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Using a stovetop smoker

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I just got a new toy: a stovetop smoker. :D Now, how do I use it? :look:

A recipe booklet came with it, but it doesn't have instructions for the first thing I want to do: a small rack of lamb. It's 14 ounces/412 grams. I've got it marinating with rosemary and pomegranate molasses, but don't know how long to smoke it. Help, please?

TIA
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #2 of 11
Are you trying to flavor it or cook it through? That is, do you hope after smoking to just slice it and eat it as-is, or are you going to roast it or something later on?
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Probably cook through. We like our lamb on the rare side of medium rare. This is maybe 1 inch thick at its thickest.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #4 of 11
Suzanne:

Checkout this site just as an fyi:

The Virtual Weber Bullet - For the Weber Smokey Mountain Cooker smoker enthusiast

I own and use this smoker at least 2x monthly for jerkey and Boston butts. Works great and I'm not an owner of the tvwb website. But the information that it offers is great to those who want to smoke!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 11
Suzanne,

If you cook it all the way in the smoker you may find the smoke to assertive. I would smoke it about 3 minutes, That will give it a nice smoky coat. You may also want to put some of the rosemary in the smoker to accent the marinade. I would then roast it in a hot oven for about 7 to 8 minutes
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #6 of 11
Very difficult to smoke and have come out rare, in fact a little dangerous. As stated above I would smoke first , but more then 5 minutes then proceed to roast, Also is any wood being used ? Also be prepared to have aroma linger in kitchen for quite a while.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all suggestions. This is hot smoking, so it will cook as well as smoke. And since it is closed, very little if any smoke escapes -- a definite plus for an apartment dweller. :smoking:

What prompted me to finally get it (it's a Camerons) was being at someone's house who used it for pork tenderloins following the recipe in the booklet that comes with the smoker. That recipe says 25 minutes, which was enough time for me but our hosts thought the meat was too rare and left it for another 15 minutes or so. In any event, it was delicious, still very moist and just nicely smoky. So I am actually looking for timings. I'll see what happens and post about the results.

I plan to save my rosemary twigs for another time, though.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
So here’s what happened:

I set up the smoker according to the directions that came with it, using cherry wood chips (actually very finely ground wood, cubes maybe 1/10 inch). Smoked the lamb for 30 minutes, let it rest still closed for 10 minutes. It cooked to medium – more than we like – but remained very moist. Good smoke flavor, not at all too strong. And very little of the smoke smell escaped into the apartment. What did is rather pleasant, and not enough to set off the smoke alarm.

This is all very exciting to me. Something to take the boredom out of cooking (almost) every night! And with quite satisfactory results. What a nice present to myself this turned out to be. :D
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #9 of 11
Suzanne-

I've been thinking about one of these (for winter) for several years. You're encouraging me. Did you get a Camerons, or a fancier one?

If you haven't already, get sone alder chips for your salmon. You'll think you're camping out next to a stream in the Olympic Peninsula!

Stovetop Smoker - More Categories - Compare Prices, Reviews and Buy at NexTag - Price - Review

Has Alder especially prepared for the stove smoker.

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #10 of 11
How was the amount of smoke in your kitchen? I could never use a stove top smoker my exhaust is not strong enough.
Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #11 of 11
Since you're a pro, you should definitely try smoked eel. Peel it, then cut in chunks. After it's been smoked and thus cooked through, which doesn't take long, split it and the bones come out very easily. Pepin has a recipe in The Art of Cooking, a book that's nearly impossible to find, but worth it IMO. He rolls it up with eggplant and roasted red peppers.
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