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Gonna make chiboust

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Should I lighten it with whipped cream or meringue?
post #2 of 12
Personally, I like the taste of raw whipped cream more than raw meringue. It's also less sticky.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #3 of 12
I had to look up Chiboust, had never heard the term. I take it it's the st honore filling?
I actually use both, italian meringue (cooked, not raw) AND whipped cream. Makes a very fluffy and wonderful cream that way.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #4 of 12
Chiboust is lightened with meringue.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #5 of 12
Chiboust can be lightened with either whipped cream or meringue. I prefer the whipped cream version, although if it's going to sit for long, adding some gelatin to stabilize it helps to keep it from weeping.
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
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Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
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post #6 of 12
I also use a stabilizer(Danish sheet gelatin) I find it keeps the whites from losing their ability to stand up and retain air. I use both whip cream and egg white folded in. I use it to fill cream puffs and eclairs.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #7 of 12
LOL, I was surprised to see this, it is close to my company's name chihost

I'll have to try making this, from the recipe it seems like the texture should be lighter than something like a cremebrulee or panna cotta, correct?

For those of you who know Linux, if it turns out bad I will just do
[code]rm -rf *chiboust*[/code]
post #8 of 12
Basically, it's pastry cream folded together w/whipped cream and/or Italian meringue. I'm sure if I were a Linix person I would've gotten your coding joke. I will laugh anyway; it is the thought that counts:lol:
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
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Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
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post #9 of 12
Chiboust is a pastry cream lightened with Italian meringue.
Opera Cream is pastry cream lightened with whipped cream.
Diplomate cream is pastry cream lightended with whiped cream and stabilized with gelatine.
Bavarian is Anglaise lightened with Whipped cream and stabilized with gelatine.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #10 of 12
I believe a lot of those distinctions are sort of tomato-to-MAH-to ones. I'm sure there are many variations on the theme depending on where folks learned to make these different creams.

I generally find that a little flexibility and relaxed dialog rather than bold-faced lecturing make for a happy kitchen :look:
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
post #11 of 12
Bold or not, if you want to understand what something is, call it by name.
Relaxed is fine, but not when Chef askes for Chiboust and you give them Opera, you could lose your job, fail a test or not get a promotion, not get the points needed for certification, any number of things.
It would be a disservice if I did not give proper information.

I could make shoes, but I'd rather wear them.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #12 of 12
I understand where you're coming from. I believe that naming does not necessarily equal understanding. If I say "dog" to someone who has never seen one, they will still not have an understanding of the word.

Each chef in each kitchen might call the same item by different names, depending on where/how/from whom they learned. I agree that everyone in the same kitchen should speak the same language. We're all, figuratively and literally, in different kitchens "out here."

Sorry if I wasn't more clear w/my response.
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
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