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Scalloped versus mashed potatoes on Shepherd's pie

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I usually do mashed..variations of same i.e. garlic, horseradish, cheese. However, wanted
to do a scalloped potato version as the topping. So, given the pie will be in the oven for about 30-40 minutes @ 375F, do I have to partially pre-cook the potatoes or can I thinly slice and place 2-3 layers w/o the potatoes not being cooked. I will be using a little bechemel and cheese w/ the potatoes.

Thanks

Ski break
post #2 of 13
hmmmmm.....seems like you'd have serious white sauce leakage into the meat/gravy if you topped with slices of potato and bechemel.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
And your point?? LOL I said a "little" bechemel...more curious about the potatoes
Thanks for responding tho!

SB
post #4 of 13
I would do a single shingled layer of potatoes, they should be fine raw if they are thinly sliced.
I would brush with herb butter and s&p, but not too heavy, just enough to season and protect the potato.
I too would be afraid the bechamel would break, leaving it unappetizing.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #5 of 13
The Bechamel should be fine. Oftentimes a bechamel that will then be baked will have egg yolk as an added ingredient. If done properly is should not break and should not seep down into the meat. At home we often make Pastitsio, a Greek baked pasta dish. It is topped with Bechamel and I have never had a problem with it breaking or mixing with the pasta and meat sauce below.

As for the potato delimma, I think if you slice your potatoes very thin and only do 2-3 layers you should not have to precook them at all.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

Shepherd's pie mashed and scalloped potatoes

Thanks everyone!
The mandoline is ready for action!
Much appreciate all the comments and will skip the becemel..one less step!
Have some garlic infused clarified budda to coat the potatoes and of course some
fine shredded cheese....asiago, a little parma and whatever.

a bientot from Toronto Canada

Ski Break
post #7 of 13
Traditionally shepherd's pie is topped with mashed potato over minced lamb. Cottage pie, on the other hand, is made with minced beef.

I can't see why your raw, thinly sliced potato won't work on either!
post #8 of 13
Novel idea, yes I would blanch potatoes first. If possible arrange them in a overlaping spiral on the pie. You could also try without bechamel or cheese, just sliced potato seasoning and butter.:chef:
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #9 of 13
An alternative to blanching is that you can saute the slices of potatoes before layering or shallow poach in some cream or milk.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #10 of 13
Isbel, we've totally butchered the meaning of shepards pie then....

typically it's ground or shredded pot roast in thick gravy topped with shredded raw carrots, then thick layer of mashed potatoes....most often cheddar on top of that.
Cottage Pie, huh...well maybe we'll just not inform the eaters that it's a poor knock off of a British specialty.

funny that shepard's pie includes the sheep.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #11 of 13
shroomie -

definitions of things are highly flavored by locale.

go get 10,000 cooks; you'll get 9,993 "the one and only original way" definitions for "<something>"

by extension, that's an ongoing undercurrent here - seen the thread "Tone"

I'm amazed that so many people who know how to get one-click news & contact from all over the world appear to believe the entire world must obey the parochial definitions when going beyond the sign "You are now leaving Your Village"

The EU sign is standardized for the benefit of auto drivers;
recipes.... ahhhhhh, not really.
post #12 of 13
Dillbert
I took that as a thinly veiled attempt at needling me - perhaps it's because we don't speak the same English?:look:

I think it is nice to learn about the origins of dishes, even humble peasant foods like shepherd's pie. It makes TOTAL sense to call it shepherd's pie when it contains lamb, surely?

I was not 'correcting' anyone, I was just giving a little history. Oh I forgot... history may not be a relevant subject here.
post #13 of 13
not needling you - nor is your comment inappropriate. what amuses me, for lack of a better word, are posts insisting that 'the only [authentic / original / genuine] way / ingredients to prepare dish X is: ____'

if we listed out every dish known to be consumed by humans, I'd wager there are very few where the history of 'the real' dish is actually documented, and we'd find the vast majority are subject to local customs, ingredients, methods and in many cases the whim of the cook.

and none of them would be 'wrong' - shepherd's pie is a wonderful example - you can find online sources for ground and cubed "meat" of every sort - and some sources imply shepherd's pie is same as cottage pie.

certainly 'it makes sense' to call a lamb preparation shepherd's pie - the generally accepted English use of 'a shepherd' is a tender of sheep, so how did beef get in the mix?

if someone wants to call the beef variant a cowpoke's pie, is that 'wrong'? of course, if you put shepherd's pie and cowpoke's pie on the same menu, would people wonder/ask?

same thing with shroomie's shredded carrots and gravy, for example. I personally have not seen that variation in my travels, but that sure doesn't make it 'not really shepherd's pie' in my book!
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