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rough clients

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
what defines a hard to work with client?

for me:

1) not helping define the box, I can work with people that are not clear about what food they want or type of service if they provide other info.

2) someone that does not want props but wants the food to look like old cars? ok, huh? I'm trying to follow along but just not there.

3) wants lots of ideas gearred toward their party yet changes the criteria

4) not being up front with their budget

5) not being realistic about guest count

6) going off on tangents that don't have anything to do with their party's food repeatedly

7) well and there's the ever popular, wanting filet for hamburger prices....

* sorry it's been a long couple of days.....just needed to vent....
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #2 of 13
Hey Mushroom Girl! How about the ones that think they are Julia Childe and start telling you how they make it and how you should do it. I had one like that and I told her Mrs. So and So why dont you make it and I will give you a discount on the price of function. She told me she was to busy and had not made it for years. I also had a pharmacist tell me what to make . I told him ''he should be a caterer and I should mix the prescriptions and run his drugstore'' he got the hint.. One told me that the neighborhood was not that good. I told her you are not haveing a lawn party and will be in the building!! Or how about they want Kosher Style? In yiddish, I would answer them You are either Kosher or non kosher no in between!:lol: Yea I got them all
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post #3 of 13
Not true, Ed. The most famous of the New York Delis, The Stage Del and Carnegie Del are kosher style, but certainly not kosher. I did plenty of events that began with a shrimp cocktail and "Momma's Chopped Liver"...After the brisket, cabbage rolls, and stuffed derma, the client wanted NY style cheesecake.
post #4 of 13
for me:

1) either not being honest about their budget or not knowing it

2) deliberately understating a buffet guest count
post #5 of 13
Worst rough client we ever had was a hag of a mother of the bride. First negotaitons included a hors d'ouevres reception for 60 guests two hours before the event, when the time came for deposit, she went cheap and insisted that a relative would supply the appies, and we would cater the dinner. Contract was signed agreeing to this.

Day of the event I get a call 3 hours befor the event from the security guardof the hall insisting we were late and the guests were hungry. Apparantly the M.O.B was too upset to even talk to us. We get there at the time stated per contract, and the MOB and a few friends come out to "greet" us. Screaming blue murder and screaming for a 50% discount. I told my staff to stay in the vehicles an not to unload ANYTHING.

I took a deep breath and asked for the remaining 35% cheque, paid before the event started, again, as per contract. More hellfire and brimstone, with the additional words of "Lawyer" and "lawsuit". I asked the MOB to produce her copy of the contract she had signed, she refused. I produced my copy, 4 coiffed and made-up heads clustered around it, 3 slunked off and dissapeared after they read it. I told MOB if she couldn't produce the cheque NOW I would tell my waiters, cooks, food, and schtuff to turn around--again as per contract. F.O.B was dragged out of the hall and a distanced, terse, uh..conversation ensued. F.O.B. wrote the cheque, I got one of my waiters to run to a Money Mart to cash it--never mind the ridicolous cut.

Event went off without a hitch, MOB never looked in my or any of my staff's direction once.....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #6 of 13
These are Jewish Style not Kosher style. Ask any Rabbi you are either Kosher or not kosher. Jewish style refers to cuisine, kosher refers to the observance of dietary law in the cuisine.
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post #7 of 13
There's also a break between biblical kosher and rabinical kosher---a subject which can really get the feathers flying.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
well and there are those orthodox jews that go with certain markings over others.....it's been so many years since I've had to be concerned with the various different observances that it's all a blurrrrr
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #9 of 13
When it comes to the Kashruth tell me the difference. Its like saying yes you can make Kosher style stuffed cabbage useing ground beef from the hindquarter or beef strogonoff at a kosher function useing sour cream . While this could be called Jewish style stuffed cabbage, or strogonoff, cooked in the traditional way, it cannot be Kosher stuffed cabbage or strogonoff as both violate the Kashruth laws. If you are talking shrimp cocktail at a function, again it is done normally at a reformed temple but the fact that it is served to a jewish clientel does not make the food kosher. Haveing been in the Kosher Catering business in NY operating the largest kosher catering facility in the city, and having dealt with the( OU )Rabbinacal Union, I think I know a little about Kosher Catering.:smiles:
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post #10 of 13
Let's pull a quote from Wikipedia:
post #11 of 13
A strict or orthodox, even in cases conservative Jews will not eat in any of the mentioned places. Reformed will. Kosher isnot only defined by foods hindquarter,or traif, or mixing fleish and milka but also observance of the sabbeth.Closed Friday sundown to Saturday sundown etc. I still say ask any rabbi and stand by that, or call the union of orthodox rabbis for the definition of kosher(clean). As far as bacon, pork products etc. as far as Kosher, impossible. If I hung a Jewish Star outside of my deli am kosher? NO am I jewish style YES
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post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
I've catered in an orthodox temple, since I am not Jewish it was OK for me to do things the oberving members were not.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #13 of 13
I am not Jewish either my x was and my daughter is, I did however attend Hebrew school when I was Younger and befriended many rabbis who would only trust me and nobody else in the kitchens. They new I was upholding their beliefs, and since many of the laws of kashruth are based on common scence health laws, I believe in them. Not being of the faith I was asked to do many things that they could not and like you it was ok. I learned an awful lot about the religion and culture and have visited Isreal. In fact in Isreal the whole cow is deemed kosher because the butchers in some markets remove all the veins from the cow all the way thru to the hindquarter. Pigs or any thing that crawls No way, mixing dairy, meat No way. You very rrarely will see a jeish guy eat cheeseburger or glass of milk with meat sandwich, it is because of upbringing.:roll:
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