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Bakeware and Utensil Questions

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hi Everyone --

I'm new to this board, and I fear I am double-posting. Please forgive.

I have two questions:

Re: non-stick rectangular cake pans: what does one use to cut the cake without scratching the non-stick surface? I'm getting tired of replacing my pans.

Does anyone know if the Williams-Sonoma gold bakeware is made in America? I don't want anything non-stick from China.

Thank you -- I look forward to learning a lot here!

Lucy
post #2 of 9
Don't use non stick.
Paper your pan and/or spray with bakers joy.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #3 of 9
I agree with m, but add the following:

If you do use non-stick, use parchment or lubrication anyway. Sometimes the best lubrication is greasing the pan, sometimes it's grease plus flour.

When the cake cools, it will shrink. This movement will start to release the cake from the sides and bottom of the pan. The temperature of the cake also plays a part in how it easy it is to release. Oddly, hot cake and cold cake stick more than warm cake. It's usually best for all concerned (cake, pan, diners) if the cake is removed from the pan and turned out onto a rack as soon as soon as the pan is cool enough for a normal person (like you) to touch comfortably (skosh less than 105*F). The exceptions to "usually best" are with custard-like cakes (like cheesecakes), which should be completely cool (chilled even) before attempting to take from the pan.

Often we use a knife to complete the release the cake from the side of the pan. Use a blunt knife with a rounded end, such as a butter or palette (thin spatula) knife. You could also use a bamboo skewer if you like. If you don't have at least one each regular and offset palette knives, you should. Like a bench knife, they're among the baker's best friends. They're invaluable for icing and a ton of other purposes.

Don't scour your cake pans. Rather soak well before washing them.

BDL
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
I use Pam spray with the nonstick.

I use a 13x9 pan; I do not turn it out onto a plate. I don't have any plates that big. I leave it in the pan and cut each piece individually. It's probably best that I not get a non-stick pan.

Thanks
Lucy
post #5 of 9
You could also use a non-metal cutter to minimize scratches to the pans. The one I like best is actually a plastic surreated knife intended for cutting lettuce. The blade is fairly thin, but also wide enough to be used as a server if necessary. They're available very cheap at WalMart.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 

Lettuce knife - great idea!

That's just the sort of solution I was looking for. Many thanks!

Lucy
post #7 of 9
Cut a piece of cardboard a little larger then the pan, cover it with foil invert your cake onto this . You can make whatever size you want ,No storage problems, no washing just throw it away. and use a plastic serrated knife to cut .
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #8 of 9
The last few years I've gotten completely away from metal bakeware for pies and cakes and have switched to glazed stoneware. Durable and very easy cleanup.

I believe Williams-Sonoma's bakeware is made by Chicago Metallic.
If you can't put it on a plate, it probably isn't all that important.

http://eatingcolorado.wordpress.com/
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If you can't put it on a plate, it probably isn't all that important.

http://eatingcolorado.wordpress.com/
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post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

FYI: Where CIA Masters' Collection is manufactured

This is what the company told me who has the license for the CIA Masters' Collection:

"The cutlery is produced in Taiwan, the stoneware pie plate is produced in Thailand and all other items (e.g., bakeware) are from China."

I personally don't want any non-stick from China, hence my question to CIA.

Lucy
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