or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › young and love to travel
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

young and love to travel

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
I am only 23 years old and love to travel, I have 5 years cooking experience, culinary school and some fine dining experience and this may sound like I am asking a lot here, but I am looking for a job that allows me to work my tail off for a couple weeks (or however long) at a time and then allows me some time off to travel around a bit, while still making good food. I am living in New Orleans at the moment, but am willing to move if need be. Thanks in advance for any input.
post #2 of 8
My suggestion? Get a "holiday", or in the UK a Youth Mobility Visa (Unfortunately as an American you won't quite be able to go this route if you read the fine print) Points Based System Tier 5 (Youth Mobility Scheme) (INF 28) . Save up some money, go and volunteer or hire out your services and live & learn as much as you can!
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #3 of 8
I have worked seasonal jobs for many years, when I needed to make more money went from one to another. when funds were in good shape, traveled for fun.

done everything from remote lodges and hotels, logging camps, and all types of boats and ships.

this may sound a little sketchy to some, but if you do a good job and keep employers informed as to what you are doing (easy now with internet), it can work.

my resume does not have that many employers--the name and contact info listed and then all the dates I have worked for them. some I have returned to for almost 20 years.
and reason for leaving each time is --contract finished or season over.

If you would consider working at sea--many contracts are from 60-120 days and the depending on situation, matching time off.

There are many lodges and hotels only open part of the year, both summer or ski areas.

I was offered an excellent position some time ago at an upscale resturant, then realized I would be working 11.5 months a year for possibly a little more income.

you have to remember that at these jobs at sea or on shore, you are it, because of space for crew and other things are limited, the hours can be grueling! A former shipsmate of mine comes from the huge cruise ship industry and although they are BIG, in the food service areas, it is tough.

Wth your culinary education, you might want to check in the the big lines though,
Good Luck,
Nan
post #4 of 8
When I was done with school and I had a few years under my belt I started to do short term work on Dude Ranches in the summer, Private Charter Yatchs in the spring and fall and ski resorts in the winter. I was able to put everything I needed in an Escort wagon and negotiated my pay with some kind of housing. For 2 years I never spent more than 3 months in one location and learned sooooo much about ppl, food, management styles and life. If you are single, are not afraid to shower in a camp ground and sleep in your car than I would say go for it. Always plan ahead, know where you are going, get the position before you get to the location.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #5 of 8
cruiseline chef, or private chef.
post #6 of 8

Small cruiseships

I have been working for a small ship cruiseline for the past 8 years and I love it. The most passengers we have is 130 on our largest ship. We work 12 hours a day for 6-8 weeks then get 2-4 weeks off in the summer. I have spent my winters in South east Asia, Ecuador, and West Africa. Plus you can backpack around Europe in the summertime on your breaks.

I spent 5 years without paying rent so you can limit your bills. You can check it out at Cruisewest.com
post #7 of 8
That actually sounds really attractive to me!
post #8 of 8
I worked for almost 7 years as a private yacht chef. Sometimes on charter yachts (VERY busy) and sometimes on private yachts (not so busy). I loved it, made VERY good money and had a blast as yacht crew do like to party. In the beginning I worked on sail boats and traveled up and down the Med (from Spain to Scicily, Turkey and N. Africa) I also sailed across the Atlantic, then worked the Carribean from east to west (though some of that work was delivary). After a while I switched to large motor yachts 160+ the money was better and food more demanding then I pretty much stayed in the Med. part of Europe. I had several opportunities to take jobs in the South Pacific, E. Coast of US and Austrail-Asia, as well as round-the-world cruises but turned them down (doh!) because I was in a relationship.

The pay was always good. So good that I was able to travel in my off time when I wasn't employed, pay off loans and save a little. (but I spent a lot too ah well...)

It is not the same as cooking in restaruants! You are cooking mulit-course meals that are all served at the same time. You must buy provisions sometimes for 6-months at at time. I would say I had about 50% control over what to cook.

Some of the pros:
Pay I started about US$2000 and left the industry making about $60,000year. In addition on charter yachts I was tipped often another couple of thou per week. Room, board, uniform, and on some boats water toys for the crew to use.

Cheffing Most of the time I never had to cook for more than 16 people, though I did the occasional party for 100+. Sometimes I also had to cook for crew 16-18 ppl. Unlimited budget for guests, thats right though I had to keep track of money spent I never had a budget, lamb loin, saffron, homard breton, cavier, whatever I wanted. Not to mention traveling in areas where I "had" to shop for ingredients in places like French and Spanish markets, and negotiate with fisherman.

Cons
Lifestyle - This isn't the lifestyle for everyone. During a charter season it can be 20 hours a day non-stop. You need to always be neat and clean with a polished look. You are hired help to millionaires. Sometimes they will respect you and treat you like a freind othertimes you will be the servant. You are living in cramped quarters.

Competition - Until you have been hired on a few boats the competition is fierce. The best bet is to start off on smaller sail boats.

Cooking -Rich people don't eat rich foods all the time, usually they eat like thier at home. (I've cooked a lot of hotdogs and pizza) Most wealthy people like very light healthy food, and in 7 years I only met one person who was passionate about food, so forget about those braised cow brains. You are cooking 3-5 meals a day at the whim of the guests who can change their mind about anything at any minute from time to # guests). You have to be able to keep the galley SPOTLESS, like new everynight, by yourself.

Well I tend to ramble on a bit if you want to ask me anymore questions PM me.
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
Reply
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Professional Food Service › Professional Chefs › young and love to travel