or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Why is my bread heavy and crust too hard?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Why is my bread heavy and crust too hard? - Page 2

post #31 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Doctor Young View Post

...PS: I did see your post about the 2-step method. That looks very interesting and makes all the sense in the world. Perhaps I will try that on the next go around.

 

For your starter, are you replenishing it with rye flour.  Once I made a starter replenished with rye and at the end of a week or two, it smelled really sour and not cheesy.

 

My strategy for yeast bread is 5 parts AP flour and 1 part rye or whole wheat flour.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #32 of 41

Hmmm. I never considered Rye Flour. I will give it a try.

 

I made one dough yesterday and through process of elimination I have decided that my dough was, and has been under-kneaded. I went to the extreme and handled it very little after a 30 minute initial rest. No Yeast. Cool proof @ approx 55 F (it has been 16 hours). And that dough is as flat as a pizza crust. Which is what I will probably use it for.

 

So now I am going to make another dough. Add a little yeast. 30 minute rest in the bowl. Then knead 10 more minutes.

post #33 of 41

Why not try doing the two-step process that I detailed.  Once the preferment is mixed with the remaining ingredients, only 20 seconds (twenty seconds 8D) of kneading is required then a 25 minute rest - followed by one or two french folds 20 minutes apart.  Final proofing and putting into the oven.

Again, I use 5 parts AP flour and 1 part of either bread, rye, or whole wheat flour.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #34 of 41

OK. I am starting to get somewhere now. The overall product was better than previous. Not as dense. The crumb was a liitle more open. The crust was crunchy, but not too hard. The taste still needs improvement. I mean it tasted OK, but I am still trying to get more tang. My wife made some cheeseburger soup, which was new for us and very good. So the bread went well with that and made french toast with the remainder the next morning.

 

As far as the bad dough that I made the previous day, all was not lost, I made mini strombollis that turned out great. Now my daughter wants me to make those on regular basis.

 

I still need to get to the store to get some rye flour for my sponge. I'll make some more bread this coming weekend. Perhaps a 3 seed Bastoni.

 

Doc

post #35 of 41

Are you in either Hayward or SL?????
 

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #36 of 41

Yep. San Leandro.

post #37 of 41

I would start using a preferment using, let's say, for my 6C loaf recipe, 1 1/4C AP flour mixed with 1C of either WW or rye.  Allow it to set overnight but not more than twelve hours.  That amount of time will allow the WW or rye to hydrate fully.  Then mix it with the remaining 3 3/4C AP flour.  Otherwise scale the combination to your preferred size.

 

But you won't get the sour flavor unless using a sour starter.  Best of luck with your efforts.

 

-T

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #38 of 41

hi, u get heavy breads and light breads.

 

If u use a levin " biga " your bread will be lighter due to the texture and high oxidation that happens.

If you make soda breads, they might be heavier, because of the use of bicarb and not yeast.

Try to use fresh yeast. Cream your yeast first with a bit water before use.

If you proof, check your humidity.

 

Regards

Ricky

post #39 of 41
deleted.

Edited by Antilope - 7/11/13 at 11:25am
post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by Antilope View Post

You can use a flour and water roux in bread baking to make a more tender, fluffy loaf. Just a flour and water roux, no oil is added. The starch in the roux also traps water and retains it in the finished bread causing it to stay fresh and moist longer.
 
...The dough is a little more sticky at the beginning of kneading, but it smooths out. There is no problem if mechanical kneading is used.
 
I've noticed a difference in my white bread, sour dough and wheat bread with this method.
 
I make the TangZhong roux in an 1100-watt microwave. Use a pyrex cup. 120-gm (about 1/2 cup) room temperature water, 25-gm (about 3 Tbsp) ap or bread flour. Mix well with whisk.
-Microwave 22-seconds. Stir, take temperature. Will be about 125-F. -Microwave 11-seconds. Stir, take temperature. Will be about 145-F. -Microwave 11 more seconds. Stir, take temperature. Will be about 155-F.The roux will be thick and creamy and a translucent white color. Cool to below 130-F, mix with other wet ingredients in recipe. Proceed as usual with recipe.

 

When I began adding hot water (approx 130F) to my flour and yeast mixture, I too noticed that the dough and final crumb seemed a whole lot softer and moister.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #41 of 41

deleted.


Edited by Antilope - 7/11/13 at 11:25am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Pastries & Baking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Pastries & Baking › Why is my bread heavy and crust too hard?