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Spätzle

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Let's talk...what's your recipe and what do you use, MacGuyver tool wise, to make it.

NRatched is pretty good at it, we're getting better.

Thinking about making it tonight. Anyone ever used buttermilk instead of milk?

How about using a potato ricer? what consistency do you want the batter?
post #2 of 12
I use butter milk and a potato ricer. I got a spaetzle lid for Christmas but I've not put it to use yet. There was a thread on this in the Recipe section a few months back. I don't have my recipe handy at the moment, but it's much like a THICK pancake batter.
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 12
I'm not an expert on the subject but it has been on my menu this week, so here's what I (think I) know:

- You should have a very thick batter.

- There's no reason I can think of that buttermilk won't work, so give it a go.

- I usually drip it into a pot of salted, oiled, boiling water through a mouli or colander.

Apparently (so my German Jnr Sous tells me) using this method in central Europe will result in you being called a 'cowboy' chef. The correct way to do it is to make your batter very thick, rest it 1 hour, pour some onto a chopping board (it should be thick enough not to run everywhere) and scrape long strips of it directly into your pot of water, kinda like fat spaghetti. The best way to do this is with a long metal spatula, at least 15cm long.

Anyway, I'm no expert but I'm sure someone out there is.

Happy cooking!

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post #4 of 12
Interesting. This must be one of those things where you get it right by feel.
post #5 of 12
Took a while to get the right technique and consistency, but worked pretty well in the end. Always nice to learn something new!
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post #6 of 12
aside from the physical form - long thin strips are often described as "Black Forest" style - different form from cheese doodle shapes...

the batter I would describe as 'sticky' - if it doesn't stick to everything in sight, probably too much flour/too dry - which can be a big issue when trying to squeeze it through "holes" of any sort, probably less a problem with the 'spread it out and cut off strips flicked into water" technique. there was link to a couple videos on that technique - very instructive / interesting if you want to try it.

letting it stand to ensure the moisture is fully distributed - highly recommended by me at least. in my years of attempts, working too fast produced unreliable results.

the eggs+water+salt+flour is my 'standard' - very 'traditional.
milk, leavening, no eggs, etc. - many recipes - I have tried but I always go back to the std version. obviously it's a matter of taste.

also the fresh vs. refried debate. my own preference is to make it ahead - 4-6 hours minimum - or even a full day. I think the refrigeration/cooling improves the texture - and reheating by a quick pan saute give you the opportunity to flavor it one way or the other - garlic, herbs of all sorts, bacon bits, chopped up mushrooms, etc - lots of opportunities there.
post #7 of 12
My usual recipe is milk, egg, salt, and flour, though I imagine buttermilk would work just fine. As for "shaping" them, I usually use a large, restaurant style colander. I find home colander have holes that are too small, and would think a potato ricer would make them way too small. I also have a "spatzel maker" but still like the colander method better. I have also heard of the more traditional method with "cutting" the dough (batter) but it takes way too long when preparing large amounts for restaurant use.
post #8 of 12
Herbs, bacon bits, cornmeal, sparkling mineral water, even sundried tomatoes work well.

Best thing I find is a Spaetzli sieve, very common in Euopean kitchens, virtually non-existant in N. America. This is nothing more than a metal plate with holes that sits on the top of a pot of water.

But..... (Macguyver moment here) You can make your very own:

Take a perforated pizza pan, stick a screwdriver in each hole and "lift" the hole up a bit so it resembles a very coarse grater. The holes are not sharp, and shouldn't be. Sit the pan on top of a pot of boiling water and with the palm of yor hand or a plastic pastry card scraper, force the dough through. Thinner batte will give you longer, almost noodle shape spaetzli, and thicker batter will give you round/teardrop shaped ones (which, according to my old Chef are "Knoepfli" (little buttons) not a "true" spaetzli which are scraped with a knife off of a cutting baord into a pot of boiling water)
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post #9 of 12
After frustrating myself for years trying to use a collander (holes too small, shape not condusive to scraping the batter) I bought a spaetzle maker. Essentially, it's a flat, perforated plate that sits across the top of the pot, with a sliding reservoir for holding the batter. One of the best moves I've ever made.

Although you can ring all sorts of changes, here's a basic recipe:

2 1/2 cups flour
1/2 cup milk
1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup water
2 eggs

Beat eggs lightly. Add milk and water. Combine flour and salt in a bowl. Gradually add egg mixture. Batter should be thick.

"Grate" the soft dough directly into a pot of boiling water. Cook and remove.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #10 of 12
Spatzle makers are nice. I like them too but they seem to get rusty. I'm sure if I weren't so uh, thrifty, I could get one which didn't rust.
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
NRatched and I decided to try the ricer to see...and it worked out ok. I'm going to take a drill press to a small loaf pan to get the "perfect" size that "I" like, which is between our colander and the ricer.



i gotta be honest, I don't know what recipe NRatched used for the batter.

came out good though.


post #12 of 12
When I worked in a German restaurant, we put a 6" hotel pan of water on the stove and set a 2" perforated hotel pan in it and scraped the batter through.
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