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Corn meal vs. Flour

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I know that they are made from different plants, but could I use corn meal to make a rouix the same way I use flour?

Thanks.
post #2 of 11
No. Corn meal is coarsely ground and won't mix in the same way. Flour has a more neutral flavor as well.

A corn starch slurry can be used for thickening, but you don't toast the corn starch in oil nor boil it as it loses thickening power.
post #3 of 11
ROUX No I would not suggest making it with cornmeal. You will wind up with mush. It does not dissolve like flour, it has a distinct flavour, color darkens, does not have same absorbancy properties as flour, cost more then flour. You could make cheeze doodles though.
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post #4 of 11
Cornmeal has a grainy texture. As others have indicated, it won't dissolve the same way that flour will.

It should also be noted that there are different grinds of cornmeal. Steel ground yellow cornmeal lacks the husk and germ of the maize kernel. Stone ground cornmeal retains some of the hull and germ and has more flavor. Since the germ contains a small amount of oil, stone ground cornmeal is more perishable than steel ground.
post #5 of 11
Is there any non-glutinous flour that can be used to make a brown roux and get any thickening at all? And maybe have some toasty-brown flavor? My mother-in-law is celiac and cannot tolerate gluten, but based on her other preferences I think she'd adore Cajun food.
post #6 of 11
Try modified food starch and gravy master. or tapioca starch and caramel color(blackjack)
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post #7 of 11
I use masa flour all the time to thicken chili. It does add a sweet taste though. Never tried it in a roux though.
post #8 of 11
Yes ... try using brown rice flour. This is one of the most popular non-gluten flour products that's available. Be advised that brown rice flour comes in coarse and fine grinds. Unless you use the fine grind, your roux will taste gritty.

You could also try using chickpea or garbanzo flour. The texture of this product is similar to that of wheat flour.
post #9 of 11
Most any dried bean ground up will thicken well and be subtle about it. White beans are probably the easiest to hide in things. Don't know how well they toast. Part of gumbo is the flavor of the well toasted flour. I can see a bean powder working well in gumbo though lacking a bit flavor. Perhaps also grind some nuts for that missing flour nuttiness from toasting/darkening.
post #10 of 11
Don't know if it would work or not, but you could try putting the cornmeal in a good quality blender and making your own corn flour, which in turn might make a roux, don't know for sure, but you got my curiosity up so I am going to try it. I have made rice flour in my Vita Mix, with fine results, using this method.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #11 of 11
try asian sweet rice flour. works the best for me - no funny taste, brown rice can have an overpowering taste. i can really taste if it's bean flour. ugh. did thanksgiving for 30+ totally gluten free and no one knew the difference. that included pies, cheesecake and biscuits.
you can also buy corn flour in the hispanic section of the supermarket, along with white rice flour. corn flour also has a distinct flavor.
actually been making gluten free bread that tastes like, and has texture of "real" loaf lately. got to put my mind in gear and write that cookbook!
pm me if you have questions on gluten free cooking.
kathee
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