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Whetstone guide rails

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I was looking at buying a new whetsone as I wanted a courser grit then what I already own and discovered that Global make guide rails for whetstones. Basicly they clip onto the knife and keep it at the correct angle, don't know what angle it works to. Anyway I have been avoiding recommending Japanese knives to some friends due to them having to learn how to sharpen them correctly. If these work well I might start recommending them.

Has anybody used them before, and if so how do you find them.

Thanks
post #2 of 13
Ive always found guide rails a bit awkward, if you can learn to hold the knife at the correct angle (it does take practise) there is no need for them. Its well worth the extra effort. This is just my opinion.
post #3 of 13
They tend to slow you down and are a real hassle in a knife with much curvature to the edge. It can help you learn to hold an angle.

Overall I don't think they're worth it unless you're going for a kit like the Edge Pro.
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 13
I agree with the previous two posts. They are a pain in the butt and offer zero flexibility. It's much better to put in a little time and learn how to free hand.
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Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
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post #5 of 13
I am just a housewife cook who has global knives, and I use the guard clips to sharpen them. I am no way educated enough to sharpen my knives without them. I am afraid I will ruin them. I think if you do not have expierence with knives, they work well. They are not for everyone that is for sure.
post #6 of 13
Learning to freehand is largely a matter of understanding some (very, very) basic theory, and the muscle memory to be able to hold a reasonably constant angle. A guide like these (a binder clip, a bit of thin cardboard for shimming, and a protractor to get the angle right, work just as well and are cheaper (and found in many households)) can help immensely with that muscle memory, and with allowing hte user to focus on one thing at a time. With a little experience, the user can simply stop using them.
post #7 of 13
The Global guides are not bad if you are starting out and need time to get the feel of the angles before you try freehand.
For a couple of bucks you get two clips one for a small and one a larger blade that hold around an 18 degree angle.
post #8 of 13
The factory set for Global is 15* with 50/50 symmetry.

Edge guide clamps are gimmicks and tend to bring as many problems as they solve.

One problem with clip on guides is that they effectively shorten the stone by at least the width of the knife.

Another problem with guides for knives that are substantially longer than the stone is wide, is that the knife needs to be reclamped, and it's not always easy to establish the same sharpening angle at a different clamping point. If you think about it you'll realize that clip ons don't automatically create a particular angle, but that the angle depends on how far the spine is from the edge where the clip is clamped.

I don't know Global clips, but if you absolutely muse use clips, at least look at the set at Razor's Edge sharpening -- the Jim Juranitch site. Juranitch may sell a few gimmicks, but he does not sell crap. I can say the same thing about Lee at Lee Valley ("no crap") with one exception. Unfortunately, that's the DMT guide they sell under their own name really isn't very good at all. Too much flex. Obviously, in my opinion, you should avoid this clamp-on under whatever name it' sold.

Free hand sharpening isn't very difficult to learn to do well -- but it does take some time and effort. It's the best way to sharpen.

If you feel that free handing is something you won't or can't do, the next best way of dealing with sharpening is a "rod guide" such as an Edge Pro, Lansky or Gatco. All of these are easier to learn than free handing. Each company makes a couple of kits that will handle your Globals. Edge Pro is by far the best, but not inexpensive. Kit 2, which is the way to go for most people, is around $200. By comparison you can get a Lansky diamond kit plus a couple of options for under $100.

Don't skimp on your whetstones. You need more than one, and quality makes a difference. At this time there is every reason to buy Japanese ceramic water stones, and no reason to buy traditional western "oil stones."

Hope this helps,
BDL
post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by hosko View Post

I was looking at buying a new whetsone as I wanted a courser grit then what I already own and discovered that Global make guide rails for whetstones. Basicly they clip onto the knife and keep it at the correct angle, don't know what angle it works to. Anyway I have been avoiding recommending Japanese knives to some friends due to them having to learn how to sharpen them correctly. If these work well I might start recommending them.

Has anybody used them before, and if so how do you find them.

Thanks


Hi i have been a chef for six years now and globals are 1 of the best knives i have ever used.As long as you use the small guard rail your knife edge should be perfect.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by grunter View Post

The Global guides are not bad if you are starting out and need time to get the feel of the angles before you try freehand.
For a couple of bucks you get two clips one for a small and one a larger blade that hold around an 18 degree a

THE angle for gloabal is atully around 10-15

post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Smith View Post

THE angle for gloabal is atully around 10-15


My full set go through anything like butter

post #12 of 13

The factory bevel angle for western style Globals is actually, exactly, 15*.  It is not 10-15%.  Global western style knives are too soft to hold a 10* without the edge collapsing.  If 18* is too obtuse -- and it is -- 10* is too acute; way too acute. 

 

FWIW, MinoSharp and Global branded pull-through sharpeners (same thing) are designed to sharpen a 15* set.   

 

BDL

post #13 of 13

Originally Posted by Simon Smith

THE angle for gloabal is atully around 10-15

 

Simon,

 

It happens to the best of us; but the last post in this thread was more than three and a half years ago.

 

For your own information, the factory bevel angle for western style Global knives is actually 15*.  It is not 10-15*.  Global western style knives are too soft to hold a 10* bevel angle without the edge collapsing at the slightest provocation and requiring near constant steeling.  If 18* is somewhat too obtuse for best performance, 10* is way too acute.  MinoSharp and Global branded pull-through sharpeners (same thing) are designed to sharpen a 15* set.   

 

BDL


Edited by boar_d_laze - 10/26/12 at 9:45am
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