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Frying on Water?!

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Has anyone ever heard of a hydro fryer or water fryer? I used one before and when I did a power point presentation on it, everyone looked at me like they were confused. If anyone has used one please let me know if you liked it and the pros and cons you have encountered from using it. Thank-You.
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
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So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
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post #2 of 11
Yes and they are terrible .In fact the brand I had has stopped making them, they have no recoup and make noise all day. I am about to replace it.
CHEFED
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post #3 of 11
Ed,

But, how do you feel about it? Don't keep it bottled up now.

BDL
post #4 of 11
I would like to know more about frying on water? What type of product? Doughnuts? Beignet?
post #5 of 11
Any sort of ordinary deep frying. A volume of oil, deep enough for deep frying, is floated on a volume of water in a temperature controlled vessel. In the more advanced cookers, the oil, water, and oil/water boundary are kept at separate, "ideal," temperatures through a rather complicated and Rube Goldberg type of arrangement. In the less expensive, less complicated cookers the water and boundary temperatures are either not actively controlled at all, or not monitored as closely.

The idea is that solids sink to the bottom, through the boundary, are trapped in the water, and do not continue to cook in or pollute the oil. The principle imputed benefits are less oil lasts longer. AFAIK, there are no claimed health benefits, but only the economics and "green" of saving oil, and the implied quality benefit that an operator won't ruin food by using old oil.

My impression is that at the current technological SOTA, water fryers are either expensive, unreliable, or more usually both.

Hope this helps,
BDL
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
I agree somewhat with the replies. My limitations was that when I used the water fryer I was just a line cook therefore had no idea of the maintenance cost; as a line cook it was great we only had to change the oil maybe every other week if we were busy and once a month on a regular basis. Now if I was personally responsible for the cost of running and maintaining it, I don't know if what I save in oil cost would be worth the trouble.
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
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So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
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post #7 of 11
Rube Goldberg is an understatement. Mine was 2 seperate tanks. The oil did last about 1 week longer but not worth the smell, it was nasty. You are better off with a fryier with a built in filter that you can quick clean at the end of the day. If you want to clean one A La Minute just drop a raw egg into the fat, it will congelle and draw a lot of sediment into itself. Then remove with a chinese skimmer.:crazy:
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post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
That is cool. I have never heard of that egg thing before. I might have to try that.
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
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So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
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post #9 of 11
does the egg thing work on just water fryers or regular ones too, iv never heard of it.
post #10 of 11
All fryers Oh yea ! throw the shells in to as they catch particles in themselves
You can also use all whites only:bounce:
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post #11 of 11
After you get the egg out, chase it with a piece of white bread or a spud cut in quarters. They take the odors out of oil. If you're trying to clear fish, add a bunch of parsley, too.

If you've ever had potatoes fried in oil that wasn't quite clean -- you know exactly how much they take with them. Beaucoup plenty.

BDL
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