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corn muffins or cornbread with real corn in them

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I had a request from a nostalgic ex-pat american for corn muffins made with actual corn (fresh. canned) in them besides the cornmeal. He said he tried to add corn to a regular recipe but of course, it was too wet. Does anyone know a good recipe, or how to adapt a current recipe (they should be slightly sweet, but not like cupcakes, and moist.) Cornbread like that would also be good. Thanks
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #2 of 13
Did you drain the corn? Canned corn, at least in the US, is usually packed in water. You don't need it, so drain it off. Or use frozen corn kernels, thawed. (Don't know if you can get those in rome, though)

here's what I use. This makes an 9" square pan worth, or about 12 muffins.
you'll have to excuse US-style measurements: (1 cup is about 235 ml, if that helps)

1 1/4 C all-purpose flour
3/4 C corn meal
1/4 C sugar (that's about as sweet as I'd go, you can use much less)
1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) salt
2 teaspoons (10 ml) baking powder
1 C Milk
1/4 C oil or melted butter
1 egg

1/2 C corn, drained if using canned.

Sift dry ingredients together. Beat egg in milk and oil, add all at once, stirring until just incorporated. Fold in corn. Pour into greased pan or muffin tins. Bake 400, 20-25 minutes. Top will start to turn golden brown, and toothpick will test clean when done. Muffins will take less than that, but I don't do them often. I'd check at 15, and then every minute from there.
post #3 of 13
Hi there,

We serve something like that this at our place. I can part with the recipe if you PM me.

--Al
post #4 of 13
I made jalepino corn muffins yesterday.....

Jiffy corn muffin mix (2 boxes)
2 eggs
1/2 cup yogurt
approx 1/3 cup water
1 can of corn drained
1 fresh jalepino sliced
5 slices of jalepino cheese (cut into 4 pieces)

mix corn muffin mix, eggs, yogurt, water in a bowl ....don't over mix.....add corn, scoop into muffin tins and top with jalpino cheese slice with a sliver of jalepino on top. Cook per package directions.

Jiffy is slightly sweet, great texture with yogurt or sour cream added...the addition of corn and jalepinos just makes them yummier. I've made lots of corn bread from scratch but keep going back to Jiffy.:blush:
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #5 of 13
I use the Jiffy corn mix too, but I substitute canned cream corn for the liquid, along with the fresh jalapeno.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Yes, did drain the corn. No, can;t get frozen here, and although the person making the request is in England I don;t think he can either. OCCASIONALLY can find fresh.

Thanks s much for the recipe, i'll try it myself and also pass it on. I have no problem with cup measurements and absolutely hate to weigh stuff, so i always use cups.
thanks again
siduri
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks shroomgirl, but for good or bad, i can';t get jiffy here.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #8 of 13
I do love corn bread! I usually bake mine in a cast iron skillet. I start off by slicing a few strips of bacon and then cook them in the skillet. Then I'll spread the bacon fat onto the sides of the skillet and proceed with the recipe.

When corn on the cob is in season I'll use corn taken off the cob in the batter. Then I'll run the edge of a knife over the cob to add the milk as well. In summer, sometimes I'll finish the recipe by cooking it in the cast iron skillet over indirect heat on the grill. Over direct heat I'll cook a couple of cobs in the husk. Some of the flavor and aroma of the corn in the husk grilling goes right into the corn bread.

Depending on the recipe I'm using I'll add nothing, jalapeño peppers, fresh pineapple or whatever suits me that day. I sometimes finish with a slight rub of butter (while it's still warm) and a shake of sugar and cayenne. Other times I'll leave it plain or a light drizzle of honey.

dan
post #9 of 13

re

we roast the corn to dry it out and bring out more roasted type flavor to the cornbread.
post #10 of 13

I just followed that recipe, and the Corn Bread was great.  I substituted Soy Milk for the milk and I used Olive oil and no butter for the oil.

post #11 of 13
Quote:
I followed this recipe and it turned out great.  I substituted Milk with soy milk and used olive oil instead of butter.  Originally Posted by dscheidt View Post

Did you drain the corn? Canned corn, at least in the US, is usually packed in water. You don't need it, so drain it off. Or use frozen corn kernels, thawed. (Don't know if you can get those in rome, though)

here's what I use. This makes an 9" square pan worth, or about 12 muffins.
you'll have to excuse US-style measurements: (1 cup is about 235 ml, if that helps)

1 1/4 C all-purpose flour
3/4 C corn meal
1/4 C sugar (that's about as sweet as I'd go, you can use much less)
1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) salt
2 teaspoons (10 ml) baking powder
1 C Milk
1/4 C oil or melted butter
1 egg

1/2 C corn, drained if using canned.

Sift dry ingredients together. Beat egg in milk and oil, add all at once, stirring until just incorporated. Fold in corn. Pour into greased pan or muffin tins. Bake 400, 20-25 minutes. Top will start to turn golden brown, and toothpick will test clean when done. Muffins will take less than that, but I don't do them often. I'd check at 15, and then every minute from there.


 

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChefRAZ View Post

we roast the corn to dry it out and bring out more roasted type flavor to the cornbread.


I was going to suggest this.  Scatter the corn on a cookie sheet and roast in a low oven to evaporate the moisture before adding to the mix.  I just made a divine corn pudding for Thanksgiving by the way, it bakes almost like a bread but is moist and cheesy and would probably make good use of the wet canned corn.  (I substitute bell peppers for the poblanos and prosciutto for the serrano and monterrey jack for some of the manchego so it's a dish that welcomes substitutions.)

 

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Serrano-Ham-and-Poblano-Corn-Pudding-233408

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #13 of 13

I usually just add 1/2 cup of either frozen (thawed) or fresh corn to my regular corn bread recipe for an 8" pan.  Works just fine.  If you add too much corn, you do add more moisture, so don't over do it.  Perhaps that is the issue?

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