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Looking for - Oven Roasted Filet Mignon Recipe

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for a good recipe for roasting a whole filet mignon (terderloin) in the oven. My mom used to buy a whole one and roast it in the oven every year for our Christmas dinner. I've done some research and most of the recipes I've found have you sear it first on all sides in a skillet then move it to the oven. Any recipes or tips would greatly be appreciated. Thanks!
post #2 of 11
In a home kitchen you most likely don't have a pan big enough to sear a whole tenferloin. I would suggest a roast pan on top of the 2 burners to do this. Almost all catering ,hotels and restaurants sear first then oven it seals in all the juices and flavor.:lips:
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the tip Chefed. I notice you're from Palm Beach. We've spent many vacations in Delray Beach - still have some family there. Delray is full of great restaurants! One of our favorite places to visit!
post #4 of 11
I sear as well and finish in the oven with a thermometer reading of no more than 120. Make sure it is up to room temperature before you start the cooking process. Before I sear I like to rub with a paste made of olive oil, garlic, thyme, pepper, salt, paprika, or even rosemary. You can even put some horseradish or mustard in the paste too, whatever flavors you're looking for. Sear on all sides until it reaches a golden crust and then straight into the oven in the same pan to finish. 350-375.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #5 of 11
Your quite welcome. And yes there are some very good restaurants in Delray 2 Georges, Bannana Boat, a lot of good seafood places.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #6 of 11
It's a bit tangential to what you're asking, but for a whole tenderloin, consider searing on the grill (if you have one, weather permitting), then finishing with indirect heat in the grill, or in the oven. You'll get a much better flavor and texture on the bark, and a roast as important as a tenderloin is worth the extra trouble.

In fact, I smoke over oak first, 'til not quite rare, then sear and finish over a very hot, wood coal fire. Complex and a bit expensive, requiring a smoker. a separate grill, two oak fireplace quarter logs to make enough coals for an 8 minute sear, and the timing to make the whole thing work out -- but again, worth the extra trouble.

Whether you go sear/oven, all oven, or use one of my outdoors suggestions, don't forget to trim the tail and truss the roast into a nice, tidy package before cooking. You'll appreciate it later when you carve.

BDL
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post #7 of 11
Haven't we had this 'seal in the juices' discussion before?

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #8 of 11
>>>Haven't we had this 'seal in the juices' discussion before?

oh indeed - wanna bet we'll have it more again? like forever? <g>

my own experience says there's something to the theory - but there's a lot of definition lacking to the "experiments"

for example, if you start with dry aged beef, what's "left" to seal in? dry aging easily whacks 10% - perhaps 15% of the weight - on a five pound roast that's a cup of water/juice/liquid gone before you start searing/no searing.

the "cut" - my casual observations says a large flat cross grain cut loses "juices" lots faster than a long grain cut of the same size.

that does not explain everything either - a 1 inch thick cross cut steak is way apt more to "go dry" than a 3 inch thick cut - with or without searing - in a pan or on the grill.

I'm very much a proponent of searing - near charring in some cases - for flavor, color & mouth appeal crunch/texture - but I am not relying on that technique to "seal in" the juices making it juicier/whatever.

the adage of "don't poke it with a fork" thing: seared or not seared, if cooked fast at a high temp, poke a roast and juice come out in copious quantities (well, the first couple of pokes, anyway...) cook the same cut low&slow and I don't see that effect.

I call it the balloon effect - when exposed to fast high heat meat shrinks right before your very eyes. poke a balloon and the stuff inside comes out. low&slow I don't see that effect - or perhaps I don't see it because I get tired of watching?
post #9 of 11
That's not true, Alton Brown did an experiment on good eats and proved it doesn't seal juices, and you actually wind up with less juice when you do it that way.
post #10 of 11
yup
saw that

problem:
from an engineer's viewpoint, there salada holes in the method, analysis and conclusions.

and actually I happen to like AB's shows . . .
post #11 of 11
tread lightly, Ed is certainly no fan of Mr. Brown if I can remember. :)

Anyways, I have a sort of similar question as the OP, but not really, but Im going to post a new thread, since this one went straight to mythbuster-dom!
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