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garlic

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I've heard of two different ways to give a stronger garlic taste
1. cook garlic no more then 45 sec
2.the bigger slices of garlic cut,the stronger the garlic flavor
which is it?
thanks:chef:
post #2 of 11
Not exactly. The finer it's cut the more potent the garlic is. The longer you cook it the sweeter it gets. But there are many factors to consider, like how you cook it, and at what temperature. For example in a stir-fry - if you want a lot of garlic flavor mince the garlic. If you want just a little garlic flavor throw it in whole. In either case make sure not to burn it or it will turn bitter.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 11
Mapiva has you on the right track.

The alliums (onions, garlic, shallots) achieve their characteristic pungency through sulfur compounds. These compounds are able to form more when the allium is cut. So the more you cut it (finer mince) the stronger the flavor.

The finer the cut, the faster it cooks. In the case of garlic, a fine mince can scorch easily which tastes unpleasant so it is cooked for a few tens of seonds. Then other ingredients are added to cool down the pan and protect the garlic.

Garlic cooked whole is mellow and can take on sweet tones.

You'll frequently see garlic cut in slices and used generously. This is done to give the garlic more ability to handle longer heating times. It won't have as strong a flavor as it's not cut so finely. So more is used to build the garlic intensity.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 
THANKS:talk:
post #5 of 11
The smaller the cut the more dispersion you have thru the dish hence a heavier garlic flavor. If you want the "heat" ccok it less, if you want it "sweeter" cook it longer.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #6 of 11
If you want it really sweet and mellow, cut a whole bulb in half, drizzle with EVOO and roast in a moderate oven till fragrant and squishy (say 20 mins depending on your oven). To use, let it cool a little, then just take it and squeeze out the insides. It is so nice as a flavouring without any of the pungent strength associated with garlic. Like with onions, the slower and longer you cook them, the less pungent and sweeter they get.

DC
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #7 of 11
I interpreted this as meaning for the same given amount of cooking time (45 sec), the bigger pieces won't cook all the way through, so they will have a more potent garlickyness compared to thinly sliced.

Anyone ever accidentally swallow a whole garlic clove raw? I did the other day and it burned like a chili pepper!:eek:
post #8 of 11
Certainly -- I like raw garlic.

Now finely mince a clove of garlic and then spread it as hard as you can on your board, repeatedly, until it becomes a paste, and then eat that. Now you're going to get HOT: you can actually scorch yourself with this -- and I mean literally scorch, because we're talking about small amounts of sulfuric acid.

You know how when you cut an onion, you cry? That's because as you crush and break the cell walls, you're creating an oxidation reaction that produces sulfuric acid (in very small quantities, of course). If you cut an onion with a carbon steel knife and don't wipe soon, the knife will stain for the same reason. But if you cut that onion with good technique and super-thin razor blade, you'll weep hardly at all, because it will cut and do almost no crushing, keeping the reaction to a minimum.

That's the simplistic version of why whole allium (e.g. garlic) is hot, sliced is hotter, and minced or ground is hottest.
post #9 of 11
I nibble on raw garlic all the time :lol: but I a a chilihead and the garlic isn't that hot!
post #10 of 11
Y'all keep saying "garlic" as though it was all the same.

In fact, there are something like 559 known varieties of garlic, with different amounts of heat and flavor. Plus the heat doesn't hit the same way. Some have a delay, and then whamo. Others explode instantly, than fade away. With some you feel the heat in the back of the throat. Others you feel it in the front of your pallette, or on your tongue. Etc.

Complicating it further is the growing conditions. The same variety might not taste, nor have the same heat level, one year to the next when grown in the same place.

But, if you really want to know what garlic tastes like, you have to eat it raw.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 11
I agree with you there! I think about how a whole raw chili will burn the mouth (and again later), but when I swallowed the garlic, I was totally unprepared for the sensation, because it only burned in my stomach, and in a most uncomfortable way.

From now on I think I should pick out the whole chilis and garlic before I eat papaya salad.
No, I'll still do it anyways:crazy:.
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