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Bread & butter--what's your twist?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I stopped eating bread and butter for the longest time, but since I started baking my own bread, it somehow became so much more appealing.

I wanted bread and butter the other day, but I wanted something a little more. I ended up cooking minced garlic & ginger & lemongrass in butter & olive oil, with a touch of sea salt. It was so tasty poured on a slice of bread!

Does anyone have a unique, tasty twist to bread & butter that they cherish?
post #2 of 18
recipe:
ingredients:
bread
butter
method:
Slice a nice thick slice of bread, preferably still warm, but cold or toasted is good too.
spread butter on the bread.
eat

i really can;t top that :)
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #3 of 18
I can, but only by specifying a bit.

Butter: use European-style cultured unsalted butter

Sprinkle with a very small amount of good salt -- doesn't have to be fleur de sel or something, but it should be semi-coarse and have a small amount of flavor of its own.

Bread: there it's utterly a matter of individual preference, and I for one am not going to weigh in on a debate there. But since you make your own, you have your own opinion.
post #4 of 18
French bread
French butter, preferably Bridel (the version with the small salt crystals in the butter)
post #5 of 18
Warm bread
Irish butter
freshly grated sea salt
uber thinly sliced mini radishes

And if you really wanted to get fancy make it an herbed butter.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 18
Pan fried bread dough (do a semi deep fry) in lard then smothered in butter while still hot. Cinnamon and sugar are optional. Haven't tried it with garlic etc but that would be tasty too! :D
post #7 of 18
I just started baking bread myself. I must say, I love it!

My tasty twist is not to get set on one type of bread...or butter.

Since I started baking bread a couple of times a week, I figured it would be a great opportunity to start trying different butters. I've hit on a pretty good number of different butters such as Plugra, Clover, Lurpak, Kerry, Delitia Parmigiano Reggiano Butter, Burro di Bufala just to name a few.

The winner so far? It's so hard to say. They all really have their own characteristics that make their taste unique from each other. Well, with the exception of the Land 'O lakes and regular generic brands which were a few notches down on the flavor and texture categories.

I've also found some good sales and prices too. I do like the nuances between brands, but I don't think I'll be using these butters in everyday cooking. Instead I use them like finishing salt. So I suppose I would use these better butters as a finishing butter.

I say mix it up! Try all different breads with all different butters.

yum yum!
dan
post #8 of 18
Martins Potato bread Toasted till DARK and topped with fresh Amish hand churned butter. Its GREAT to live in central Pa.:roll:
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #9 of 18
I really can't stand unsalted butter on bread, or anything else for that matter.:(
post #10 of 18
i'm with you, indianwells. Here in italy it's standard, and i don;t get the big deal. I find it goes rancid much sooner and is pretty much tasteless. If i could get some without that rancid tinge i might enjoy it with salt on it, (that's what i do when i go to someone's house who doesn;t have salted butter) but i still find it less good tasting.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #11 of 18
This is sort of the point, actually. Salt is a preservative, and it makes butter preserve longer. When dealing with unscrupulous merchants and producers, as one usually is in the U.S., one way to ensure freshness is to use unsalted.

The other advantage to unsalted is that you can salt as and when you need.

On the whole, yes, butter on bread needs salt. Since I never use salted butter for anything but butter on bread, I just put salt on my butter.

If you cannot find sweet, non-rancid, i.e. fresh unsalted butter, you're looking in the wrong markets. I certainly had fair bit in Tuscany, and I'm sure it's available elsewhere in Italy.
post #12 of 18
I was going to post the same comment. There's a particular salt that I like and a couple of butters ... very nice on warm, whole grain bread, especially home made or from some of the artisan bakers around here.
Lance
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Lance
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post #13 of 18
You want bread and butter? I got your bread and butter right here:

http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/pastr...key-bread.html

That's some bread and butter.

BDL
post #14 of 18
My grandma's strawberry jam on top of the butter. Nothing like a thick slice off the end of a warm loaf slathered with butter and jam. Apple butter or honey would be close seconds, or tomato jam. Only a memory now as my grandmother has been gone for many years. For what it's worth, her jam recipe is as follows: Bring equal parts (by wieght) strawberries and sugar to a boil. Boil 5 min. Pour into bowl, cover with a clean dish towel and allow to cool. Stir occasionally. When cool, put in sterilized jars and seal with melted parafin. So simple, but you wouldn't believe how good it was. Maybe it was just because she was the one who made it.
post #15 of 18
i love butter but for me, it's too subtle on bread. i prefer roasted garlic and olive oil.
post #16 of 18
Most bread is just a good excuse to enjoy good butter. :lips:

Usually I prefer a European (cultured) unsalted butter, but any butter will do in a pinch.
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post #17 of 18
When I used to bake bread more often I would just eat it with butter, can't get sick with that... but since you are how about abandoning butter altogether for a nice hummus, or baba ghanoush?
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #18 of 18
How about this....dark sour rye, chilled bacon drippings and crunchy sea salt?

Oh no, now I have to go to the bakery... :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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