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Sifted Flour vs unsifted flour

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Many very kosher establishments require you to sift the flour with a very fine sifter since bugs were found in alot of brands of flour. (Eating bugs is a no-no hence vegetables and fruit are thoroughly inspected also)
If I am making a cake using let's say 2 cups of regular unsifted flour and I now have to make the same recipe using sifted flour - how would I know how much flour to put into the cake? Does it go by weight of the flour?
post #2 of 7
The best way to measure flour is by weight. Unfortunately a lot of home recipe books only specify volume measurements. What you can do is weigh the amount of your unsifted flour, then substitute an equal weight of sifted flour and that will work.
post #3 of 7

sifted flour

Take the two cups sift them thoroughly and use that in the recipe. The weight will be the same, although you will have a slight change in the consistency of the batter, it should still work without any problem. You will still be using the same amount of flour the recipe calls for. As the batter may be lighter also keep an eye on the cooking time as well. Be careful not to overmix the batter.
Robin
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Robin
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post #4 of 7
I don't know why this is under the professional Pastry Chef's forum.

Anyone who bakes for a living uses a scale--have been doing so for thousands of years (see the Egyptian graffiti on pyramid walls--bakers using beam scales).

Most Chefs and bakers would introduce thier shoe to someone's rear-end if they caught them measuring flour or sugar by the cup: It's very innacurate, time consuming, and messy. A good electronic scale that goes up to 5 kgs (10 lbs) shouldn't cost more than a hundred. Get one.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 7
I agree with you on the scale, but from the way the question was asked led me to believe that this was a recipe not for work but for home use, and in a pinch when you don"t have a scale, this method will work. Especially if the only type of measurement they have for the recipe is in volume not weight. Of course professionals would convert this to weight not volume but this doesn't sound like someone who knows how to do that....yet, but they are learning. Asking should get answers not criticism for not knowing.

FYI 1 kilo is equal to 2.2 pounds so 5 kilos is 11 lbs.
Robin
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Robin
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post #6 of 7

Chef Robin
Thank you for the way you replied. Starting a career with criticism probably will not get anyone to far and  I appreciate you for sticking up for us who have lesser knowlege. I myself know that weighing is more accurate but there is much I do not know yet. Thanks

post #7 of 7
Your welcome. Never be afraid to ask questions.  
Robin
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Robin
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