New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Tasting Menu Help

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hey everybody, we are doing tasting menu in school, me and my partner are doing the rice course; we are thinking of doing a deconstructed sushi and could use any ideas anyone would like to throw at us. We are also looking to throw a little influences of molecular gastronomy in it. Thanks in advance, Bobby.
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
post #2 of 20
Sushi is basically two parts, how much do you want to deconstruct?
post #3 of 20
congee with fish eggs?
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
right now it starts off with a sesame soy wrap laid flat, then naki sauce in the shape of chopsticks then on top of that mango jelly, pickled ginger rice, sesame seared tuna, wasabi foam
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
post #5 of 20
Philsophically I disagree. First that it's not really deconstructed sushi because it was never sushi to begin with. Next it's supposed to be a rice course. Yes, there's rice in it, but from the description it does not seem to me to be a rice course.
post #6 of 20
Don't flog the deconstruction horse!!! We finally killed deconstructed dishes two years ago... it has not been long enough to come back retro:D

Also if you deconstruct Sushi what you have is:

Rice

Sashimi

Not really impressive.

Do a saffron rice vegetable pilaf in a timbales or something like that?

Maybe a mini vegetable paella side?

But please leave the deconstructed crap in the grave we have worked so hard to put it in.....

Molecular gastromony done wrong... is a disaster! Stay away from it if you are not doing it all the time.
I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
Reply
I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
Reply
post #7 of 20
Thread Starter 
I understand what you mean, however how am I supposed to do molecular gastromony all the time if I don't start somewhere. Everybody started somewhere.
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
post #8 of 20
Start at home, family is a great testing laboratory.:D
I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
Reply
I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
Reply
post #9 of 20
Arancini!!!!
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #10 of 20
Yeah! Spherification right? There's your molecular gastronomy right there!:roll:
post #11 of 20
Why not try making pasta from the rice? This would allow for creativity that didn't feel forced or contrived. I think a cold noodle salad with maybe a spicy cocktail would be a decent rice course in a tasting menu.
post #12 of 20
AGREED

I think molecular gastromony will go the way of the Hula Hoop, Potato Head and Slinky. At least I hope so Reminds me of a number of years ago a stemmed carrot on the plate a one ounce portion of blue and white potato and a duck leg. It was called Noveau Cuisine. I called it Starvation Cuisine. Now lets really cook!!!!!:rolleyes::rolleyes:
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #13 of 20
I hear you on that!:D
I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
Reply
I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
Reply
post #14 of 20
deconstructed as in they roll the sushi themselves? My thought is forget the person eating rolling sushi. I love sushi but found I am not the best at rolling as well as most people. How about slicing the seaweed into small strips like a garnish or sprinkle diced seaweed. I had to do this when I purchased a do it yourself sushi pack. I tried rolling a couple of them then decided to just break up the seaweed and eat it all with a fork!
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the help everyone. I agree with alot of stuff posted here and have some issues with some of it.
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
post #16 of 20
I'll say at least this much, If you watched Top Chef don't do what Eugene did this season with his "deconstructed" sushi, it looked stupid, IMO (and the judges thought so too).

Perhaps you've already decided what you want to do given the previous comments but I want to butt in.

I'm certainly no authority for Molecular Gastronomy, but just like the use of any other technique in cooking, think about why you're using it and what it contributes to the dish overall; you wouldn't slap a piece of tempura on top of a dish just because "you felt like doing something fried" and you wouldn't throw a foam on a dish because "it's kewl and I wanted to try it out". If you do want to put foams, spherified juice, freeze-dried stock cubes, sous-vide vegetables, etc. on a dish, then place it in a context which makes sense.

Personally, I like CookingAngry's idea, but rice noodles are definitely more challenging to make than flour noodles... having no gluten.

I'm going to assume that you're not going to totally abandon the sushi idea, so let's start from there. Firstly, imagine in your mind all those flavours in your mouth... ask yourself, does it make sense to you? If not, then you're probably (though there are always exceptions) not on the right track. If you have the time, take all those elements and actually try to eat it just to make sure.

Now, your dish has the following elements:

Sesame Soy Wrap
Sesame Seared Tuna
Mango Gelee
Wasabi Foam
Pickled Ginger Rice
Naki Sauce (please enlighten me on what this is, I'm afraid Google is singularly unhelpful)

Now, if you were to rearrange this dish around presentation-wise, you basically have an "asian"-influenced entree of protein (tuna) with two/three (if you include the gelee) sauces, a starch (the rice), and "essentially useless accompaniment that is hard to eat alone" (the soy wrap). The wrap in sushi is usually meant to hold the whole thing together, though itself has a flavour and texture that contributes to the dish. If you want to keep it, I think you should think about incorporating it in a manner that makes a contribution to the dish structurally. Btw, may I ask why you chose soy wrap as opposed to nori?

