or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Mercury in Corn Syrup
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Mercury in Corn Syrup

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
One more reason to not eat "industrialized" food:

Mercury in corn syrup? -- South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com
Lance
Reply
Lance
Reply
post #2 of 17
Let us also not forget the amounts in sushi and FRESH FISH and they are natural.
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #3 of 17
True. But in Japan, they argue that it's largely a matter of weight, age, and fat content. You really should take it easy on the tuna, for example, which is wildly overfished anyway. But tai (sea bream) and other ultra-popular fish for sashimi are often quite small and low in fat; tai for example is rarely much over 2 feet long, and is a very light white-fleshed fish. Fish like this have neither the time nor the flesh structures for serious mercury exposure and absorption, and as a result you can eat them without much concern. Small blue fish like anchovies, smelts, and sardines are very fatty, but so small that the absorption is minimal. Salmon is almost never eaten as sashimi in Japan, because of parasites, but it is commonly thought that because it spends a good part of its life in running fresh water it probably has relatively little exposure, whereas tuna is a deep-sea fish and hits mercury all the time.

So there's one good reason to pass up the toro, now that we can't afford it. It's full of mercury. So you're not poor or cheap, you're saving your life!

As to fish compared with other things, it must be said that Mad Cow is pretty deadly, and nobody knows how much there is in the American herd, because it's illegal to test for it appropriately. Chicken is full of salmonella. Pork is probably safe, I suppose.

Personally, in America I don't buy even medium-sized fish, because it's always so awful unless you pay a fortune. I buy small "trash fish" from Chinese markets, and these guys are so small that the mercury is surely trivial.

(All of which should be ignored if you're pregnant or nursing, by the way, because this makes mercury deposit in the body in extremely dangerous ways from the baby's perspective. Do what your doctor tells you.)
post #4 of 17
Pork is mostly safe because it is irradiated in a lot of processing plants.
Salmonella can be killed with heat. I dont believe trace mercury can be eliminated in fish . Corn syrup is subject to extremely high heat and still contains mercury as does fructose .
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #5 of 17
Mercury is an element, the heat available to us can't really "break it down" to subatomic particles.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
Reply
post #6 of 17
Ed -

I'm aware of your opinion that the entire government is a batch of numbskulls, but I presume you are aware that irradiated products - and all products sold at retail, repackaged from, or made from, or combined with, or yadda yadda, are REQUIRED BY LAW to be labeled / identified as such.

see: Irradiation Questions and Answers

so perhaps the numbskulls cannot define 'radiation' - but my bet is commercial enterprises are not wholesale ignoring regulations that can get them shut down - and certainly things vary by region / area / persuasion - but around here I have never seen an irradiated pork label, on anything.
post #7 of 17
Dillbert says, "but my bet is commercial enterprises are not wholesale ignoring regulations that can get them shut down"

Um--Peanut Corporation of America, anyone? I know it's off topic; just couldn't resist:) There are plenty of big companies playing fast and loose with the rules and endangering our health in the name of profit. Scary stuff.
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
post #8 of 17
Peanut Corp. of America was last tested in their own words by the FDA in 2001 they then entered into contract with the Georgia health dept to inspect the facility. That was done in 2006.. The supposed contamination of the peanut butter according to them was a leaking roof. Years ago it was determined that the facility should not process food. The Salmonella was detected by independent 2 labs in Sept pf 2008.. So far ONLY 5 people have died? Why did it take the FDA_USDA so long to notify the Public? Car recalls are done quicker then this.Why was the facility allowed to remain open? Why because closing it would cause local loss of jobs. Our Legislators are now saying that the FD A and USDA need more regulation. I have been saying this for years . My opinion they are worthless. PCA although the product tested possitive still sold it to many manufacturers. Pocket Testing This means a product is tested by a lab.found positive then retested found negative (but the same product) We are always told ("when in doubt, throw it out ")) some manufacturers dont adhere to this policy. 1/8 of the batch may test positive , the other 7/8 negative, therefor in their eyes its alright. Once again cant help it, but the way the FDA and USDA operates today is a sham.:eek::cry:
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #9 of 17
Amen, and amen, Chef Ed. Shudder.
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
Jenni
Pastry Chef Online
Pastry Methods and Techniques
We're all home cooks when we're cooking at home.
Reply
post #10 of 17
>>fast and loose

true, but irradiation of pork is perfectly legal and an approved method for control of trichinella - there's no legal reason to play fast and loose or to hide the fact.

