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frog legs?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I just got some frog legs in and have never repared them before. Anyone know any savory recipes using frog legs?
post #2 of 13
The simplest thing to do is dip them in milk, then in seasoned flour or fine dry bread crumbs and pan-fry. Serve with a garlic-butter-parsley sauce.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 13
OOO, I haven't had frogs' legs in nearly 30 years, when my mother in law made them. As I recall, she did them the same way she made pan-fried chicken. She dredged first in flour, then into buttermilk, and then into bread crumbs with seasonings. They were delicious. Suzanne's garlic-butter-parsely sauce sounds great with them.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
suzanne could you tell me aquick recipe for the garlic butter parsley sauce?
post #5 of 13
I was the chef/partner in a restaurant called "the Boiled Frog" We did them several ways but the most popular by far was braised in a served with a sauteed white bean and vegetable ragu. they would fall off the bone and melt in your mouth. Super simple, super quick and really tasty.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #6 of 13
SIMPLE GARLIC, BUTTER, PARSLEY SAUCE

2 cloves garlic
1/4 cup (about) fresh parsley
1 tbs olive oil
4 tbs butter
1/2 tsp (couple of splashes) red wine vinegar

Mince the garlic. Separately mince the parsley.

Preheat a pan on medium low to medium heat. Add the olive oil. When the oil comes to temp, add the garlic and cook it slowly until the smell changes from raw and acrid to a fuller aroma -- five to ten minutes. Don't let the garlic brown or it will become bitter.

Bring the heat up to medium, add the butter. The butter will melt and begin to foam. The second the foam begins to subside, add the vinegar and swirl it in. The butter will turn brown very quickly. Remove the butter from the stove and add the parsley.

BDL
post #7 of 13

Meuniere

FWIW, one of the most "classic" methods for frog legs is meuniere.

If you like you may begin by marinating the legs in buttermilk. If you do, make sure they're dried thoroughly before seasoning them with salt and pepper, then dusting them heavily with flour. Do not shake the legs off before bringing them to a hot pan with the right amount of butter (and perhaps a little oil) to saute. Saute the frogs legs until lightly browned (GBD), allowing the excess flour to fall into the pan and brown. Remove the legs, plate them, and and drain the excess cooking fat, retaining all of the butter. Deglaze the pan with a splash of white wine, swirl in some more butter, a squeeze of lemon and parsley, savory or tarragon as the spirit moves. (The retained flour will help emulsify the butter as it's swirled in -- and makes this particular version of a butter sauce distinctive.

You can if you like, add a little minced garlic before deglazing with the wine, and saute it very briefly. Thus, uniting Suzanne's suggestion with classic technique and the structured and refined version of the sauce which results from it. A straight butter sauce, even though the same amount of butter, can be a bit greasy.

Garnish the plate as with fish, plenty of lemon, a sprinkling of fresh minced parsley, over the legs, and a bouquet of green herbs.

Meuniere means "miller's wife style." The miller in question is the guy who makes the flour. So, the star here is the way the flour works to create a very light crust on the legs, and to make the sauce as well.

With a few changes, perhaps some cayenne, a couple of herbs to season (thyme, sage), a splash of Worcestershire in the deglaze, and so on, the dish will be as cooked in Louisiana -- cajun style. Not a bad thing, cher.

I loves me some frogs legs.

BDL

PS. This style of recipe is what I call "a running recipe," is the type I write for myself and keep in my notes, and should be easy for a good cook to follow. If you want a more structure recipe, the sort with quantities of ingredients on top, let me know.

PPS. It seems to be important to add the recipe is original with me, or at least the words are. I certainly didn't invent the meuniere method.
post #8 of 13
I've been meaning to work up the courage to try and cook these. I can get them $5 a pound all year at the grocery store.

Is frozen ok for these? And what level of done-ness is correct? Same as chicken?
post #9 of 13
Frozen is fine. They all come out of Thailand or India anyway so you're not going to get fresh ones. We do them pan fried, deep fried or broiled. Pan fried is the most popular with our customers. They cook fast and will dry up if over cooked. Sometimes they'll "dance" in the pan which can be kind of humorous and not unusual.
post #10 of 13

Thread Revival..  I just made frog legs a few nights ago and sauteed them in butter/garlic/cayenne/white wine and they were great. I had only had them fried before but wanted to see how they hold up using other methods. They stayed tender, I was surprised to see, without braising.

 

How do you cook them?

post #11 of 13

randomly, I found out recently, the French don't use their own frogs legs anymore. They import them from Asia???

 

had my first at a chinese buffet in Biloxi beach. battered... gorgeous.

 

Tried them at a Tepinyaki restaurant in Mayenne, France last month and couldn't bear to eat them, cos I could see all the muscles (theres a lot) Very off-putting

"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #12 of 13

Bughut - I think I heard somewhere that it is illegal to use the local frogs in France.  Probably a matter of scarcity due to over harvesting (someone will correct me if I'm wrong).

 

Deep fried sounds good to me.  The only time I've had them is canned in oil, don't think they get imported frozen here, certainly not in general anyway.  I was young and innocent and my mum told me they were small chicken wings.... I now know the value of her laughter.  I have kids. Muahaha!

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #13 of 13

A risotto (my Northern Italian grandpa's recipe):

Detach the frog meat from the bones.

Use the bones, a bay leaf and salt to prepare a broth.

Brown a white onion finely chopped and the frog meat in butter, add the rice (Carnaroli) and brown it for a while, than add half a glass of white wine, let it fade away, add the broth a few at time till the risotto is done.

You will need a lot of frog legs, for example for 4 persons you should use 320-350 grams (a little less than 1 1/2 cup) of rice and half a kg (1 pound) or more of frog legs.

When you'll detach the meat from the bones, the meat will be very little.

My homemade Italian Liqueurs and Pastry recipes at: http://italianliqueurs.blogspot.com.es/

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My homemade Italian Liqueurs and Pastry recipes at: http://italianliqueurs.blogspot.com.es/

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