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Minced or crushed garlic? - Why not both?

Poll Results: What do you prefer (in one dish)?

 
  • 36% (4)
    Minced
  • 18% (2)
    Crushed
  • 45% (5)
    Both
11 Total Votes  
post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I have folowed many discussions, both here on the internet and by friends, about what is best; minced or crushed garlic.

What I can't understand, is why only use one method.

I often use both in one dish. For example: I crush three cloves to release as much oil as possible to get a strong flavor overall, and mince three cloves to get those small tasty garlic bits.

Just a little comment :)
post #2 of 14
You make it seems like there are 2 different schools of thought on this. I think I can safely presume that people here use both for various reasons in various dishes. Why the poll?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Yes, to me it seems that, in many cases, there two different schools.. Have read posts (not here) saying that crushed garlic taste "bitter" or something like that, and others saying that minced would taste "too much garlic". Often in discussions regarding garlic presses. The poll was just to get your upinion, but as you say, you may be a little more "pro" here at this board. The poll may not have any use...
post #4 of 14
How many people, in a blind tasting, could actually pick the difference? (assuming it is for general use, such as in a meat ragu)...
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Kiwisizzler's blog

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post #5 of 14
I cut garlic in many ways depending on the dish. Many ore ways than just two. Pastes, dices, slices, whole, crushed, roasted....
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
I can, mostly because of how much the garlic blends. If it's crushed, it blends very good. But I also like to chew on small pieces of garlic. If I remove one or the other, I will notice the difference. I have noticed though, that I often use more minced garlic then crushed in a dish. Too much crushed garlic can easely be overwhelming.

phatch,
Yes, but I was thinking that the other ways is more like variations.
post #7 of 14
I was always taught the guest should never get a piece of garlic in hits or her mouth??
Me I love it any old way.
CHEFED
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post #8 of 14
What an odd rule. Or maybe it had to do with a specific type of dishes?

For example, I love to cut garlic cloves into 2 to 4 wedges per clove, make small cuts into a leg of lamb and insert the garlic wedges, then roast or grill the leg of lamb. You can even do that with a rib eye roast (although I've never seen it done here in the U.S., it is common practice to do that in France).

I'm not too sure why or when I use crushed vs sliced vs minced, but I use all those forms and more. I don't think I've ever mixed and match several techniques in one same dish, but why not, sounds like a good idea.

What I do more and more with many dishes is put the garlic near the end of the cooking, rather than in the beginning. You'll get much more garlic flavor if it is nearly raw. Even if you add garlic at the beginning, add a little more toward the end of the cooking for added flavor.

A typical example is ratatouille, where garlic is added toward the end, a few minutes before you stop cooking your ratatouille.
post #9 of 14
French Fries, whenever I make a roast lamb or roast beef or roast pork I do the same thing. I cut slivers and insert into the meat. For the same roast I also crush lots of garlic, combine it with olive oil, salt, pepper, and other dry spices and rub it on to the outside of the roast. I like a lot of garlic.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 14
Ditto that. I like it minced for garlic bread, sliced thinly for asian style soups (now there's a broad generalisation!), crushed in dips, roast whole then squeezed out over a dish... depends very much on the dish

Then you can make a very french garlic soup - start whole then it can be left as is or whizzed and strained, depending on how you like it....

Just depends how you like it :) If you like your food more garlicky, crush it. For a whisper of flavour leave it whole....and all levels in between, vary the size of the pieces. And yet again with some salads, just the bowl is rubbed with the garlic then the garlic gets tossed...Oil infused with garlic, then the garlic removed, just the flavour remaining.

each to their own :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #11 of 14
I work in Palm Beach on Worth Avenue which is like Rodeo Drive in LA. The people we deal with are almost all millionaires and are different then us in many ways, the garlic is one of them. Like onion they are afraid Mrs Jones will smell it on their breath. Thats why they mostly drinkt:beer:Straight Vodka, No aroma!!
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post #12 of 14
It's sad to be a millionaire! :cry:
post #13 of 14
fresh vs. roasted

In a marinara I add roasted garlic in the start of the sauce and then fressh minced near the end of cooking to pump it up
.....cooking just because I can...
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.....cooking just because I can...
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post #14 of 14
It all depends on the dish I am assembling. I use both, 50% of the time.
Looking for Valentine chocolate recipes.
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Looking for Valentine chocolate recipes.
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