it is an expense, and the incidence of trichinella is sufficiently low that except for special purpose products it seems quite uncommon in the US.

depending on which marketing survey you read / accept, the issue is more one of consumer acceptance. curiously, restaurants are not required to 'inform' customers whether the beef / pork / other approved food stuffs are irradiated - and some chains do source irradiated beef, especially ground beef, as a precautionary measure. when the meat comes in the back door, it must be properly labeled and identified - but there is no obligation to pass that 'information' to the diner.
post #11 of 17
Actually, as someone who deals with these things on a daily basis, irradiated products dont need to be labeled as such unless the ENTIRE FINISHED PRODUCT or at least 90% on the RAW MATERIALS involved in the finished product are irradiated. If you have a jar of spices in your cabinet and you live outside the US, the UK in particular, than your items have either been irradiated or steam treated. If you live in the US/Canada than that have been ETO treated more than likely.

For those of you who are interested here is a link to find out more info and the Federal Regs regarding irradiated products. Food Irradiation Labeling Background and History
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #12 of 17
/q
The USDA consumer labeling requirements for for meat and poultry are the same as the FDA requirements, with the following differnces:
  • Multi-ingredient products that include an irradiated meat product must reflect its inclusion in the ingredient statement on the finished product's label. This is the major difference from the FDA's requirements for processed nonmeat products, which do not have to be labeled to the consumer at all./uq
is that not contradictory?
post #13 of 17
Not really, they both state that all raw MEAT prouducts have to be labeled as irradiated, but NONMEAT products dont unless they are single sourced meaning raw fruit, veggies and herbs.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #14 of 17
Most things the FDA OR USDA do are contradictory.. Also how can you possibly have a source for meat, when it is perfectly legal to have meat from various countries mixed together.
Next time anyone goes to supermarket read the chopmeat label., it used to be that meat and chicken had to be labeled" Previously Frozen '' Now however since the product is Frosted (32 degrees) it does not have to be labeled as such.
I would much prefer to eat irradiated products then some of the other meat that is sold. I deem it 10 times safer.
There are major flaws in our food chain and it all comes down to economics and profit . The USDA and FDA are run by scientist and politicians , not by food people who really are involved in the day by day processing of food.
Quoting Jimmy Cramer who often goes off on the people who were running the SEC (and look at the economic fiasco that got us into) ""THEY KNOW NOTHIN""" Once the government gets involved in non government issues forgetaboutit. EDB:bounce:
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #15 of 17
>>Not really, they both state that all raw MEAT prouducts have to be labeled as irradiated, but NONMEAT products dont unless they are single sourced meaning raw fruit, veggies and herbs.

I thought we were talking about pork.

if the butcher whips up a batch of ground meat for meatloaf - 40% beef, 30% pork and 30% veal - and _only_ the pork has been irradiated, must it say the pork has been irradiated (or approved text blah blah) on the label?
post #16 of 17
dONT KNOW IF RADIATION RUBS OFF:D

You want to trust what they tell you ? Thats your perogative. I worked in Fed inspected places on a commercial basis. I saw first hand what went on, How backs were turned and a public be damned attitude. Everyone has to do what is good for them based on their experiences.ED
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #17 of 17
>>dONT KNOW IF RADIATION RUBS OFF

I do.
It don't, and to be precise, the specific kinds of irradiation approved for use don't.

if you read up on the CDC literature/reports about pork borne illnesses, the dramatic drop in the incidence of trichinosis is frequently cited as due to 'recent' regulations regarding what pigs raised for human consumption may and may not be fed. they may (now) not be fed the offal from the (pork) slaughter house. and if that scenario sounds familiar, it should - in the beef world it is the BSE 'issue.'

chefhow deals with the issue from a food production standpoint. I'd say he's our best expertise.

I am seeking clarification on the text:

"Multi-ingredient products that include an irradiated meat product must reflect its inclusion in the ingredient statement on the finished product's label. This is the major difference from the FDA's requirements for processed nonmeat products, which do not have to be labeled to the consumer at all."

the meat loaf mixture is not a nonmeat product - and it is a multi-ingredient product - so I read the fact that the pork is irradiated must be declared.
but as you point out, that which the gummymint says is not always what the gummymint means.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Mercury in Corn Syrup