ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › What fish works good for fondue?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What fish works good for fondue?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
What fish works good for fondue? To cook the fish in a fish broth in a fondue pot.
post #2 of 10
Since I dont believe anyone or any pro on this site has ever done this, why dont you try it and tell us!!!!!!!!!
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #3 of 10
gotta' admit, a fishy fondue is not the first thing that . . . well, nebbermind

but, it does exist: GourmetSleuth - Fish and Seafood Fondue
post #4 of 10
I'm kind of surprised, too. But then, why not? :confused:

The key is to use a fish that already is or can be cut into chunks and will hold together well. The ones mentioned in that link, sure -- also fresh tuna and sea scallops. Maybe even monkfish. Just not anything delicate.

Also, I think it might work better poaching in a fish fumet, rather than frying in oil, especially since it's hard to get the oil hot enough in a fondue pot using something like Sterno as the heat source. You would just have to be careful that you don't let the liquid in the pot cook down too much and burn (and stink! :eek: )
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks, good ideas!
post #6 of 10
I posted a thread a while back to say that i'd found, at last an electric hot pot. It's commonly used in the far east as a kind of fondue thing. Filled with stock, which is intensified with every addition your guests cook in it. When i was out there it was flame fired.

Anyway, Firstly you need a good stock. Not a fish stock as it deteriorates rapidly after a wee while. Make it vegetable, but really, really well flavoured. Then lots of herbs for folk to add to the stock or eat raw. Coriander (cilantro) Thai basil is a good one, Parsley (flat leaf) Kafir lime leaves (asian supermarket or dried supermarket)

Then you need chunky fish. Not flaky. I dont know what you have available, But here in Scotland i woud certainly use monkfish, prawns, scallops, lobster, Langoustines, salmon??, Fish balls are fabulous. (you can buy them at the asian supermarket or find a recipe.
Generally, one would go with a fish that doesnt fall apart easilly

We were introduced to the gagging "joy" of sea slugs ....I almost barfed Not a good choice
I would also serve lots of vegetables that cook quickly:- Mange tout, sugar snap peas, Whole spinach leaves, Carrot battons

Have also a variety of breads, (chinese pancakes (again chinese supermarket freezer section))salads and tasty dips and dressings

Finally enjoy the wonderful soup you are left with at the end of the meal
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks! Vegatable stock with herbs sounds like a good idea.
post #8 of 10
Dont add the herbs, let folk add them as and when needed
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
Reply
post #9 of 10
Sounds more like Shabu-Shabu........!
Shrimp and lobster would be great.....Dashi broth with extra aromatics as
listed in the other posts.....even tuna would be nice....just cook it lightly...
dipping sauces would be appropriate as well. A very elegant and unique way of eating to be sure. Good Luck!
post #10 of 10
Every year for a few years our family had an Asian stlye 'steamboat' at Christmas - basically mixed fish & vegetables cooke DIY style in a light fish broth ( do a wiki on 'steamboat' + 'food' or google image search 'staemboat' + 'fish' ). You serve sliced raw seafood & fish for everyone to dunk in the stock and then fish out with little individual baskets on the end of a wire. Serve with spicy dipping sauces and drink (eat) the soup after you're all done (it's really tasty after). No reason why you couldn't 'twist' this to an Italian/French/Western style with aiolis, mayonaises, oils etc as the dipping sauces..
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › What fish works good for fondue?