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Bread Question

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi Everyone,

I always make a loaf of bread for my husband’s lunch, OK, not just for his lunch but for me too. He just informed me that my bread has been pretty dry for the last year or so be asked me why it was so moist last week. I can’t say that their was anything that I did differently. He said that it was dry again this week. What can I do to make the bread moister? I guess I never noticed it because I always toast my bread before I make my
post #2 of 9
mebbe he tripped and fell into a mud puddle on the way to work?

but seriously - post the recipe & your methods so we have a starting point . . .
post #3 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hey Dilbert,

Well the recipe is pretty darn basic.. I start out with a cup of water and add a quater cup of vegetable . Then I add a pinch of salt. For the dry ingeadience I have use thre cups of AP flou and 3 Tbs. sugar. I make a well in the flour and ad a packet of yeast. I mix the dough until a ball forms and let it do its iniitial rise. Then I punch it down and mix it again for a few minutes. Lastley I bake it in a bread machine until it beeps. He says that it suued to be perfect but it started to get dry a year or so ago.
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
This week he wants rte bread. Any tips for that?
post #5 of 9
>>bread machine

severe disadvantage here - I have not used a bread machine in a very long time. most recipes are 'tweaked' for best performance in a machine.

I am confused tho - if I am understanding correctly, you mix / knead the bread dough by hand them 'just' bake it in the bread machine?

if you have been using the same recipe throughout, two things come to mind:
- a difference in ingredients, specifically the flour - different brand? store brand? ('store' brands change suppliers, depending on costs....'brand names' seem more consistent over time)
- the bread machine 'control points' are drifting with use/age - perhaps it's baking the bread to death (too long....)

since the 'problem' is a year old, it could take a little fiddling&diddling to figure out what has changed. I can't remember what was happening a year ago <g> much less what my bread had to say about it....

on the rye bread - start with one-third rye, two-thirds white flour. using 100% "whole grain" flour - although a natural inclination - frequently makes for bricks....
post #6 of 9
I would suggest that you add a bit of honey to your basic loaf--just a tablespoon or two. The bread really won't be much sweeter than your regular loaf, and, since honey is hygroscopic, it will draw moisture to it and keep the bread moist longer.
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
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Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi dilbert,

if you have been using the same recipe throughout, two things come to mind:
- a difference in ingredients, specifically the flour - different brand? store brand? ('store' brands change suppliers, depending on costs....'brand names' seem more consistent over time)
- the bread machine 'control points' are drifting with use/age - perhaps it's baking the bread to death (too long....)



A. The brand of flour is Gold Metal.

B. I have had my machine for a few years now and I am inclined to think that the bread may be over baked and that is why the bread is getting dry.

Hi jfield,

I will give the honey a try and see how that works. Thanks.
post #8 of 9
I've never used a bread machine, so don't understand the advantages and disadvantages. But, from what you describe, you are doing all the heavy work by hand. Why don't you just bake the bread in the oven?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 9
Kelly -

does the bread machine perchance have different 'programs'? I've seen some that have different settings for different kinds of bread.

given the same ingredients & general method, I'd suspect the machine as well. making up a batch and oven baking would be one approach to 'solving' the mystery - if it bakes satisfactorily in the oven that would point to over-baking by machine.
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