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Dried Apricots!

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Recently I tried some dried, organic, unsulphured Turkish apricots. They were delicious, and their texture was soft and silky smooth. Mmmmm .... best dried 'cots I ever had.

It would be nice to try a few recipes using them. Any ideas? Not interested in jams, jellies, or sweet things ... Thanks!
Lance
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Lance
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post #2 of 9
A few things come to mind - apricot chicken, apricot bbq sauce, wrap in some streaky bacon and grill/bbq.

Maybe could be used in stuffings with meats that can take sweetness like chicken and pork. Try a Google search for recipes... I'm sure there'll be lots out there.

Of course they are great in trail mix.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi Sunshine,

I've not been much of a fan of bacon, but recently I've discovered some great, very lean bacon that I like, so wrapping the dried apricots in it sounds like a nice experiment. Thanks for the idea.

I'll play arpund withthe stuffing idea. Saw a recipe where a beef tenderloin was opened up and rolled around a mushroom filling - maybe something like that with pork tenderloin and a filling with apricots. I've barbequed pork (not grilled) with apricot wood, and that worked out well.

Happy Holidays!
Lance
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Lance
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post #4 of 9
Many tagines use dried apricots, Lance, as they're a natural compliment to lamb and chicken.

Fiona Dunlop's The North African Kitchen, for instance, has three such recipes. Ghillie Basan, in Tagine. Spicy ste4ws from Morocco, has two, one with lamb and one with chicken. And in her classic CousCous and Other good food From Morocco, Paula Wolfert has a tagine of lamb, apricots, and honey.

Too bad you're not interested in sweet things. Turkish cuisine uses apricots a lot for that purpose, such as kremali kuru kayisi tatlist---apricots stuffed with cream and pistachios.

Apricots are used in savory dishes throughout the Indian Ocean rim, in everything from curries to pilafs to poultry. Adreas Viestad, in Where Flavor was Born, for instance, presents a Persian dish of squab with coriander, cumin, and apricots. I've made it subbing cornish game hens for the squab, and it's really good.

If any of these sound appealing let me know and I'll type out the recipes.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
The spicy stews from Morocco sounds interesting. I may have the Paula Wolfert recipes somewhere, so no need for you to type them out at this time.

Just so you know, the recipes are not only for me, but for a diabetic who has problems regulating her blood sugar levels, so I'm trying to stay away from sweet foods and those with higher amouts of carbohydrates. The dried apricots already contain a fair amount of sugars in various forms. In addiotion, I personally don't care much for desserts and sweet foods, much prefering savory and less sweet items, although chocolate and ice cream are well liked and enjoyed.

That sounds great! Thank you so much.
Lance
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Lance
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post #6 of 9
I fully understand, Lance. I'm married to a type II diabetic myself.

Here's the squab recipe:

Squab with Coriander, Cumin, and Apricots

2 cloves garlic
2 tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp coriander seeds
1 tsp dried mint or 1 tbls finely chopped fresh mint
2 tsp finely grated orange zest
1 tsp grated fresh turmeric or 1/2 tsp powdered turmeric
1 cardamom pod
1 tsp salt
1 tsp black peppercorns
1 tbls chopped parsley
1 tbls butter at room temperature
2 tsp honey or sugar
2 squabs or spring chickens (or substitute game hens)
1-2 tbls vegetable oil
1 onion, finely choped
1/2 lemon, cut into 4 wedges
2/3 cup shelled pistachios
4-5 dried appricots, coarsely chopped
2 cups water

Combine the garlic, cumin and coriander seeds, mint, orange zest, turmeric, cardamom, salt, peppercorns and parsley in a morar or a food processor and crush with a pestle or process until you have a coarse mixture. Add the butter and honey and mix well.

Rub the squabs with the spice mixture. Let marinate for 15 minutes to 1 hour at room temperature or up to 24 hours in the refrigerator--the longer the better.

Heat the oil over medium-high heat in a pot just big enough to hold the squabs. Saute the onion until it is fost. Remvoe the onion and sear the squabs over medium-high heat for 5 minutes, turning to brown on all sides.

Turn the squabs breast-side up in the pot. Add the onion, lemon wedges, pistachios, apricots and water and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium-low and let simmer, covered, for 1 hour or until the squabs are tender.

Remove the lid and transfer the squabs to serving plates. Simmer the cooking juices over medium-high heat for 5 minutes, or until somewhat thickened. Serve with the squabs.

From "Where Flavor Was Born," written by Andreas Viestad, Chronicle Books, 2007
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 9
>The dried apricots already contain a fair amount of sugars in various forms.<

Maybe even more than you think, Lance?

I went over to the composition of foods database to figure what those cream & pistachio stuffed apricots would run. Way too much, even for a special treat. They come in at about 18 carbs each.

But the apricots alone don't come cheap. Dried apricots come in at 82.9 grams of carbohydrate per 100 grams. I didn't have any on hand, but did have some figs. Weighed them and, with a little Kentucky windage, I figure 100 grams would be about 10-12 apricots; a net of 8.2 to 6.9 grams each.

Between that and some of the other ingredients, even the sauce for the squabs can come in pretty high, as that recipe is designed for two servings. If we go with the lower of my guesses, and only use four apricots, that's a net of 13.8 just from the apricots. Now add in that little bit of sugar, and the lemon, and....well, I'd do some careful figuring before making that dish. Even the pistachios, at about 23 grams, could throw the figure too high.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all that figgerin'. I'm pretty good with portion control, and over time have come up with some reasonable serving sizes for numerous dishes and ingredients. It's not just about carbs, however - often it's important to consider what else is in the dish or being eaten with the ingredient, such as fats and fiber, and to consider the glycemic index and loads, as well as the total carb count for the day and sometimes even what time of the day the food is eaten. And then there's exercise ... Also, as you may know, different people react differently to the same foods for a variety of reasons. Would that it be so simple as just what the sugar and carb numbers are.
Lance
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Lance
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post #9 of 9
>Would that it be so simple as just what the sugar and carb numbers are.<

Ain't that the truth!

But you've got to start somewhere, and a carbohydrate overload is almost never good for a diabetic. Near as I can figure (still don't know exactly how many apricots in 100 grams), that squab recipe is 86 grams of carbohydrates. Friend Wife's schedule allows her 65 for a dinner meal. Going a little over is one thing. but 30% is a bit too much.

As you say, there are a lot of factors involved. That same 21 carbs, spread out over the day, probably wouldn't affect her blood sugar. But taking them all at once could. Not to mention leaving nothing else for the balance of the meal.

It's never fun living with a diabetic. But for a foodie it can be real ****.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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