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The $1406.00 ham

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Today at work they brought in a Ham from the hills of spain. It is aged in caves minimum of 5 years. Looks flatter then Prossuitto 17 pounds weight cost $1406.00. Oh yea that includes the special carving stand($49.50) We have a party Saturday pm and I will carve it paper then on the floor. It works out to $82.70 per pound. WHO SAYS THE ECONOMY IS BAD??!!!!!!!!! The name of ham is "Jamon Serrano''and at that price it deserves a name.
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post #2 of 25
There was a thread about this type ham recently, although I don't recall the price being mentioned....goodness...Dh and I don't spend that much on Christmas for the whole family, even in the good times !! Looks like the economy is bad only for some folks.
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post #3 of 25
No matter how bad the economy, there will always be people with way too much money on their hands...that would not be me though!:D
post #4 of 25
Where is the Jamon Serrano from? Most of the Jamon Serrano (even the "reserves") aren't near this expensive. But they aren't aged 60 months either. I'd be interested in the maker and type. At 17lb I would imagine it's bone-in, which would raise the price/lb a bit higher. Did you try the ham? Do you know what type of pigs, or the feed used?

I've tried two different grades of Iberico ham and they were both amazing in the depth of flavor, mouthfeel, oils. The Iberico Belotta cost $170/lb in my area. While this is certainly a ton of money I don't look at it as a price per pound issue. I look at it as a total cost issue. Would I rather buy a few slices of Iberico ham for $10.00 or a whopper meal deal for near the same price. Well, you know what I choose ;)


dan
post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
It is bone in Iberico, festa? Comes from black pigs relative of wild boar. The ones from white pigs are cheaper. Ill get a taste Saturday night when I cut it. At this price I figure they must be feeding the pig with gold covered food. It comes in molded on outside white non harmful I assume. As it ages fat turms yellow then it best to eat.
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post #6 of 25
Sheesh!

Hey look at it this way. Cheaper than saffron. :D
post #7 of 25
That is really expensive but how did it taste? Can you post some photos in the photo gallery?
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post #8 of 25
Thread Starter 
NICKO!
If you go online to Spain Hams you will get a web site from them. I have not tasted it yet but am looking foward to it this coming Saturday. They do have some cheaper, but not that much, but they are from different type hogs and are not aged as much. From what I understand wars have been waged over these hogs?:lips:
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post #9 of 25
I second the photo request.

I'd be interested in seeing what this ham looks like whole, cut and the special carving stand it came with.

That's an impressive ham. Even I don't come with my own special carving stand.
post #10 of 25
Chef Ed, I think by calling it a "Ham" you are doing it an injustice. Most Americans think of ham in the sense of a leg like you see at the Honey Baked Ham places. This is far from that in both looks and flavor. It is very hard to describe(I was just at Zingermans and had some of the Iberico)but there is nothing quite like it to grace the earth. The pigs are generally fed chestnuts, corn, milk.... very fatty foods to sweeten them and give them the nutty flavor they are known for. Enjoy it, I know I do :bounce:
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #11 of 25
post #12 of 25
ChefHow,

I'm in the Ann Arbor area as well and I love the Jamon Iberico. I was there the day they unveiled the bellota grade. Zingerman's has, I believe, been the first to import both the grades they have for retail.

Chesnuts? I was informed they ate mostly acorns, I think it says this on the episode of No Reservations where Bourdain travels to Spain and has some.

I also have done the 1 oz. Iberico lunch thing. It is so rich and satisfying that I feel about an oz and a half is the perfect lunch... may not be a lot of volume but off the charts on pleasure.

The bellota has a much more nutty, earthy flavor than the grade they previously had which I felt was a little more fruity.
post #13 of 25
I had 3slices while I was there with some fresh bread, manchego and domestic olive oil for lunch and then had about 1/2 oz sent home and enjoyed it with some figs, dates, white truffle oil, the zingersmans 30yr old Balsamic, bread and 72% chocolate.

It is a special treat that everyone should be lucky enough to experience at least once in a lifetime.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
In my other post I did say it looked like a flat prossuitto, which it is almost like. In fact they even compare it to prossuitto ham.:talk:
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post #15 of 25
At that price you need to be certified to carve the thing!
post #16 of 25
ossa bow hogs? Cane River in Chapel Hill NC raises them.....several MO farmers have had chefs request special diets, a couple are raising red wattles for chefs/consumers.

I was wondering what you would eat with that pig.....bread works....manchengo, marcona almonds, membrillo on the side.....possibly some pears.....

So, Ed what are you serving with this special piggy? Bet you are sharpening that knife to a razor sharp edge. Hey, aren't you retired? how did you get the pig carving gig?
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post #17 of 25
Wonder how those hocks would be in some black eye peas?

I still sort of remember some of the ham we had in France and Germany, the kind of stuff that the FDA will not allow into the states. What a shame. It was SOOO good.

Just checked my accounts on line, I don't have $1400 in my ham budget. Drat.

mjb.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #18 of 25
Thread Starter 
I do some part time gigs for the Everglades Club on Palm Beach Island,(Real Upscale) keeps me active and up on new things. Tried to fully retire, could;nt do it.got antsy.

From what I gather it goes simply with $80.00 a gal. olive oil(even though the ham is oily) and toasted wedges of focassia, chiabotta ans some sun dried toms. This is what the host wants. Hope he does not want leftovers to go. HA HA .:lol:
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post #19 of 25
So what do they do with the rest of the pig?
post #20 of 25
One of the places in Chicago (Carnivale) serves it with truffle oil drizzled on top. With the fat/oil content of this meat and how soluble the fat is at low temperatures (the fat literally melts in your mouth or hands)...I just can't see pairing it with olive oil or truffle oil. There is just too much distinct flavor to mask it with any other flavors. But that's just my preferences :rolleyes:

I actually prefer to have the bread or cheeses etc. served along side of the "naked" Iberico. Maybe paring it with Iberico cheese (Made with 50% sheep, 30% goat, and 20% cow's milk) a version of Manchego.

I don't go up to Chicago too often...but I'm finding it hard to go there without picking up a couple of slices of Iberico ham. Both the Belotta and Pata Negra are very good, and (I think) distinctively different enough in flavors where trying both is a good idea. On the same note...I'm still also impressed with the petit Jesu salami. It was actually very "iberico" like in depth of flavor and oil/fat. Similar...but not the same.


dan
post #21 of 25
Kuan.....bbq silly:lol:

Gone fishin'....my thoughts exactly.....why would you get a primo product and adulterate it with so many flavors. Straight up or very non obtrusive bread. For some it's just a pricey novelty that they get special brownie points serving to friends and more importantly clients.....throw some shtuff with it that would make sense to serve with a much lesser ham and viola! special.:D:cry::(:confused: I'd like a smilie that hits it's head with a hand.....;)
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post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
:lol:You can buy Hocks for $25.00 pound???ake one heck of a soup. Food cost only $4.50 a bowl...:lol:
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post #23 of 25
I'm (not) ashamed to say even in this economy, I pay 60$ for ~2oz of it...more frequently than I should...at my favorite restaurant.

it's gooooooood.

restaurant sells them whole, just like pictured (i posted about it a little whle back) with the stand and knife.....same price as ed mentioned. If I had one in my house....i'd love to pick at it every 5 minutes....
post #24 of 25
jamon iberico is worth every penny in my book! down to the hoofs!!!
post #25 of 25
Looking at the picture made me hungry... I love cured meats. We do a "procciuto" of duck breast where I work. It's amazing, but I really want that Serrano.
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