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Red Wattle Pigs

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
One of our farmers is raising 4 red wattle pigs, probably 230-260# and butchering for a couple of the chefs and a slow food guy. I asked if he'd be up for raising a long hair hungarian....he said nope. There are a few here now raising mule foots up to 600#.....it's really fun being in pig country.

Any of you try various heirloom breeds? what's your experience been?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #2 of 11
Dyslexia set in and this is how I read it:

My bad.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
yep tasty piggy treats....you know that pigs ARE omnivores.....I'm thinkin' chefs can be really tough and chewy, but oh so tender close to the bone....slow foods guys are an acquired taste.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #4 of 11
On topic, I've had a few half pigs from my bro-in-law. I don't know the breed off hand but it was better than the mainstream pork in the styrofoam tray stuff.

I'll have to ask what breed he likes to raise.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 11
Any hog raised at home is going to be better tasting than the poor cage raised beasts available in the market. I've thought about rare pork breeds but there are none available here, so we have to go with whatever's for sale. We raise Guinea Jersey cattle, Navajo Churro sheep and Toggenburg Dairy goats. The cattle are dual purpose. We have a small permanent dairy herd for home milk and cheese and for sale to neighbors. They also produce fabulous meat. The sheep are our main business, producing wool for handweavers. Churro meat is mild, tender and much lower in fat than market raised lamb. Excess rams are raised for slaughter. All of our meat is grass fed, with no corn or grain supplementation.
post #6 of 11
I used to raise pigs for 4-H and they end up soo good. Once I get a freezer big enough I will be buying 1/2 pigs from the 4-H kids.
Is a hippopotamus a hippopotamus or just a really cool opotamous? - Mitch Hedburg
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Is a hippopotamus a hippopotamus or just a really cool opotamous? - Mitch Hedburg
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post #7 of 11
Anybody within driving distance of a county fair is missing a bet if they don't go check out the market animals available from 4H and FFA kids. You can bid at auction, but there will always be animals that don't sell, and they can be real bargains. Raised humanely by hand and generally without growth hormones. Most fairs also have local slaughter houses on site so your purchase can be processed, cut and wrapped for you for a nominal per pound fee. Our local fair last year had a slaughter house rep there for buyers. They were charging .38 a finished pound for processing. Smokin' deal. The only drawback is that in general, 4H and FFA focus on standard market breeds of pork, lamb and beef. It's unlikely, but not impossible to find any heritage breeds being raised. This is an issue that I've taken up several times with our local 4H and FFA leaders. My kids were finally able to enter their Churro sheep in our local fair and sell both breeding animals as well as market lambs at auction. They won all the ribbons in their classes, as they were the only sheep kids who were showing a rare breed!
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
.38 cents a # butchered, if that's for a lamb it's one thing but, I pay 25-30 dollars for a USDA killed cut in half, cleaned pig. Approx 10 cents a pound....most of the pigs are about 275-300, though there have been a couple of 100, and one 400 tammworth.

Small Farm Show has a bunch of heirloom critters. MO is pretty flush with various heirloom varieties of animals.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #9 of 11
You're very lucky to have access to those rare breeds, and to those processing fees. Processing here is cheaper if you deal directly with the slaughter house, most of the fairs add a premium for the convenience. I think a lot of the fair buyers only buy at the fairs and are often local businesses who are doing it to help the kids and for the PR, so it's a write off for them. I do my own processing so it's not an issue for me anyhow.
post #10 of 11
Thread Starter 
guess I should specify, there is a set rate $25-30 to butcher a pig, if you have them cut it into pieces then it costs more....I've no idea what that would cost.

Yes, we are very fortunate in this area to have such a great selection of family farm raised meats......most heirloom, many mixes of breeds....we've got some super lamb from hair sheep, chickens are just to tasty....but pork has got to be my favorite. As Dan Barber said on Top Chef, it's the outter fat on a good pig that is some of the tastiest. Simply cooked, searring with salt then finishing in the oven, spicy/sweet/sour sauce on the side....latest is mustarde.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #11 of 11
I guess we had a misunderstanding of terms. To me, butchering is cutting, wrapping and freezing, exclusive of slaughter. The price I mentioned included transportation from the fair to the plant and slaughter, cutting, wrapping and freezing. So it really is a pretty good deal. I agree with you that crispy roast pork is nearly the perfect food. When we have our matanza (slaughter party) in the fall everybody can't wait for the chicharrones to come out of the boiling lard. Now I'm hungry!
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