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The fire inside?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Hello all,
I just truned 23 on the first of the month. I've been at my job for over a year and a half. I finished my apprenticeship, been to college. Working in kitchens for 5 years now. That beeing said, in the past 4 or 5 months I think I might of lost my fire inside. My resone for cooking. The thing other than a pay check that makes me get up. At work I'm so dull, I make the same boring menus an for the most part cook with some lack luser.
The other night I meat a new woman and brought her home. I made us dinner. I had fun. I was cooking and just had a blast showing off. I know I love to cook and just need the fire inside relite so to speak. So I guess what I'm asking hear is,...... when YOU GET IN TO A FUNK AND DON'T WANT TO COOK FOR A LIVEING WHAT DO YOU DO, TO RELOVE IT???
post #2 of 12
You need a change.... sounds like you are single, so moving on the a different food venue is the best way....

Cruise ships?

Yacht Chef?

Anything that gets you back to the creative and learning something new side.
I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
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I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
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post #3 of 12
At 23 I could put everything I owned into a Ford Escort Wagon. I was a nomad and spent 9-12 months in a kitchen and then moved on I found and went to the newer up and coming chefs, got a job and stayed to learn and then did it again. It was a great way to travel the country, earn some money and keep it going. A change of scenery and venue may be what you need. Learn a new cuisine, do you have a Passport? Travel and cook your way around. Do it while you are young and single.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #4 of 12
Get yourself a list of all top rated places in France. Walk into them and volunteer to work for free, explain to them you want to learn their way. I found most of the owners quite receptive. You are young, have no responsabilities so do it now. I did it 40 years ago and never regretted it, I worked my way from Paris all the way up to the Italian border and had a blast and learned a heck of a lot.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #5 of 12
Just go abroad InABox...

I just turned 23 as well and now find myself in a position where i have nothing holding me down i.e. gf/rent/car payments... i have an opportunity to go work in europe and im gonna take it. Many many people have been telling me that i gotta do this stuff while im young cuz options like this dont last.... but im excited and hesitant at the same time, on one side i am gonna be leaving everyone i know for at least a good 2 years but at the same time i wont have any distractions and i can concentrate on learning the things i have to learn in order to progress in my career.... even tho foreign girls are quite distracting as well haha.. i am looking forward to taking it in as a great life experience.. you only live once..
post #6 of 12
You know, some times you got stick stuff through. Cooking pays for my house, My Audi A4 and a myriad of other things (i.e. 24 weeks a year living in hotels and flights for free).

The hard thing is starting out. Sometimes you got to suck it down. You have to balance out the eventual benefits. Whatever you do however, you cannot regret.

Did i say i got hang out with Eric Bana earlier this year?
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #7 of 12
Hey Nick! Hi! :)
post #8 of 12
Funny. that was 23 years ago for me and I DID put everything I owned in a Ford EXP and moved to Atlanta. Actually at this time back then I was on my second job there. Things just didn't work out in a transfer with a major theme restaurant and I found myself getting in on the ground floor of something very beneficial to me...at the time that is.

There's going to be times that you run across this every so often in your career. It's the psychological equivalent to brakes. If you didn't have this happen you'd end up burning out too quick. Believe you me, I've been there more than I care to admit.

So....speaking from experience, the thing to do is stay focused on your current goals while expanding future ones. Just remember to be reasonable. Set some easy goals for the short term that tie into a couple more complex for the long. Make them clear and attainable goals and talk to your bosses, etc and game plan. You have to be sure that before you start anything, there has to be a place for you in the future. If not maybe it's time for a change of scenery.

Take a good look at your surroundings and reflect. Reflect on your performance, demeanor, living conditions and relationships. Then you can see where everything falls in with your goals. Make changes where you need to and go from there.

It's easy to for someone like myself to look back and give advice like this. It also sounds far more simple than it actually is. You'll definitely run into several challenges and setbacks as you progress but the one thing you have to remember is that no matter what happens, good or bad, you learn from it all and keep moving forward.

Most I've said in a while but I believe it was worth saying.;)
post #9 of 12
I share the same sentiments. My Pop always said...."Stop the world for 3 or 4 weeks, lose yourself in work, and let a little time pass". Its always held true. Life was never meant to be perfect. The most that you can ask for is that your happy, as a general rule, doing what you do most days. Don't mean to be a downer. Look for the good things, you'll find some. Look for the bad things, you'll find some. Better to look for the good things. Most of the older members here are lucky enough to be tied down with a good business, job, or family. I'd be lying if I said there weren't times when I'd like to pick up and just go. Just the other day, I heard through the grapevine the chef's job at Grayfield Inn on "Cumberland Island" was up for grabs before the end of the year. 15 years ago, I would have been begging for it.
Good Luck! And yes....travel.....what reason have you not to.
post #10 of 12
no matter what happens, good or bad, you learn from it all and keep moving forward.



OR you are destined to learn it again and again and again until it takes and you change.


Throughout my culinary life, outside public service which involved food and creating supportive programs for people in need...in many times where my paying gigs were getting dull this gave me a blast of energy from making a difference. Giving back to your community comes back to you ten fold.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #11 of 12
its happened to me before you need a rest in my opinion and a change of scenery have two weeks off if you can spend some time resting and cooking something at home to me its totally diffent to cooking at work i never really get chance t cook at home so if im on holiday i like to enjoy my cooking you dont have to do anything complicated just take time to enjoy some thing even if its just making a fresh mayonaise with some new potatoes just get back to what you used to love about cooking taking some time over something so simple to me is beautiful its what cooking is all about to me hope this helps
post #12 of 12
I think a new kitchen with a new menu will work wonders for you. And when that gets stale, do it over again. Look for challenges. You will learn more and expand your knowledge base.
"To be a good chef all you got to do is lots of little things well" -Marco Pierre

"As far as cuisine is concerned, one must read everything, see everything, hear everything, try everything, observe everything, in order to retain in the end, just a little bit." -Fernand Point
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"To be a good chef all you got to do is lots of little things well" -Marco Pierre

"As far as cuisine is concerned, one must read everything, see everything, hear everything, try everything, observe everything, in order to retain in the end, just a little bit." -Fernand Point
Reply
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