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Foods you don't make at home

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
There are certain foods that I don't bother making at home because they're too fussy, or I can get very easily at a restaurant. Onion rings are at the top, along with several other deep fried goodies. Sushi, lobster, or anything that might need a whole lot of prep and cleaning. What do you avoid making at home?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #2 of 16
When we want Chinese, it's always carry-out. We enjoy the variety of chicken, pork & beef, several kinds of rice and veggies. Plus, I just don't want to make it. My idea is that I deserve a day off sometimes. It doesn't happen too often. We're 60 miles from the nearest Chinese palace. :)
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #3 of 16
Vietnamese food, some ethnic breads like poori and pratha and naan, injera, lebanese pita, etc. :)
post #4 of 16
Mostly the fried foods.
I was happy when my boss gave me a table top fryer, but the recovery time for those things is so slow it doesn't give you the quality or volume needed to really enjoy it.
After a couple of uses it got bagged and stored.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #5 of 16
I don't make pates or terrines very often at home.
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Nicko 
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post #6 of 16
I don't "not" make things at the house, but I take shortcuts that I wouldn't take in the restaurant. Like, I don't make my own stock, I use better the bullion. And I'll cheat on sauces, instead of making a buerre fondue, for say, something as easy as steamed veggies, Id probably just put a pat of butter on them. Or instead of a using a roux, or a slurry, Ill use "wondra" flour to thicken a gravy or a sauce.

But as for dishes, I like to try any make whatever Im in the mood for. I really enjoy cooking for the family and showing them what I can do with food. But if I had to put on a finger on it, I'd say, I probably use my deep fryer the least. It gets itself up to temp pretty quickly, and doesn't take to long to recover after a batch of food, but its just such an ordeal. I need like 2 quarts of oil, maybe a little less, and then filter the oil, cant clean until its cooled down, sputters oil everywhere because the lid is so pointless to use every time. Summer time is when Ill use it.
post #7 of 16
I can't think of anything I would eat that I'd avoid making at home; certainly not because it was fussy to make. That's just not a criteria for me.

Some things require special equipment that I don't have, so would avoid making them for that reason, or because incredients aren't readily available. But those are about the only things I can think of that would stop me.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 16
Anything pickled more than overnight. I gave up on prosciutto after two smelly-ending attempts.
Don't mess with dragons. You will be crispy and taste good with catsup.
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Don't mess with dragons. You will be crispy and taste good with catsup.
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post #9 of 16
I don't make bread at home. Tbere are many superb bakeries in the area, a few within easy walking distance, and the bread they make is outstanding artisanal quality.
Lance
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Lance
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post #10 of 16
Ah yes, that was my problem when I wanted to make my own puffed rice. :lol:
post #11 of 16
probably the biggest criteria of not cooking something at home is finding a decent version out.....

pho

we started making bastardized versions of sushi when my sons decided they really like it......they fill up for a fraction of the cost of going to a sushi place.
ours are not pretty but yummmm

I'm with Kuan on alot of the ethnic breads....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #12 of 16
I would LOVE to be able to eat complicated-to-make food at a restaurant, but unfortunately restaurants here make very simple food. Which is fine, but i don;pt want to pay for a meal i can make as well or better at home. I would so love to eat something with a difficult sauce, something really complex that takes all day, but italian restaurants, or maybe i should say roman restaurants, at least those i can afford, do home cooking. Italian food is the greatest for home cooking, simple, healthy, tasty. But not heavy on the complexity of preparation. Unless you;re talking about mindless mechanical stuff like molding individual gnocchi or soemthing.
So i make pretty much anything i want, if i have someone else to eat it with. Except i don;t know how to do complex sauces, based on reductions and all, or rather, i just don;t have the time for it.

I do make breads, bagles, english muffins, all kinds of cakes, and apart from sausages and prosciutti and cheeses, i make just about everything else too. Or used to. I often have cereal for supper when no one is looking!
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #13 of 16
Before I put an item on my menu, I will make it at home first and try to perfect it. :lips:
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #14 of 16
Off the top of my head some things I don't make at home are pizza, sweet potato fries and sushi. In truth the pizza I've eaten most often the last few years is Papa Murphy's take and bake, which isn't exactly homemade. Often, however, I'll doctor it up a bit - my favorite is during late summer when I get a plain cheese pizza to go and lay on the slices of fresh, homegrown tomatoes - sometimes before baking, sometimes after, sometimes both. Culinary heaven.

Sushi, as well as sashimi, I *could* do at home and with some practice do a decent job of it. Basically I jut don't have the inclination.

As others have said, home deep fryers are nice sometimes, but just don't do the job like big commercial units. Sure, I make some decent wings at home now and again, but they don't come close to what the Wing Coop here in Salt Lake offers, for example.

On the flip side, I rarely order some things like pulled pork, chicken parm or omelettes when dining out, because what I make at home is so much better. Disappointment is not one of the goals of dining out.

One oddity is grilled cheese sandwiches. I love them, they are so simple and easy to make, offer chances to experiment with different cheeses but I hardly ever make them at home. I wonder why.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #15 of 16
Tell you one thing I always make at home. Steak. That's the one thing I really don't like eating at restaurants. You can make three for the price of one and have room to screw up even.
post #16 of 16
I'm going to agree with Kuan. I rarely order steak out. I can get a bigger steak and cook it the way I like it and it costs half what I'd pay in a restaurant.
Cheers,
texasflute
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Cheers,
texasflute
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