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Duck and Goose eggs.....

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
was just traded 6 duck eggs and 4 goose eggs, any suggestions for their use?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #2 of 11
The Chinese ferment the duck eggs. 1000 year old eggs and other such treatments. Never actually tried them yet.
post #3 of 11
Put in warm place and try and hatch ducks and geeses!:D
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #4 of 11
Never had a goose egg but used to eat a lot of duck eggs for breakfast when I was much younger. Cooked them just like a fried or scrambled chicken egg.
post #5 of 11
I like duck eggs scrambled or poached.
post #6 of 11
We have both here. They are interchangeable with chicken eggs, but bear in mind that they both have a higher yolk to white ratio than chicken eggs, making them richer and more intensely flavored. They are great in baked items that you want to be very rich, Chalah for example. Wonderful in custards, ice cream and sauces. They may make more standard baked items a bit crumbly or mealy due to the extra fat. Fry some up, tasty!
post #7 of 11
Get someone who really likes these to pick one out for you -- they're not all equal quality. But don't buy a package yourself even if you know the brand is excellent, because a lot of people don't like them. I hate them, for what it's worth. But even if I liked them, I would not get involved in trying to work out how to make them myself from fresh duck and goose eggs -- I'd use those like the rich, flavorful (and somewhat large, in the case of goose) eggs they are.
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 
not into 1000 year eggs, I pick um out of congee:o

It's so cool to see the differences, the chicken eggs have been deep orange and rich for the past couple of months. These duck egg shells are illuminscent.....
I've been blowing out blue & green aracona eggs for easter display, thought I'd do the same with the duck duck goose eggs....viscosity of duck whites is supposed to be much thicker than chicken eggs, kinda wanted to whip them and lighten something...
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #9 of 11
Duck whites can be hard to whip unless really fresh. I've used cream of tartar to keep them from separating, which they seem to like to do. I don't like them for meringue.
post #10 of 11
Duck eggs are one of my favorite things to eat in the world. The yolks, oh man, so rich and creamy. While I have tried them many ways I gotta say its hard to beat them poached on a salad of slightly bitter greens. Try them with a duck breast for a tricked out take on a cobb salad. Oh, you can't beat them for a mayonnaise either.

Goose eggs, not so crazy about. From my experience they tip the scales from rich and fatty straight into greasy and heavy. That said I'm sure you know how much eggs of any type will vary from producer to producer.

--Al
post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
yep, these are from small multi animal family farm.....NYTimes has a recipe for eggs in pergatory, polenta with chestnuts, ragu with pig belly, shoulder and proscuitto....poach the egg in ragu, serve over polenta....looks yummmmm.....

bet it'd be a great use of duck eggs
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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