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Difference in salts?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
ok, so I know there is a difference, but what is the biggest differences?

I just ordered the following online...

Hawaiian Red Salt
Hawaiian Black Salt
Fleur de sel w/herbs
Fleur de sel w/citrus

also, getting a sample of some New Zealand Organic and some Himalayan pink salt

and also, what are the best uses for these if they differ?


<First time poster, long time reader> :D
post #2 of 13
Hawaiian Red Salt
Rich in the minerals found in the waters surrounding the Hawaiian Islands

Hawaiian Black Salt
They call this lava salt, and its got a dusty charcoal on it

Fleur de sel w/herbs
sea salt with herbs

Fleur de sel w/citrus
sea salt citrus flavored

also, getting a sample of some New Zealand Organic
I thought all salt was organic

and some Himalayan pink salt
THat is salt mined from the Himalayan mountains
post #3 of 13
[quote=DReed3;250877]ok, so I know there is a difference, but what is the biggest differences?

I just ordered the following online...

Hawaiian Red Salt
Hawaiian Black Salt
Fleur de sel w/herbs
Fleur de sel w/citrus

also, getting a sample of some New Zealand Organic and some Himalayan pink salt

and also, what are the best uses for these if they differ?

Biggest difference is price.~!!!!
In my humble opinion Total Insanity, throwing your hard earned money out the window. Either non iodized, sea, or kosher thats all we use . All the stuff you have would be good to bake oysters and clams on so they dont tip over. :talk:
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post #4 of 13
Apart from fleur de sel.... I've never heard of the others.

I use Maldon Sea Salt ... it's recommended by many of the UK's best chefs, including Ramsay, Oliver and Blumethal. It has a really good flavour and adds to dishes, particularly cold dishes.
post #5 of 13
well, having done gone and did throw some money out the window to make my own decision,,,,

yes, there are differences.

>>best for

only one clue: you will only notice differences where salt is a pronounced taste in the dish and the dish has no overwhelming flavor elements.

delicate white fish
oven hot bread and butter with salt or compound butter
prosciutto and salted melon
french style non-browned curd omelet

superdooper sea salt on anchovies? not never likely to notice. . .
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much guys! My gut told me that they may be a bit "gimmicky"...but I wanted to try. I didnt buy alot of any of them, so I'm only out of pocket like $40 for all of it, including shipping...and it was my sisters money that she had "found" in her PayPal account
post #7 of 13
Organic salt? Salt is a mineral, a rock, in what respect would 'organic' be applied to salt?

The differences in salt is basically what sort of grain size and crystal structure is involved. Salt is white, other coloration depends on what other dirt is mixed in - er, I mean, what special local minerals enhance the natural essence of the salt.

The flavored salts do sound interesting. Garlic salt is probably the most used seasoning in my kitchen. The citrus flavored stuff ought to be fun to play with. A pound of shrimp 'cured' for 15 - 20 minutes with about a tablespoon of citrus salt and a tablespoon of sugar could be nice, especially if grilled on skewers with some lemon wedges.

In general, though, it seems to me that these various exotic salts would be overwhelmed by other flavors if used during cooking, and are best suited to being used as finishing salt at table.

mjb.
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post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 

convienently

convienently I have a pound of those "BIG" shrimp my mother-in-law brought me from Miami a last week! Its in the freezer screaming at me to do something with it everytime I open the door... :smiles:
post #9 of 13
Big frozen shrimp opening their mouths and screaming at you? Man, sounds like a Stephen King thing.
post #10 of 13
Big Shrimp.
Sounds like military intelligence.
An oxymoron.

Or is oxymoron pimple cream for stupid people?


What others have said, use it at the table to add finishing flavor to your dish.
It would be lost on strong flavored foods.
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post #11 of 13
The colored salts have color because of impurities, and those impurities lend some taste.

Fleur de sel is a particular type of sea salt. What makes it "particular" is the the structure of the flake, which has is particularly thin -- so has a lot of flavor for weight.

Flake (as opposed to grain) type salts, tend to dissolve more slowly in liquid. So they're good candidates for seasoning meat surfaces before cooking -- as part of a rub for instance. This resistance to going into solution combined with their tendency to draw liquid from meat is what makes kosher salt kosher. Kosher salt is neither blessed nor holy in any way -- it's just the type of salt used in the process of koshering.

Salt in solution is salt. It doesn't matter how expensive it is, once it's dissolved it's no different from any other. However, as a finishing seasoning different salts do taste differently (as a result of impurities), or dissolve at different rates, or give more saltiness for less salt, and so on.

Hope this helps,
BDL
post #12 of 13
BDL
You are correct on salts and colors, but although not blessed or anything like that Kosher Salt is used because as you know when kashering ,bird feathers singed off, then cold water then K=salt and it sits draining till blood and impurities comes out, then cold water rinse again. Many years ago it had to be used in 24 hours or rekoshered.The size of the crystals in K.salt are larger and wont fade away as fast as table salt therefore will take out more before it is rendered inaffective. This is the logic my Rabbis always told me.It make sence. :)
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post #13 of 13
One of the big differences in salts is how the crystals are shaped and
sized. NaCl is cubic (and is sometimes found in spectacularly cool
perfect clear cubes, several inches a side.), but the stuff you use
to cook with is made of a large number of small cubes, and comes in a
variety of shapes. Many sea salts are hollow, for instance. That means
that if you measure by volume (with a spoon, cup, or pinch) you'll get
less salt than a similar measure of regular table salt. I had some
fancy French sel de mer which was a *third* the density of Morton's
table salt. So if you put a teaspoon of the French stuff in something,
you'd have only a third the sodium as a teaspoon of Morton's. (which is
close to solid.) Typical is only ten or twenty percent less dense, 1.7
g/cc v. 2.0 g/cc for granulated salt. There are also salts treated with
sodium ferrocyanide (also called yellow prussiate of soda by old timers),
which prevents the salt from forming normal crystals, and results in
porus crystals.

Picking the right salt is big deal for people designing processed foods
for packaging, as the mechanical and surface area/volume ratios matter to
lots of industrial processes. For most cooks, it doesn't.
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