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Recipe Nutritional Analysis - Diabetics

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I cook for a diabetic and often create my own recipes. Does anyone know of a site where I can plug in the name and amount of an ingredient and get a nutritional output, especially the figures for carbs? Maybe some suggestions for getting the information in other ways .... I can figure out the carbs and glycemic index/load manually and do the math for specific recipes, but it would be nice to get something that would be faster and applicable to individual recipes. Thanks!
Lance
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Lance
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post #2 of 8
not especially impressive, but:
My Food Advisor
post #3 of 8
Hi there!

My husband is a Type 1 diabetic, so I understand where you're coming from!

We use the USDA nutrient database for carbs on on ingredients. And, it's free! You can use it online or you can download to your PC (but not if you're running Vista!) or PDA to make it more convenient. The link is:

Nutrient Data Products and Services

As far as any other hints, one thing you'll really want to have around is a kitchen scale. We always one out on the counter so that we can quickly weigh things (in grams) and estimate the carbs by an estiimate of how much starch is in each thing. For example, I made goetta today and that can be one of those thing that's hard to figure, especially since a lot of the oatmeal in it usually sticks to the pan. So, for something like that, I weigh the amount I cook and then asssume that 25% of that weight is carbs. Breads and cookies and such at higher in carbs - maybe 50% to 75%. When we're adding honey or sugar to tea or coffee, we just put the cup on the scale and weigh how much we put in and, for things like sugar and honey, we assume that the whole weight is carbs.

It's also helpful to use recipes that give measurements in weight to help you get an idea of the % of carbs in the finished product.

I hope this helps! If you have any other questions, let me know.

Good Luck!
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Someone in one of the diabetes forums I frequent suggested CalorieKing - Calorie Counter and more which, after a single, simple test drive, seems to offer a lot more than the USDA nutrient database. Thanks for jumping in and for your suggestions.
Lance
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Lance
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post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Nope, not especially impressive ... thanks anyway. See my reply to Mary for something that seems to be a little better.
Lance
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Lance
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post #6 of 8
Lance -

I gandered that USDA database - no clue about the software - if their software only produces the pdf style reports they show on the site it is probably not especially "user friendly" for your needs.

I was surprised at the number of "brand names" included in the raw data.
see:
http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcom...c/FOOD_DES.txt
post #7 of 8
Lance, I also live with a diabetic, and practically live at the USDA Composition of Foods database http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/. It's the electronic version of the old Agricultural Handbook #8.

I find it very user friendly. And it's constantly being updated, with both new data and new products added. So it's an invaluable tool for the most current info.

I've played with several others on-line, but nothing compares to this one.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
That link takes me to a different place than the earlier links. I'll look into it more closely tomorrow. Thanks!
Lance
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Lance
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