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how to peel hard boiled eggs

post #1 of 41
Thread Starter 
I love hard boiled eggs and I noticed lately, that when I peel them the shell sticks and I remove most of the egg white. Does anyone know what I am doing wrong. I cook my eggs for 7 minutes exactly.

Thanks

Redon:suprise:

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post #2 of 41

A couple of things to try:

Use older eggs, those tend to peel easier.  Add a bit of baking soda to the water, that does something to cause the white to bond to itself rather than the shell (but can enhance the sulfur smell).  Chill the eggs after boiling.  Heaps of salt in the water seems to work in place of baking soda.

 

Myself, I just bring the eggs to a boil, immediately cut the heat, cover and leave to sit for 10 minutes afterwards, rinse, chill and peel.

 

Justin

post #3 of 41

Another thing that might help is peeling the eggs under running water.  The shell membrane often lifts easier from the egg whites that way.  Just be sure you have a filter over the drain or a garbage disposal.  Egg shells are notorious for clogging pipes.

 

+D.

post #4 of 41

Once the eggs are cooked empty the hot water from the pan then put the pan under cold running water. Shake the pan around to crack the shells and let the eggs cool down. Peel fairly easy after doing this. I also use salt in the water. Old eggs are better but the ones you get from the store have usually been in storage a week or more already.

post #5 of 41

Hope this helps. I use this method as like using very fresh eggs,  once they are boiled and completely cooled as mentioned previously,   with the palm  of your hand roll them over the work surface pressing on them gently, until the shell cracks evenly all over, they will be ready to peel much more easily now.  

post #6 of 41

Yes, as Seaside says roll the egg over the work surface until the shell is cracked evenly all over. The shell will probably stay attached to the membrane making peeling much easier.

post #7 of 41

Hold under cold running water, crack shell all over, it will all peel off so easily.

post #8 of 41

To All. There is no such thing as a hard boiled egg. The word is misused. Don't believe me ? check with American Egg Board.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #9 of 41

I use iced water personally especially if doing a heap of them, commercially I steam my eggs less drama than mucking around with boiling water and can leave the eggs in the carton or tray depending on how they come to me. So I suppose I do hard steamed eggs not hard boiled.While we are on eggs can anybody tell me what the difference in feed to the chooks between Amercia and Australia as your American eggs are so yellow when raw and our Aussie eggs are more of a orangey colour, who is feeding thier chooks dodgey food OZ or USA or both?

post #10 of 41

when i boil eggs, after 3-4mins, i crack the eggs a bit, just a small crack, to make cooking faster. when the egg white sticks out then it's cooked. then remove it from the hot water then let it stay in cold water a few seconds, when it's already cool then you can already crack open the egg and viola! perfect hard-boiled egg!

 

--

i started my bakery with HTSB

post #11 of 41

Our feed in most cases probably contains more additives and hormones then yours, which I do not think is good.

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #12 of 41

Yolk color usually has more to do with the type of chicken than the feed. 

 

However, the egg industry (in the US, at least) has shifted towards feed containg less calcium.  If you (as a US resident) has noticed that egg shells are thinner and more difficult to peel -- that's why.

 

BDL

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http://www.cookfoodgood.com
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What were we talking about?
 
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post #13 of 41

 

does any one know how to make a salad dressing out of a boiled egg pls.? I know my Uncle use to make a Penguin with black olives and carrots as the legs the only thing is that i can't remember how he use to make it but it looked great !!!!!!!!! 

post #14 of 41

Nice info, thanks

post #15 of 41

I've used this technique for at least 18 years and it works 98% of the time depending on the age of the eggs.  I usually use the same technique that someone mentioned about bringing the egg completely covered in salted water to a boil, take it off heat then keep covered for the desired minutes according to your preference.  Then I simply drain all of the water off then vigorously shake the pot.

 

The next step is to swirl the eggs around in the pot which breaks up most of the surface of the egg's shell.  I immediately shock the shell with ice cold water and let it sit for a few minutes which will usually separate the membrane from the surface of the egg and stops the egg from cooking any further. I then peel them while holding them underneath the cold water which makes everything slide off easier.

 

This is not recommended for soft boiled eggs of course.

 

This usually works very well for me.

post #16 of 41

Nica:  that's the same method that I've seen Jacque Pepin use when he's cooking three or more eggs.  Agreed: it works beautifully.

post #17 of 41

On the subject of boiling eggs:  I've also seen one chef poke a hole in one end of the egg (forget which end) to let the air escape so that the occasional leakage doesn't happen as it heats.  No fun peeling a partially exploded egg.

post #18 of 41

I use cold water and salt. Also let it cool for a few moments to avoid cracking.

post #19 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryB View Post

Once the eggs are cooked empty the hot water from the pan then put the pan under cold running water. Shake the pan around to crack the shells and let the eggs cool down. Peel fairly easy after doing this. I also use salt in the water. Old eggs are better but the ones you get from the store have usually been in storage a week or more already.


