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Bones for Chicken Stock

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi All,

Does it do any good to save and use bones from a roasted chicken for stock? Or have the bones already given their all?

Thanks!
post #2 of 11
Short answer: Yes, you can extract flavour from the roasted chicken carcass, so don't waste if you don't want to. It will be different from a white chicken stock, however.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thank you!
post #4 of 11
Oh, absolutely! A great deal of my freezer is taken up by two things: bones that I save for stock, and the stock I make, in different-size containers for different uses (1 cup for sauces, 2 to 4 cup for soup making). And the bones I save aren't just chicken; I also save duck, fish, and meat bones, both cooked and raw. I figure: why throw away money? I've paid for the bones, let me get full use out of them. :D
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #5 of 11
I save the carcasses, also.
I also buy the 10# bags of chicken thighs when they are on sale for about $4. I roast them in a 400 degree oven until the meat is done, then pick the meat out and make stock with the bones and skin. BTW, leftover turkey bones from thanksgiving added to this stock give it a much richer flavor. I get anywhere from 8 to 14 pints of stock from this, after straining, cooling at 32 degrees in the beer fridge, and skimming the fat.
I freeze them in pint containers.
post #6 of 11
Bones (and whatever else you can save) from a roast chicken make the BEST chicken stock. It's even got a name: (wait for it) roast chicken stock. It's a little darker in color -- but other than that, it's superior to regular and white stock (white stock is made without carrots) for most applications.

BDL
post #7 of 11
I do this with my smoked barbecue ribs sometimes too for a BBQ stock. Handy for many specialty dishes from barbecue sauce to soups, stews, bean dishes and more.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #8 of 11
Don't forget that most of us roast bones before making a stock anyway. So shouldn't make a difference when the roasting takes place.

BTW, one way to save raw chicken bones is to spatchcock the birds for roasting. The backs you remove doing that go into the freezer until you're ready to make stock.

I almost always spatchcock birds, because I have two uses for the backs. One is for stock making. The other is for baiting crab traps.

To spatchcock a bird, use your kitchen shears to cut the backs away on both sides of the backbone. With chicken you may sometimes have to score the inside of the keel bone as well. Open the bird and lay it flat. With small birds---game hens, quail, partridge---it's usually not necessary to score the keel bone.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 11

File this

File this under I should know enough to keep my mouth shut... But spatchcocking means cutting out the breastbone entirely, while keeping the breast intact, and not merely taking the back bone which is part of ordinary butterflying.

The idea behind spatchcocking a bird is to get it flat enough to skewer with a pick through the breasts and another through the thighs, and grill over an open fire; or simply sit flat (without skewers) on a grate.

BDL
post #10 of 11
If you say so, BDL. But others, some with pretty strong credentials, think otherwise.

F'rinstance, Virginia Willis who is a graduate of both L'Academie de Cuisine and Ecole de Cuisine La Varenne, and has worked with chefs as diverse as Natalie Dupree (under whom she apprenticed) and Bobby Flay, and who was the kitchen manager for Martha Steward Living. She says:

"To spatchcock a Cornish game hen or other small bird, place the bird on a clean cutting board, breast side down. Using poultry shears, make a lengthwise cut on both sides of the backbone from neck to tail. Remove the backbone and save it for stock. Open the bird like a book."

Because there is so much more bone mass with a chicken, it won't always lay flat just by cutting away the backbone. And, sure, you can cut away the breastbone to demonstrate your virtuosity. But if you just score the breastbone it works just as well, laying perfectly flat on a grill or in a roasting pan, and doesn't need skewers to hold it in place.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 11
Depends what kind of stock you're making, KY. Brown stock, white stock, and so on -- they're not the same thing, they don't act or taste the same, and they work best in different applications.
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