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How do I make a good teriakyi sauce?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
How do I make a good teriakyi sauce?
post #2 of 16
Fresh ginger, ground whole in food processor or
grinding attachment 8oz. wt.
Fresh Garlic, ground whole in food processor or
grinding attachment 8oz. wt.
Green Onions ground whole in food processor or
grinding attachment 1 cup
Sesame oil and veg oil blend 50/50 1/2 cup
Brown Sugar, Dark 2lbs.
Sherry, Dry 1cup
Soy Sauce (I prefer Kikoman) 1qt.

Grind ginger, garlic and green onion in Robot Coupe or use FGA for a KA or drive. In a large pot, heat oils until hot over med-high heat. Sauté for 2-3 minutes or until mixture begins to turn translucent. Add remaining ingredients and bring mixture to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and cool. Store, unstrained, in refrigerator over night.

Using a china cap or fine mesh strainer (chinois) strain solid ingredients. Return to refrigerator until needed.


Fresh, strained marinade may also be reduced to produce a glaze for meats and vegetables.

Keeps up to 6 months in Refrigerator unused. Can be used up to 3 times for beef and/or veg. Use only once for chicken. May also be thinned 2/1 marinade/pineapple juice for chicken.
post #3 of 16
Well, the first thing I'd do is correct the spelling. It is teriyaki, a combination of the words 'teri' the meaning of which I've forgotten, and 'yaki' which means grill or broil, as I recall. So it is something that puts a nice teri on your yaki.

Anyway, basic teriyaki sauce is simple. Something like 2 parts soy sauce, 1 part vinegar, 1 part sugar of some sort, and seasoned with garlic, ginger, perhaps black pepper. The vinegar can be apple cider, or rice wine or plain old white vinegar. I use rice wine vinegar in mine. The sugar can be granulated white or your favorite shade of brown. I used molasses once, wasn't that happy with the outcome.

My recipe, which is rarely made the exact same way twice, is something like:

1/2 cup soy sauce
1/4 rice wine vinegar
1/4 cup brown sugar
2 T sherry
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 t finely minced fresh ginger

Put all in a small saucepan over medium low heat, stirring frequently to get the sugar dissolved. Once simmering, reduce for 5 minutes or so.

If you want to use it as a marinade, no need to reduce and thicken.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #4 of 16
What are you making? It matters -- teriyaki as such isn't a sauce but a style of dish, so if you're making teriyaki chicken or something, you want a quite different approach from those already listed.

If you want teriyaki sauce by itself, I'd use teamfat's recipe and if possible replace the sherry with drinkable sake. Note that everything nonliquid in that recipe, except for the sugar, is entirely optional: the usual Japanese versions don't have any of those things, which is why many people find them rather bland.
post #5 of 16
Kikoman sells it already made,buy it, it's good. Dont make life more complicated.:rolleyes:
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post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Yes, but what fun would that be :chef:
post #7 of 16
My very simple recipe is

1 part low sodium Yamasa Soy
1 part dark brown sugar
1 garlic clove pureed
1/2 orange juiced
1/2 lemon juiced
2 green onions minced
1/2 bunch cilntro minced

Combine all ingredients and let it sit in the fridge for 30 minutes before using.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #8 of 16
Do you ever consider looking at cook books?:bounce:
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post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
People here seem to have better recipes/ideas.
post #10 of 16
To make a good teriyaki sauce do the following:
  1. Pour all ingredients in a pan.
  2. Stir the mixture well.
  3. Put the pan on low heat and simmer for a couple of minutes.
  4. Remove from the heat and cool the mixture.
  5. Store the sauce in a clean bottle in the fridge.
Tips:
  1. You can substitute mirin with sake and sugar (sake:sugar = 3:1)
  2. Adjust the amount of sugar, depending on your preference.
What You Need:
  • 1/2 cup soy sauce
  • 1/2 cup *mirin (sweet rice wine) (soy sauce : mirin = 1:1)
  • 2 tbsp sugar
post #11 of 16
Gotta have some garlic too.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #12 of 16
i ahve seen recipes where it is just soy sauce and rice wine or sake or sometihng like htat

i tihnk it was in a book called my stomach goes traveling... always wondered about that recipe
post #13 of 16
Yes, that's basically right. It's a standard trio used in probably 90% of basic Japanese dishes: soy sauce, sake, and mirin (sweet cooking sake). If you can't get real mirin, you use sake and sugar, which comes out much the same. If you can't get drinkable sake, just quit while you're ahead. Heat these ingredients together until they're beginning to thicken slightly, which doesn't take long; this step is optional but works better as a rule.

So then you put a piece of fish fillet or chicken or whatever in the oiled pan over medium heat and start basting constantly with this sauce mix, turning the meat when it needs it. As the meat cooks, the sauce keeps thickening and gets flavored by the juices. Serve immediately.

You can get very complicated about it, but teriyaki is basically a way of cooking: you grill (messy) or saute protein while basting with this standard liquid seasoning mix. If you do it right, when the meat is done, it's coated with this salty, sweet, and sticky sauce.
post #14 of 16
interesting!
post #15 of 16
Perhaps, but if you're fond of what Americans usually call teriyaki sauce you'll find it simultaneously bland and salty. I find that this sort of classic teriyaki is best on fish, particularly a fish like salmon, i.e. fish that grills very well. Use skin-on fillets. Do it in a pan, and the sauce gives a flavor that complements the fish in the same sort of way charcoal smoke would. Then serve the fish warm, not hot from the pan; it's also perfectly good at room temperature. It's really a good nibbly thing that people pick at with chopsticks, accompanying rice and pickles and miso soup, rather than a main dish by itself.

As far as I can tell, this is the likely origin of the dish -- and indeed a large number of traditional Japanese dishes. In the old days, among middle-class folks and up, people were served on individual trays at home. You got a dish of pickles and a dish of something like teriyaki salmon, both of which were made, plated, and arranged on trays well in advance -- and thus were room temperature or close to it. At dinner time, mom or the servant ladled up miso soup (made in advance, but often with the miso whisked in at the last minute) and put a lidded bowl of this on each tray. Then a bowl of rice to finish, and the trays were served. Mom or the servant knelt next to the rice pot during dinner so people could have more if they wanted; chances are mom (if she did the serving) also ate after everyone else was done.

The point being, teriyaki is a way of cooking fish (usually) that makes it excellent more or less regardless of temperature.
post #16 of 16
Some 30 years ago or dang close to it, while on a trip to Honolulu, I ate at a Japanese steak house with my family (sorry I can't even come close to remembering the name but it wasn't Benihana:rolleyes:). It was as authentiic as I can remember it but then again I really had nothing to base it against especially since I lived in Chicago.

Anyhow I ordered the Steak and I remember it was served on a plate with bowls of rice, snow peas, bean sprouts (an unbelievable amount of them too) and a small bowl of sauce for dipping the foods into and grilled pineapple (being that it was Hawaii). It wasn't a very elaborate sauce but I do specifically remember the sweet, ginger and garlic tastes. Interesting things is it wasn't to far off in taste to the sauce I posted back in Feb. Although I have to say the post I made back then shows more of a marinade for meats in the American style. It can be a bit more harsh given it's application. After looking at things I would also substitute sake for the sherry, I just wish Icould get a good sake here. :look:

I would like to say thanks to Chris for the more than educational posts. I always new it was a style of cooking but not about some of the nuances that were explained. Hawaii is as close to the Far East I have ever been. I doubt that I will ever make it to the that area of the world but ya never know.:D
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