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Making recipe low fat

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I have a recipe for Cajun Chicken Pasta that calls for 1 1/2 cups heavy cream but I would like to make it more "diabetic friendly". Currently, the recipe says to saute chicken breasts in butter (i will use broth), add peppers, sliced mushrooms and green onions. Reduce heat, and stir in HEAVY CREAM, then add the spices. What can I use to replace the heavy cream, i.e., fat free half and half or fat free evaporated skim milk?

Thanks for any help you can offer this type 1, diabetic, home chef!:chef:
post #2 of 10
The evaporated milk is often used instead of cream. It cooks differently, more likely to curdle than cream. Flavor is different too as is mouthfeel.

Good low fat isn't about just swapping out ingredients. You'll need to pump up the seasoning to offset the flavors fat carries and may want to look into some additions for texture and mouthfeel.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 10
Instead of cream try no fat carnation non dairy coffee creamer liquid , I use it quite a bit and I am diabetic.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks! That sounds like a good solution. Also, I'm sure I'll have to "pump up the spices"
post #5 of 10
Cream will not raise your blood sugar to any noticeable degree when used in a dish as you describe. In fact, it's been shown that fats help smooth out spikes and help to keep one's blood sugar better regulated. It's carbohydrates that are the culprit.

Now, if you are concerned with calories because you are overweight, or if you have a cholesterol problem, that may be a different issue. I say "may" becausem again, the amount of additional calories that you'll be getting from cream over the suggestions you mentioned will be quite small.

Further, full fat milk and dairy products often contain less sugar and carbohydrates than lower fat versions. Unless you have other health issues, it's not worth worrying about.

BTW, I'm a diabetic, eat a fair amount of fatty foods, and all my numbers are excellent.
Lance
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Lance
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post #6 of 10
Be warned: the coffee creamer will impart a sweetness that you may or may not like (a main ingredient is corn syrup). Evaporated milk with just a little bit of corn starch dissolved as a stabilizer works reasonably well in some recipes where its "cooked" taste is not objectionable. But if the recipe calls for reducing the cream down significantly, you may run into serious texture problems. I've not tried the fat free evaporated milk similarly, but it's worth a try. Perhaps you can report back.
post #7 of 10
Corn syrup = more sugar = more carbs = higher blood sugar (for most diabetics, some react differently) I'd certainly not use it. According to several sources, regular corn syrup is virtually pure glucose. It has a glycemic index of 100 (on the glucose-based index).
Lance
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Lance
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post #8 of 10
I need to cater for my husband who has type 2 diabetes, he and I also have weight issues to deal with.

Where cream is called for in a dish like this, I use skim milk greek style yoghurt. I think it would suit the dish, if you like the tanginess of yoghurt.

It may well be worth looking up other dishes that call for yoghurt, as in some Indian cooking. It tastes creamy, without the high fat levels, and also has other health benefits. As with cream, don't let it boil once the yoghurt is added. It may split, but I haven't found this to be a problem.

I'm about to make a leg of lamb (trimmed of fat and "skin") that's been marinated in skim greek yoghurt, lemond rind, lemon juice, paprika, oregano, chilli and onion for 48 hours. It will be charred on the bbq grill first, then slow roasted at 160 deg C covered for about 3 hours (till internal temp. is right). Should be nice and soft. Have made up a lamb stock from lamb necks, strained, cooled, fat cap removed. Its lovely and syrupy without any sugar/flour added - looking forward to it served with baked veg and green salad. The yoghurt and lemon tendersie the meat, especially after 2 days, and add great flavour.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
The idea of using Greek yogurt did cross my mind. I love using nonfat Greek yogurt for marinating, it works very well. The "real" style Greek yogurt, that is thick is new to the commercial market around here and I have to grab it when I see it. It reminds me of the yogurt my grandmother used to make, (I'm Armenian) and we use it for everything; marinade, mixed with fruit for dessert, as a side dish with grapeleaves. Its so versitile and healthy. Thanks for your help.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Yes, the creamer is loaded with corn syrup- not a very good alternative. I just wanted to lower the fat content. I'm a type 1 diabetic, very well controlled and am always watching my weight and "numbers" on the glucometer. I've read some really good "ideas" and "suggestions" here. I might just give in and use the heavy cream, exercise extra and watch my numbers. Though, the idea someone gave about using yogurt is very tempting. Thanks!
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