Yeah same here. I do exactly how MaryB peeled the eggs but minus the salt. Well, i might try it next time for a smooth and perfect peeling. :)

post #20 of 41

I have an egg question...

 

I have always thought that brown eggs were better tasing than white eggs.

 

anyone disagree? and why?

 

Don.

post #21 of 41

My friend raises chickens. I get mine so fresh I need to wash them before using.  Yeah they are a bear to peel.  I will have to try the suggestions here.  By the way he says the only thing different between brown eggs, and white eggs is the color.

 

Oh yeah "Hi" this is my first post.

post #22 of 41

salted ice water shocks the membrane. you salt the water so that the water reaches below zero temperatures. crack the shell to enhance the cooling of the egg itself. baking soda softens the water. not the egg.

post #23 of 41

I posed this very question to a large egg producer.

The answer was quite convoluted, but any way.

It apparently depends upon the type of bird that laid the egg and the freshness.

A fresh egg tends to "push" on the shell when boiled making it tougher to peel, and an older egg having lost some moisture does not thus easier. A pin hole in the bottom (wider part) will eliminate cracking when cooked, but will not make it easier to peel.

I buy eggs from a lady that raises Bantams and when boiled the shell just peels off even if the egg was laid the same day and the yolks are bright orange; they are fed natural grains and not corporate hen food.

Thus there is no slick fail safe method to shell an egg and the simplest of all foods still provokes questions.

post #24 of 41

There was a dressing popular in the UK dating from WW2, my mother used to call it "Mimosa dressing" it was made using dried eggs a little oil, vinegar, a pinch of mustard and salt and pepper. The recipe was later refined or reverted to its original form using hard boiled eggs instead of the dried variety. The resultant dressing was a little like pasty mayo, but quite tasty nonetheless.

post #25 of 41

Using cooked/pasteurised yolks in mayo can give a little more confidence if you want to take potato salad to a bbq in the heat...

 

This guy seems to have used his PhD to sort it out...

"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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post #26 of 41

...so we were costing the labor on boiled eggs today and I managed to peel 100 eggs in 17 minutes (5.88 eggs a minute). Anyone else have egg peeling times or a good target to be at?

post #27 of 41

From things I have read in some books and articles  the original 1000 Island dressing contained chopped hard cooked eggs.Thats why it was called 1000 isle because when on a plate it reminded one of islands floating n the ocean, For that matter the original Russian dressing was red caviar and sour cream. some mayo ..  Over the years both became Americanized

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #28 of 41


     Quote:

Originally Posted by Justin Thomas View Post

...so we were costing the labor on boiled eggs today and I managed to peel 100 eggs in 17 minutes (5.88 eggs a minute). Anyone else have egg peeling times or a good target to be at?


Takes me that long to do a dozen.

 

Wasn't there some sort of gadget, where you placed the egg in a small cup shapped thingy, pumped another thingy, which supposedly blew air between the shell and egg = "TaDA"  the shell all, but fell off????  No I'm not thinking of the "In-the-shell-scrambler" this was for hard boiled eggs.
 

post #29 of 41

Not getting into the food chemistry but boiling eggs a shorter, high heat cook causes the negative reaction of the sulfur and iron in the eggs. This produces the dark ring outside the yolk and the strong sulfur smell. I found a much harder time peeling the eggs when this happens.   

 

Place eggs in pot, add water one inch above eggs and bring to a rapid boil. Once boiling, remove from heat and cover for 17 minutes. Drain hot water and add very cold tap water. For me, this method has never produced that dark ring and strong egg smell and is easier to peel.  

 

When eggs are cool enough to handle, cracks eggs thoroughly all the way around and place back in the cold water. Let eggs set in the cold water for at least 10 to 30 minutes. Water will get under the membrane between the white and the cracked shell and peel much easier.

 

I tried piercing the eggs before the cook and ice in the water to super chill the eggs after the cook and both steps were unnecessary IMO.  

 

I absolutely hate kitchen gadgets as cluttered drawers and cabinets aggravate the hell out of me. I like the KISS method, however, I used one of these at a friend’s house for making a ton of deviled eggs and it was super fast. Poor quality gadget and I would never buy one but it was fast.

 

http://www.eggstractor.net/

post #30 of 41

I know what you mean about junk gadgits.  I hate them, and the drawers I have full of them!  Thanks for the link, ya gotta know it will end up in one of my drawers.

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