or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

ORANGE egg yolks

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Just got in an 18 pack of Aracana eggs from a local grower, now I've bought local eggs from various farmers for years....but these have the darkest orange yolks I've ever seen. Do any of you know what would cause rich yolks?
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #2 of 12
What the chickens ate.

Are the shells those beautiful pastel colors?
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
yep, blue/green.....they are free ranging birds, Gina the farmer said they even go out into the cow field. It's just bizarre to see them this orange and rich. I made chocolate cherry rolls yesterday and the dough was an apricot color from the egg yolks. In the past farmers have brought in dk yellow or orange but these eggs are super orange. I've got some goose and duck eggs coming in this Sat. Any suggestions? Thought I'd blow them out for Easter decorations but if you've got any ideas I may crack them instead.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #4 of 12
Sounds to me like they were fed a diet rich in Marigold pedals.
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #5 of 12
Free range chicken eggs will vary in their yolk color according to what they're grazing on more than their breed. We have Aracaunas, Buff and Black Orpingtons and Rhode Island Reds, and their yolks are all pretty similar all the time. Free range yolks are invariably darker and richer tasting that those watery egg-like objects from the grocery store.
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
then there must be a difference in seasons, if the chickens are outside pecking away, then what's available will vary to some degree with the seasons. Have you noticed a difference?
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #7 of 12
Mmmmm, I'm drooling over the thought of a sunny side egg with toast for dipping. Mmmm, or what about egg soldiers. Seriously, throw me some eggs.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

Reply
post #8 of 12
There are definitely seasonal differences for us. Chickens lay eggs in response to day length. For that reason, commercial egg farms keep lights on in their laying houses to fool the birds into laying year round. This wears the hens out in 18-24 months, and those hens are rotated out and slaughtered for processing into such useful things as pet food and school lunches...Some smaller producers will put lights on timers in their henhouses to increase the length of the day, accomplishing something similar. We don't do that. Every hen in our flock is an investment in time and feed and I want to keep them producing as many years as possible. Giving them a winter break allows them to gain weight and rest up for next year's laying. Having said that, some breeds will lay longer into the fall and even during the winter. Our Buff Orpingtons slow down, but never completely stop laying. They keep us in eggs all winter. The Aracaunas quit early, usually in late September. They are just now starting up again. Oops, looks like I've gone off base into one of my favorite rants. My apologies! Back on topic, our winter eggs have darker and richer yolks. I don't know why. The chickens still hunt and peck with the goats and sheep, but in the winter they are more dependent on bagged feed, since there is less forage for them. No tasty bugs etc. Maybe the fact that their diet changes is the key, but I doubt it's the feed. If it was the feed, you'd expect those poor commercial birds to have darker yolks, because they never get the chance to eat a bug or blade of fresh grass. Still, I think it's seasonal somehow due to diet.
post #9 of 12
i love using these eggs in my baking - as it's gluten free, the end product is pale and these eggs give a richer color. they also taste wonderful on their own. i'm fortunate that my husband has an employee who sells me a couple of dozen every other week. and at $2/doz compared to about $3 for grocery store eggs i'm a happy camper.
kathee
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
cool, I'll ask chicken farmer about winter feed for the chickens.....the viscosity seems thicker too, this is comparing them to other good farm eggs.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #11 of 12
I believe that a deep orange color usually arises from a diet rich in beta-carotene and leafy green veg. Mysteriously, it also tastes better than the pale ones grown on a diet of chemical-injected ground-up chicken and waste. Isn't that surprising? Who'da guessed it.
post #12 of 12
he oranger the better for me!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking