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Opinions on Chroma/Porsche knives - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Alan View Post
 

VG10 can rust right in the kitchen, I can tell you that first hand, and that is premium priced stainless considerably above the alloy that porche uses. 440 series will also rust and pit just sitting in a leather sheaf long enough, I have a $600+ Randall did just that. I have some cheap stainless knives from decades ago that have never tarnished the slightest, but I'd trade them in an instant for ones made of s110v, or even half-decent made 440.

 

Rick

 

Leather is acidic and shouldn't be used for storage for the reason you discovered. Leather sheaths are for when you're carrying such a knife. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #32 of 49

A "Stainless Steel" kitchen knife that rusts is no sign of poor quality, rather the opposite. In order to really be "stain free" how most people understand the term would mean they would have to contain at least 18% chrome.

 

Such a high chrome content would give them horrible edge retention and make them hard to sharpen. Modern "Stainless" blade steels usually contain 12% or less chrome and as such really are just "stain retardant" at best.

 

The very best blade steels, like those used by the best Japanese bladesmiths, contain no chrome at all.

post #33 of 49

Why do we need Cr anyway?

Oh, for stroping... hehehhe

post #34 of 49

Rick,

 

I have a knife that, as far as I know, was the first commercial kitchen knives made of VG10.  The entire blade, except of course the edge, is coated with Teflon to prevent it from rusting.

post #35 of 49

This thread reminds me that I haven't seen any posts by BDL in quite a while.  Does anyone know what happened to him or if he is alright?

post #36 of 49

Can't speak for him - but his ChefTalk profile shows that he was last online a week ago.

 

His last post was August 20th of this year'

 

 

Galley Swiller

post #37 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhpr262 View Post
 

A "Stainless Steel" kitchen knife that rusts is no sign of poor quality, rather the opposite. In order to really be "stain free" how most people understand the term would mean they would have to contain at least 18% chrome.

 

Such a high chrome content would give them horrible edge retention and make them hard to sharpen. Modern "Stainless" blade steels usually contain 12% or less chrome and as such really are just "stain retardant" at best.

 

The very best blade steels, like those used by the best Japanese bladesmiths, contain no chrome at all.

To be called stainless steel it has to have at least 13%Cr.  Most modern stainless has more than that and it sharpens up just fine.  ZDP189 & Cowry X have 20%Cr

Many of the best Japanese bladesmiths often use Aogami or Blue steel in their non stainless lines, and this contains some (though no much) Cr.  Many of the best Japanese bladesmiths also carry stainless lines.

 

The notion that stainless knives cannot be as sharp or hold an edge as long as non-stainless was once true, but now much less so.

 

A well heat treated modern stainless in 13c26 or similar will get so close to the sharpness of white steel off the stones that the difference is tiny.  After use however the swedish stainless will hold it's edge much longer as the thin blade edge of the reactive carbon steel is more prone to dulling than stainless when cutting onions or anything acidic.

post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

 

Leather is acidic and shouldn't be used for storage for the reason you discovered. Leather sheaths are for when you're carrying such a knife. 

 

Yes, leather is very slightly acidic, unlike tomatoe juice which in comparison is very acidic. And that is why it took over a decade for the sheath to do its minor damage, as opposed to the TJ (or whatever the heck it was I accidentally got on it) which took less than 24 hours.

 

Rick

post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kartman35 View Post
 

To be called stainless steel it has to have at least 13%Cr.  Most modern stainless has more than that and it sharpens up just fine.  ZDP189 & Cowry X have 20%Cr

Many of the best Japanese bladesmiths often use Aogami or Blue steel in their non stainless lines, and this contains some (though no much) Cr.  Many of the best Japanese bladesmiths also carry stainless lines.

 

The notion that stainless knives cannot be as sharp or hold an edge as long as non-stainless was once true, but now much less so.

 

A well heat treated modern stainless in 13c26 or similar will get so close to the sharpness of white steel off the stones that the difference is tiny.  After use however the swedish stainless will hold it's edge much longer as the thin blade edge of the reactive carbon steel is more prone to dulling than stainless when cutting onions or anything acidic.

 

Ahh, things just get better all the time.  There are already stainless steels with finer carbides than WS and far superior performance in every other respect, like S110V, except they need diamond/CBN type abrasives to sharpen properly, and I think that in the near future we can expect a stainless alloy that not only have carbides finer than WS, but sharpens as easy as well as performing better in every other category.