The gelee is a tricky one... you have the relative graininess (is it going to be served room temperature?) of the rice, the firm cool rawness of the fish, and the not-quite there elements that form the sauce. Is the texture of soft jelly going to work with this combination? Why not julienne? Why not a coulis? Why not pickled sliced mango? Why not spherified mango made to resemble masago or salmon roe?

I can understand the use of Wasabi as a foam.

Now for the pickled ginger rice... you understand that the picked ginger is usually eaten between pieces as a palate cleaner and not with the sushi. What is the rationale for putting it in the rice as opposed to on the side, or in another sauce, or to flavour the tuna? Why is it in the dish at all? I'm not saying you shouldn't do it, but I was simply curious as to why you decided to mix the two items together in that way.

Now, in light of all this I think I've ignored one of the more important questions: Is it a rice dish? Does it celebrate rice? Hard to say... I can justify in my mind that sushi is a rice dish because it makes up so much of each component in every bite, and that the texture, and seasoning of the rice is so important to good sushi. I can also say that fried rice, rice pudding, risotto, bibimbap, or biryani is a rice dish for similar reasons. On the other hand, I can say that CookingAngry's noodle dish is also a rice dish because the main element is based on rice, and although the rice is no longer in a form that's easily recognisable it still makes up a majority of it and plays an important role. Can you say the same about this dish? This is something you have to decide for yourself. Not saying you necessarily have to make risotto, or fried rice, or bibimbap, nor am I saying that a rice course has to have a big pile of rice in the middle, but I agree with kuan in that fundamentally I think it's more of a tuna course than a rice course.

I think after all my rambling all I can suggest is, think of the dish in your mind, then how it affects the important (touch/texture, taste, smell) and less important (hearing, sight) senses (some will disagree), of the dish and tweak it until it is good. Hope you didn't take it personally, I certainly didn't intend it to be... simply my perspective on the whole matter.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #17 of 20
Firstly... thanks for the kind words Blue.

Secondly, Allen, when is this due? If say, this was a project due at the end of the semester, like April you could make a Not-so-Ginger Ginger Ale and it would be done fermenting in maybe 5 weeks. Boil rice for your wort, pitch a strong champagne yeast so it won't take too long and add pickled ginger to to the fermentation tank to have a ginger flavored rice beer.

Basically what I'm saying is that reading Alinea then saying, "I want to do that, where do I start?" should not lead someone to "deconstructed sushi." This is a dish that made the scrub caterer from Vegas on Top Chef. You know where Chef Grant learned, what kitchen his draws the most from? The French Laundry. Not huge on the science but astoundingly complete in terms of chefs knowing how to cook (in a classic sense) everything perfectly. Achatz may have gone to El Bulli but The French Laundry is where he spent his first four years out of culinary school.

Now to your dish... which direction are you currently leaning? It you are 100% set in the deconstructed sushi I would suggest being more creative than cooking tuna exactly how every mule and his brother does it.

Sorry to be so negative but I am beyond tired of "deconstructed" and "Sesame Tuna". I used this thread to vent and I apologize.
post #18 of 20
As an aside, again I think CookingAngry hits the nail on the head... fermented rice milk! I've always been a soy milk drinker, but I wonder if what sort of flavour rice milk has... should try it out the next time I'm at work.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #19 of 20
Thread Starter 
Ok, Ok everyone; I pretty much agree with everyone. First I want tell everyone that I dislike sushi and I did not want to do sushi. The class is culinary techniques and we are at the end of our second term. We were broke down to 2 people groups for the tasting menu and it breaks down into 9 courses.

soup
vegetable
sandwich
salad
pasta
potato
grain
rice
egg

During the choosing of the menu idea, which my partner did want to make a classic sushi; me and my chef got into an altercation because the deconstructed sushi is his idea. Every **** idea I threw into the hat was shot down. I basically told him that I pay "X" amount of dollars to come to school and this tasting menu is supposed to showcase the students talents, not his dumb *** menu ideas. My I idea for our rice course was a grilled pineapple and coconut rice with wild boar and yes I did want to do some kind of molecular gastronomy thing. Oh yeah, "Naki sauce" was a typo it was supposed to be Nori sauce, which would involve rehydrating the nori with soy sauce and reducing it and straining it. But unfortunately we are doing "HIS" ef'n idea. Thanks everybody for your help I basically was trying to get better idea so we could change his mind but it isn't happening; thanks anyway.
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
post #20 of 20
Thread Starter 
i posted pics of the sushi
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
So many Flavors; So little time. Taste your way through life.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking