who would want to open a donut shop like me its important to find this out because freshly fried donuts turns stale after just an hour and you would have a very high overhead expenses if you keep frying donuts the whole day.
post #15 of 28
If I am not mistaken, the extra ingredient is the softener. You can buy it from the cake supply shop. We put about 10 gm per 1 kg flour. It makes the donut soft longer.
post #16 of 28
I want to know what the secret to make fluffy donuts
post #17 of 28

I am baking a that has its fruits soaked in alcohol. traditionally, rum is added as soon as the cakes leave the oven. The challenge is that these cakes cannot be sold to minors. Is there any products that would give the flavor without the alcohol?

post #18 of 28

I have made this recipe many many times and there usually aren't any left for tomorrow, but if there are they aren't had or chewy!  I don't know if it is a storage issue or what, but when I take the doughnuts to an event they are never any leftovers.

 

It is simply just the Tupperware Bread Recipe with an altering on the amount of sugar

 

Tupperware Bread Donuts

9 cups flour

1 1/2 c scalded Milk 

1 1/2 C cool water

2/3 c sugar (changed to 1 heaping cup for doughnuts)

2 tsp salt

4 beaten eggs

2 pkg yeast ( i like rapid rise)

--------

1 cup melted margarine (melt as soon as you seal the bowl)

4 beaten eggs

 

Put flour in large tupperware bowl(i like to microwave my flour for about a min to warm it, depending on the strengh of your microwave, and it gives the whole process a jump start), making a well in the center, pour milk, water, sugar, salt in well and sprinkle yeast on top ( i like to take a little flour and dust over the top of the yeast so it gets going as well).

 

Seal the bowl and set in a warm spot and leave until lid pops off (20 min or less).  Add the melted margarine that has cooled.  And the 4 beaten eggs.  Then mix with wooden spoon.  Turn onto counter top and knead in flour just past the tacky stage.  Return to bowl, seal and leave until seal pops again.

 

For: Bread shape as desired, Let rise and bake at 375 for 20-30 min.

 

When seal pops, for doughnuts, flour your surface and turn the doughout of bowl not punching the dough down, actually handling it carefully as not to make it deflate.  Roll gently to approx 1/2" to 3/4" and cut.  IMPORTANT I use a Old Tuna Can, that has been washed of course, because size matters.  After cutting out the circle, pick up the dough and gently poke both your thumbs through the center.    Fry at 375 just until lightly brown, and frost just as they come out of the fryer.  I use an electric skillet and depending on the size of the skillet, you can get either 4 or 6 in it.

 

FROSTING

I use a full bag of Powdered Sugar and put it in a bowl with just enough cool water until it is easy to stir.  IMPORTANT Not to much water, but not to little, and how you can tell is if its to thick your doughnut will stick in the sugar and not come out.  I drop them in, flip them over, and then hang them on wooden spoons over the bowl until they drip free.  When the next batch is just ready to come out of the fryer, these are ready to move to a container.   This is also IMPORTANT  - storing them properly is essecential for the doughnut because if you store it tightly covered the frosting becomes tacky and runs off the doughnut.  I use a box which is lined with waxed paper of butcher paper, and leave them uncovered because while they are hot they need to be kept left open.  I put them in the box on there end and then just slightly lay them over at a 80% angle.

 

Then its just a matter of eating them! Oh make sure you eat one before you give them to the Gang! 

post #19 of 28

Hey oakrockcat79...I made these donuts using your mother's recipe. 

 

I am no cook, but I followed the instructions and they came out fantastic!  Light and tasty....melting in your mouth..mmm..

 

thanks!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oakrockcat79 View Post

Wolfgang, I was looking for a place to get good donuts and found your blog. My mother (Virginia) made donuts when I was young. I'm not much of a cook, but I remember them being delicious. Mom was a fabulous cook. I hope you enjoy. Maybe I'll get motivated and give them a go.:)

Here is a copy of my mother's recipe:

1 c. scalded milk 1 pkg. yeast 2 T. Crisco 2 T. sugar 1 t. salt
3 1/2 c. flour 1/4 c. lukewarm water 1 egg (well beaten)

Combine milk, shortening, sugar and salt. Cool to lukewarm. Add yeast softened in water. Add egg. Gradually stir in flour to make soft dough. Beat vigorously. cover and let rise until double in bulk. Turn out on floured board, knead and shape. Cut, let rise. Deep fry and dip into glaze while hot.



Glaze 1 pound powdered sugar
6 T. water
1 T. vanilla

Mix together. It will look like thick cream.
post #20 of 28

Thanks Delly In Lincol for recipe, i want use that to make doughnuts to my friends.

My personal blog about tea: Tea Time

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My personal blog about tea: Tea Time

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post #21 of 28

I want to thank oakrockcat and deli in lincoln for their recipes. I make donuts for church many Sundays.  I had a yeast-risen recipe that I thought was pretty good (a former donut shop owner in our church commented that it was similar to what he had made) but was just thinking I was looking for a lighter version. In addition, my sous chef son says they are a little chewy. I am going to have a donut bakeoff this Sunday. I am going to try both recipes at the same time and see what people say at church. The scientist in me also wants to see what the potato does. God bless you all and thanks for the tips ....Many people this Sunday will be thanking you also...I hope...LOL

post #22 of 28

Hello there

 

can you give me the name of the book for TORRES please??

 

is it the one on amazon?

post #23 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zaza View Post

If I am not mistaken, the extra ingredient is the softener. You can buy it from the cake supply shop. We put about 10 gm per 1 kg flour. It makes the donut soft longer.

From a former chemist, what is the technical name of this "softener" that you mention??????!!!!!!??????

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #24 of 28

Don't use bread flour for donuts! Use low gluten flour.

post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by yowa4 View Post
 

I am baking a that has its fruits soaked in alcohol. traditionally, rum is added as soon as the cakes leave the oven. The challenge is that these cakes cannot be sold to minors. Is there any products that would give the flavor without the alcohol?

 

Would rum extract work? If you were using the alcohol to reconstitute the fruit, I guess you may need to water down the extract to up the liquid proportion, but it should work. I went to an Italian place that made kid-friendly tiramisu with rum extract and it was pretty good.

post #26 of 28

Try this instead of extract...no chemical aftertaste.

http://shop.lorannoils.com/templates/product.aspx?ProductGuid=0746-0800&GroupGuid=10

 

mimi

post #27 of 28

Will you share this recipe from Jack Torres? Bombolini??

post #28 of 28

Search the Food Network site for Bombolini... it is Jacque Torres' recipe.

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