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So I got this tenderloin kinda roast thing...what do I do with it..

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Whole tenderloins were on sale last week, so after carving up a few filets (and some petite filets) I used the skinny end for some asian inspired lettuce wraps, and had a few filets when we had a guest over...

I'm left with a few filets frozen that I know I'll use soon, but I have this head end that I trimmed up, took out all the silverskin and tied it up all nicey nice...it's defrosting in the fridge now, what should I do with it? Stuff it with some garlic and just some simple spices, sear, and roast?



The bigger hunk there is what i plan on-a-roastin'




any ideas for rubs or anything? just going to serve it with some roasted baby potatos and blanched string beans....nothing special, but wanted to hear if you guys had any idears.
post #2 of 13
I'd probably just rub with salt, pepper and garlic powder, broil, rest and then smother the slices with bearnaise. Or if feeling a bit more adventurous, maybe stuffing it with some crab meat first.

mjb.
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post #3 of 13
Take some coffee grinds, chili powder,(or guajillo if you have it), garlic, onion, cumin, corriander, cinnamon and S&P and rub it down. Throw it in a hot pan and sear it and finish in the oven. Deglaze the pan with a combo of beef stock and a little coffee and reduce.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #4 of 13
Nice knife. Messermeister?
post #5 of 13
Thread Starter 
Misono UX-10

chefhow, thanks...that sounds good.
post #6 of 13
MURPH>
Since this is a very tender cut, I really don't recommend long roasting. I would handle it like normal, which is I rub with fresh oregano, thyme s&p , a little oil in a saute pan, sear it all around then finish in oven in same pan(no Plastic handles.)
Take it out let it sit awhile, deglaze pan and make whatever sauce you want. I use a lot of shallots and Fresh Garlic, parsley, wine or brandy, some stock dash worchestire,dash heavy cream. Comes out great everytime. No fancy this or that just good eating.

PS... You take great Photoes..:talk:

I use coffee grinds in my garden, not on my steaks.!!
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post #7 of 13
Wow that's a nice knife! :) If it were me, tonight, I'd serve it with bearnaise and a good California Cabernet.

Edit: So basically you're making chateaubriand. Chef Ed is saying make some sort of Chateaubriand sauce without saying Chateaubriand sauce and I'm saying make Chateaubriand.
post #8 of 13
I agree with Kuan. You have here a chateaubriand. Roll it lengthwise in a kitchen towel, tightly, and then pound straight down to flatten it against the grain -- it should turn into a fat, wide steak with the grain in the same direction as the fillets and tournedos.

Sear the outside, finish in the oven until rare, serve with salad, good red wine, and a loaf of excellent bread. Very romantic. A sauce is traditional, and there are a wide range of choices. But don't cook it long, or roast as such, or braise, or anything like that: chateaubriand should be pretty much the pinnacle of tenderloin steak dining, not something to turn into something else.
post #9 of 13
If you want to fancy it up a bit try making a deconstructed beef wellington. Cook the steaks as steaks, cook the puff pastry seperately, spread mushroom pate on the puff pastry, place a steak on top and another puff pastry sitting askew on it. Top with a creamy peppercorn sauce.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 13
Interesting. What you folks call Chateaubriand (so does Jacques Pepin), many culinary schools do not. Chateaubriand is often described as the largest piece just before the the head. Very confusing for students. I tend to go with Jacques on this one too...
post #11 of 13
Anneke's correct. That's a pretty fancy Chateaubriand. If you trim the head correctly you could get almost the same cut. Take the muscle on both sides off. Take the section at the end of the muscle with that sheath of skin off. Only people very familiar with the whole tenderloin will know the difference.
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
I didn't even take the 2 side muscles off, just trimmed them up (in between) really nice making sure to get every piece of silverskin and the icky party and then tied it up. Granted it's a pretty wimpy, "eh" quality tenderloin. (but I got a "best steak I ever had" comment from a guest, so heck, it's not that bad quality!)

I'll let you know in a little bit how it is. :)

I paid 24$ on sale (times is hard!) for the whole tenderloin and got 6 filets, a tail section I used for fajitas and the "head"....well we'll see tonight!
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Came out great. I think I'm geting the hang of this cooking thing. took Ed's advice with some other spices on there (hey, its a not so flavorful grade of meat!)

Have a roasted garlic ciabatta longrolls for a sandwich tomorrow too.




just made a pan sauce with shallots garlic peppercorns cognac some beef stock and some cream. and some parsley.
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