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What can I do with skin on pork belly?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
I picked up a 3lb pork belly, with the skin on. What is the best way to prepare this?
post #2 of 26
You may like to try this recipe....It's from Gordon Ramsay, it looked delicious on his show when I saw it...

http://www.mudgeefinefoods.com.au/re...ton%20Pork.pdf

It's a bit of fussing around, I'd like to try it myself. If you do, let us know how it goes :)

Daina
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks! I am making that tonight.
post #4 of 26
That sounds like a great preparation. For a nice way (not healthy, but really tasty!) to use the skin by itself, here's a link for making "cracklings" or "cracklin'" depending on where you're from!

Recipe: Pork Cracklings (Chicharon)
Jenni
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Jenni
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post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
They call those "skins" around here, I'm not a fan of them.
post #6 of 26
I wasn't either until just a couple of weeks ago. I had some at a little barbecue place in downtown Raleigh called Cooper's--they kept them in a big 24 quart Cambro on the counter--light and crispy, not greasy, not too "piggy". They were perfect. My guess is they blanch them before frying. I've been converted:chef:
Jenni
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Jenni
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post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
lol, I'm sure those were good :talk:
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
I tasted a little, tastes pretty good, even so far. I have it in the fridge now, weighted down with 2x20lb dumbells (I knew those would come in handy for something) and tomorrow I will finish cooking it. Out of the oven it was a good 3 inches high, after sitting about an hour, its down to a good 2 inches, so I will see what it looks like in the morning.
post #9 of 26
For what you're doing, you might want to sear them on the stove top. The beauty of this dish is getting a cube of crispy goodness outside and meltingly-tender inside. I've found that direct contact w/an extremely hot pan is better at this than a hot oven.

However you choose to finish it, I would humbly suggest a maple or apple gastrique. That would be lovely :smiles:
Jenni
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Jenni
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post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks! Good ideas!
post #11 of 26
Thanks DC I saw Gordon make this on the F word a while ago and have been meaning to search for the recipe. Can't wait to find a pork belly! Sounds like an easy thing to make for a dinner party too since you get 90% of the cooking done the day before.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #12 of 26
You can braise it (skin off) or you should try making your own bacon. I did it once and was hooked after that.
Thanks,

Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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Thanks,

Nicko 
ChefTalk.com Founder
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
Bacon (I made)
(26 photos)
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post #13 of 26
Daniel Bouloud uses skin to thicken pates.
A year or so ago one of the highend caterers active on Cheftalk mentioned fancy toppings on cracklin's...ie truffle salt, mushroom powder.....don't remember the others,but it was interesting.

NYTimes did an article on a restaurant that is candy coating hunks of cooked off belly. One of STL best is cooking off bacon and triple dipping it in really good chocolate, it is amazingly good...um great.:p
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #14 of 26
I like to do this, rolled and tied with plenty of soy sauce, star anise and brown chicken stock. It can be cooked ahead then sliced and reheated. This is also from a Ramsay recipe and it is wonderful.
post #15 of 26
It's a classic Chinese technique called red cooking and is very good on most meat and fowl. Usually also includes garlic, onion, ginger, tangerine/orange peel, brown sugar, shaohsing wine, light and dark soys, and as above.

Very good stuff. Reserve the cooking liquid, defat, and freeze, or keep using weekly. The liquid gets better with use and occasionally add more of the seasonings. Mine's been going a few years now, just used it last at Chinese New Years.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #16 of 26
Look on the BBC food website, there are loads of recipes for pork belly
post #17 of 26
It is very good stuff indeed Phil,

Does this mean you use the reserved liquid to cook another belly?

I usually reduce mine to a glaze so dont have much left over. it includes a mirepoix deglazed with sherry vinegar, lots of garlic, coriander seeds, peppercorns, dark soy and the stock.
post #18 of 26
I don't. I freeze mine as i only use it every few months. But if you're not going to do that, then a weekly boil keeps it from going bad. I've got about a gallon of the sauce and I use some for dressing or as a plating sauce. Sometimes reduced. But there are lots of other preparations with this master sauce besides the pork. I've mostly done chicken in mine but I've got recipes using duck, goose, beef tonge, pork belly, roasts and so forth.

Other dishes, after cooking in the sauce may get roasted or deep fried for example.

My favorite treatment is to simmer some chicken wings in the sauce. Let cool in the sauce, then smoke for an hour or two, then grill or broil to crisp up the skin.

I used a little of the sauce to braise some tofu, mushrooms, carrots and Chinese sausage a week ago. That was pretty good.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #19 of 26
Thread Starter 
For the bacon, you take the skin off, then smoke it then press it? Or press it then smoke it?

TIA
post #20 of 26
Here's a link to an OLD discussion with a few simplified versions of the dish for duck and chicken: http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/recip...k-i-think.html
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #21 of 26
Wow that is an old thread, thanks Phil Im going to try red cooked duck.
post #22 of 26
There is a very famous old Chinese recipe for pork belly, generally known as Dong Po Rou (literally, Meat (meaning pork) Su Dongpo Style). Su Dongpo was this brilliant scholar and aesthete who ended up exiled and writing a lot about the joys of pork.

Basically you take pork belly, skin-on, cut it in big squares, and then marinate, steam, braise, and so on. Done right, it takes two days or more. You serve it with pancakes or buns and scallion brushes, as with Peking Duck.

Made perfectly, you should have these meltingly-soft squares of pork, flavored not unlike red-cooked (hui-guo) meats, in which 90% of the fat has rendered out but the matrix in which it was naturally held is intact. This makes the already super-soft braised pork even softer and moister: it has a texture not unlike custard.

If anyone knows where to find a really good recipe -- and this is NOT something for a "simplified" method sort of approach -- I'd love to hear about it.
post #23 of 26
Hey Abe,

How'd it end up? Was it worth the time taken? I bet it was nice :) Always been interested in this one since I first saw it, but never seem to be able to find pork belly when I have the time and when I find it I never have the time!! I don't get it then cuz I don't like freezing meat, seems to lose something in the process.

Daina
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Came out great!! Very tastey. I ended up cooking it in the oven, then broiling it at the end, the oven make it puff back up, so it wasn't pressed anymore, i think the pan would have worked better, and make something on top to hold them down so they don't puff up.
post #25 of 26
Great :) now you've been the guinea pig we can all try it hehe. Thanks for geting back with the result

Daina
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #26 of 26
Which recipe did you use?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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