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ammonium carbonate substitutions

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
OK who really knows a real substitution for this?? So far I have read from several sources that
1 tsp= 1tsp baking soda,--- random internet page with a springerle recipe
1 tsp= 1tsp. baking soda+1 tsp. baking powder,- Dianas desserts website
1 tsp= 3/4 tsp. baking powder ISO recipes
1 tsp= 6 tsp baking powder --King arthur flour book.
1 tsp= 1 tsp baking powder-betty crocker website
1 tsp = 1 tsp cream of tartar- better homes and gardens cookbook dictionary

I am making springerle tomorrow for fun but the source recipes I have all call for the ammonium carbonate, could anyone with real experience with substitutions chime in here?? I've always used baking powder but they are not the same as I remember from Germany. I 've come to the realization there are as many springerle recipes as springerle bakers.
Thanks.
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post #2 of 6
Ammonium carbonate, aka bicarbonate of ammonia, aka hartshorn is a carbon-dioxide producer -- like double acting baking powder the bulk of CO2 production occurs at heat. Double acting baking powder is the best substitute at somewhere between 1:1 and 2:1 baking powder to ammonium carbonate. I'd start at 1.5:1 with the first batch, and adjust. You can always add more.

BDL
post #3 of 6
Listen to BDL, the man knows his chemistry!!!:lol:
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post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
I tried that today BDL, they rose but did not have the "feet" on the botton, I will keep trying, thanks again.
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post #5 of 6

I used a very old family recipe for Springerle, which I've used many times before with great success.  I did find that I needed to use medium eggs to keep them from getting too gooey.  This year, however, I needed to purchase some new Hartshorn...bought the bakers' ammonia from King Aurthur Flour.  I can not get them to turn out!  I've made two batches, thinking I must've mis-measured something the first time...but both batches looked beautiful on the top, but completely disolved on the bottom leaving the hollow tops on a spread out gooey mess!  What could the problem be?  I leave the rolled biscuits on greased cookie sheets overnight to dry out and bake them at 300 degrees for 13  minutes.  Do they need to be drier before I bake them or, perhaps, a different temperature, or is it an ingredient issue.  Please help if you can! 

post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 

Maybe it is the grease on your sheet pan, try parchement paper.

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