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the pressured cheesecake?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I used to bake cheesecakes for local restaurants a few years back, stopped for a while and an opportunity has struck and I want to continue. Now, I actually successfully baked a 9" round cheesecake in a 12 QT stew pot last night, semi covered, and it came out perfect. however it took a little longer then an hour which i was not happy about. Anyway, I was considering getting 4 pressure cookers, for 4 cheesecakes and having the oven for 1 single cheesecake in a water bath.

My question is this, i'm almost positive i can't fit a cheesecake in anything less than a 12 qt pressure cooker, however, not only have I not cooked with one, I don't know what i should be looking for to buy. I have no experience with pressure cookers, but I will learn. I just need to know what I should be looking for specifically for baking cheesecakes. I'd like to spend under 150 for each, I don't know if thats possible however. Any information some professionals can give me would be great.
post #2 of 8
Cheesecakes can certainly be successfully made in pressure cookers. The size cake will depend on 2 things: 1. the inside diameter of the pressure cooker, and 2. The outside diameter of the springform pan, including the locking mechanism which usually sticks out a bit beyond the rest of the pan. My 7" springform pan fits in all three of my Presto Pressure cookers, although I could easily use an 8" pan in the 8qt one. The inside diameter of my 8qt Presto is 9 & 3/8"-- not quite enough for a 9" pan. A 7" cheesecake typically would be timed 20 minutes once full pressure is reached, then remove from heat and allow pressure to drop naturally -- approx. 10 or so minutes.

Unless you are looking at aluminum pressure cookers, the 12qt models are pretty costly. However, unless you want to stack the cakes, to do 2 at a time (yes, it can be done), you can probably use 10 qt models, because the volume difference between the 10 & 12 models is upward, rather than outward. For the purpose you are considering, aluminum cookers will work very well, and cost considerably less. However, if you want to cook other foods as well, then I would suggest you get the number of cookers you want, but have one of them made of stainless steel. That way, you have one non-reactive metal cooker that you can use to prepare all sorts of foods. Presto makes inexpensive cookers with the "jiggler" pressure regulator. I actually prefer this, as I grew up with it, and it's my comfort zone. Fagor cookers are in the mid-price range, with more modern pressure control. There are others similar to them. Then, there is the Kuhn-Rikon. Touted as the 'Mercedes' of pressure cookers, they are well-made, and some say they perform better than any other pressure cookers on the market today. Expensive, though, but if you consider it a lifetime investment, it will probably be the last pressure cooker you'll ever buy. It's a cooker you can proudly leave on the stove to show off with. (My personal opinion, however, is that it is a lot of money to spend when you can achieve the same results without the high price.) We are talking around $400 for a 12-qt model Kuhn-Rikon, vs. under $200 for a Fagor, or under $100 for the Presto aluminum. All pressure cookers on the market today must meet certain safety standards set by the USDA, so from the least expensive to the priciest, safety concerns become a non-issue in the final decision. Another important consideration is the availability and cost of replacement parts. The gasket will need to be replaced periodically, and sometimes other parts go missing or become broken. Be sure your homework includes this information. Your cooker will be totally worthless if replacement parts cannot be found.

Below is the place to go for the best and most complete information on this subject. This website is dedicated exclusively to pressure cooking. Vickie Smith willingly answers questions and offers her help and expertise.

click here-----> Miss Vickie's Guide to Modern Pressure Cookery
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
thank you for such an in depth reply. Now I have one more question, I live in pennsylvania, is there a different inspection rules for baking cheesecakes as opposed to your normal cake for becoming a business.
post #4 of 8
I cannot answer that question. Although I lived in PA until 1980, and even had my own restaurant from 1976 to 1979, I only know what the rules were at that time for restaurants. I would say, even though most of the members here have good intentions, and want to help, it would be better to contact the PA department of health directly. They will provide you with all the information you will need. You might even find this information online at their website. I wish you success with your business. Let us know your progress.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #5 of 8
no.

in PA you must have an approved / inspected / licensed kitchen for the preparation of any foodstuffs - of any nature - sold to the public.

the usual and customary design features of "home" kitchens do not meet the rules.

there are no exceptions for cheesecakes.
post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
whats your method for stacking them in the cooker?
post #7 of 8
The cheesecakes will be covered with aluminum foil, and tied with stout string or a strong rubber band.

You will need a rack to sit the first cheesecake pan on, over 2 cups of water. Typically one steamer rack will be included with the cooker. Next, a round wire cake rack to put on top of the first pan. Instead of placing the second pan directly on top of the wire rack, however, you will need a way to separate the 2 pans, to allow steam ot circulate freely. This doesn't need to be a huge space. I would go to the hardware store and purchase a strip of 1/2" square wood and cut it to the needed length to sit on top of the cake rack. Use two of them. Your cooking time will begin when you have reached full pressure. There is no adjustment needed for doing more than one cake at a time.

The height of this arrangement will still need to allow for the pressure cooker lid to be easily locked into place.

You said you are not familiar with pressure cooking? The best thing to do before attempting any finished dish with a pressure cooker, is to "test drive" the appliance. Go to Miss Vickie's website to get the full instructions on this procedure.

Pressure cooking is not difficult or complicated, but as with any cooking technique, some education is necessary. I wish you success with this.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks again for such an in depth reply. Now my trouble is location. I really can't bake and sell from my home, I have a building behind by house with seperate electric but no sewage or water.. So I'm not sure if I can bake+store in there and clean in my house but I doubt it. Not sure what my options are going to be now.
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