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Haute Cuisine

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Is haute cuisine dead now? i mean i love it to death, but should i be looking at more contemporary dishes?
post #2 of 9
where are you located?
post #3 of 9
Since even some culinary schools are not useing or showing people how to make stocks anymore, I would have to say yes. There are still some old timers who want to keep it alive including myself, but unfortunatly today the almighty dollar rules and high profit and low cost come first.. ViVa Las Vegas where they are trying to keep it alive
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #4 of 9
WHAT?!?!?? :confused::confused::confused::confused::confused:
post #5 of 9
2nd. all the schools around here are still doing that...
post #6 of 9
It is a shame that some culinary schools won't teach stock making nomenclatures. It really tells a lot about the quality of education one is receiving if the school will not even cover the most fundamental element to cooking.

In my opinion, Haute Cuisine is still being kept alive by several very innovative chefs. Thomas Keller anyone? The French Laundry in California and Per Se in NY are excellent restaurants that still seem to inspire and reinvent fine dining.
post #7 of 9
Haute cuisine has been officially replaced now by molecular gastronomy and some really cruddy TV personalities masquerading as "Chefs".

Good food, well presented will never be out of fashion
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #8 of 9
When you write "haute cuisine," what do you mean? To my mind, the modern "international" trend is "haute" with a number of other elements fused -- and is the better for the fusion.

If you want to cook hotel food from the turn of the last century, good luck.

Great cooking is constantly reinventing itself -- always searching for the simple and a way to make great ingredients shine. Meanwhile, unimaginative technicians get bogged down in increasingly complicated and fussy recipes trying to survive whatever is the current trend. It's hard to think of Escoffier and Pellaprat as revolutionaries fighting for simplicity and eclecticism -- but they were.

BDL
(ex-pro)
post #9 of 9
I definitely don't think it's dead. There's a few restaurants in Santa Barbara that features this type of cuisine and I work in one of them. It's not cheap of course, but it's alive. The clientelle consists mostly of older folks or those you would consider "yuppies" (is that still a word we use?).

As far as stocks go, any school that doesn't teach you the basics isn't a culinary school as far as I'm concerned. French cuisine thrives off of stock. Every culture has it's base flavors. I mean, japanese food has dashi in everything!

Haute cuisine is very exciting to me and for others as well I'm sure. If you like it, I don't think it's dead. Trends are trends...
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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