 

But WS and carbon steel in general will always have its romantic appeal.

 

Rick


Edited by Rick Alan - 12/9/13 at 6:59pm
post #40 of 49
 

 

post #41 of 49

I love knives and have more sets of knives than most people. Not sure how long ago, maybe 8 or 9 years ago I purchased a large set of the Chroma Porsche Knives. As I recall it was about a $1200 set. MY ADICE IS DO NOT BUY THESE KNIVES. They look beautiful and I did not have any problems with the grip and feel in the hand. The packaging was beautiful too, and I kept all the individual cartons.

 

As for sharpening and cutting, I have no real complaints; but it seems that I can get the blades much sharper on my other softer steel knives. For comfort and everyday use, I would even rate the IKEA knives much better than the Porsche Design knives. (far right in photo)

 

I have the PD knives on display on a kitchen wall...they are held on a wood strip with embedded whole earth magnets so the whole knife is on display. Quite Impressive!! A friend's wife who knew her husband admired them (he used them at our house several times) bought him a smaller, but still expensive, set for Christmas.

 

These knives are most fragile knives I have ever owned. From my original set FIVE of them have broken blades now. They snap off with the slightest stress. I actually use my other knives most of the time, so it is not from over use. One of them (pictured) fell about 5 inches to the granite counter top below and the end of the blade broke off. They have all broken from short drops on the counter. NONE of my other knives (some also expensive) have ever broken. My friend who received them as a gift now reports that one of his knives has snapped off now too.

 

Unless you want to display them under glass and not use them, do not buy them. I would feel better if these knives had a lifetime warranty...maybe they do and I just don't know it.

 

See pic bellow....five brands of knives.

 

post #42 of 49

I sharpened 3 Haikus this morning, a pairing, a Santoku, and an 8" chef's, using a 1000 grit King and then a 3000 grit King.  Each knife produced much more swarf, in the slurry, than I've seen from any of my other knives.  Not sure if this means anything, in terms of the quality of the metal, but think it's not a good sign.

post #43 of 49

Went after a butternut squash with the 8"; the handle beat the heck out of my hand.  Sharpened it well enough to slice through a piece of paper, but still struggled with the squash.  To compare, I tried my Mac Pro and Carter, on the same ornery squash.  Both of these knives required less effort.

post #44 of 49

Interesting !!!!!!!!!

Have been using Chroma Type 301 knifes for more then 5 years every day in very busy european style kitchens, and this particular one who is broken in picture is one of my working horses, have been falling on all kind of surfaces and from all kind of height and still no problems, i think there have been some bad exemplars out in market !

post #45 of 49
I have owned and used a Porsche Deba and Santuko for 15+ years. They are my goto knives when I have anything over the top to prepare. I usually use my Global's but the just don't measure up to the Porsche. You will not be unhappy in the LEAST BIT!
post #46 of 49

Yeah, I'll stick with my carbon Sabatiers and Opinels and various unbranded carbon blades I find at flea markets.  Love them!

post #47 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

In the magazine I saw a set that looks like some of my Sabatier knives, which brings me to my question , how do I know that my knives are authentic. What is the trademark of these knives (Sabatier) ?
Sorry if this sounds like a dumb question, everything seems to be made in China.....

Sabatier is part of Thiers-Issard brand and they have an elephant stamped on the blade near the bolster.  My old Sabatiers have the elephant as well, although the newer ones (~20 years old) don't.  I guess you just have to rely on their appearance (they all seem to have the same black handle and steel rivets) and the honesty of the seller at this point.

 

Nick

post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Full Sack View Post
 

Went after a butternut squash with the 8"; the handle beat the heck out of my hand.  Sharpened it well enough to slice through a piece of paper, but still struggled with the squash.  To compare, I tried my Mac Pro and Carter, on the same ornery squash.  Both of these knives required less effort.

 

Too thick at the edge obviously, those Haikus, likely a couser grained steel also.  Certainly neither would be a problem with a Carter.

post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard N View Post
 

Hello, my wife is the chef. I want to give her a set of knives, but I can not choose which ones are better. Do you think it's worth to buy ceramic knives or still steel?

Why ceramic?

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