or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Freezing Alfredo Sauce
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Freezing Alfredo Sauce

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
I've been having some trouble figuring out how to preserve alfredo sauce, the kind that already comes in a jar (made by Classico).

Is it safe to freeze it? What would I store it in, if I put it in the freezer -- a piece of plastic tupperware, or something else?

Also, when I'm ready to thaw it, would there be a way to do so without it getting all watery and icky during the thawing process?
post #2 of 13
Unfortunately you wont be able to get around the watery issues, the Classico Alfredo has starch in it that isnt designed to be frozen. Once you freeze it the starch molecules will "pop" and the water wont be retained any longer thus a watery sauce.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

So that leads me to my next question...

Are there any types of Alfredo Sauce that will freeze and thaw well?

Perhaps a homemade variety?
post #4 of 13
I understand not wanting to waste the remainder of the sauce but it's just not worth the effort. Considering a real Alfredo sauce is basically a liaison it really will not reheats well and freezes even worse. I understand you're not working with anything close to that in a store product but it's all down hill from there. :look: If you have a food saver you can use it and the jar attachment to get maybe 2 weeks out of it but that might be pushing it.

My suggestion would be to maybe do some form of potato gratin, doctor it up with some Swiss Gruyere and tarragon for eggs or even topping for veg with the left overs in a day or two. If it gets runny, just do a quick slurry to re thicken. JMHPO
post #5 of 13
Dont make so much in excess, that way there wont be so much leftover to freeze. It is not worth the time and effort to freeze it.
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #6 of 13
But that would make too much sense Chef Ed. I was always taught to make an Alfredo in the pan "al minute".
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #7 of 13
An Alfredo is a definite thing. It was created by a Roman restaurateur for his wife; then made famous when Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford visited the restaurant and repeatedly on their honeymoon (which received extensive media coverage at the time). While the dish may not have been quite as famous as the couple, it has a history and there's a right way of making it. Variation which include cream may be delicious and may even be "like Alfredo," but they aren't the McCoy. In much the same way a Caesar salad doesn't contain sour cream, there are limits.

Real "Alfredo" is simply cheese and butter. The butter must be so well creamed, then the cheese so thoroughly worked in the ingredients form a single cream when they meet the heat from the pasta.

Bottom line on Alfredo, it's fun to know this stuff but don't take me too seriously. If you like it -- that's all that counts.

In any case, the key with fresh Alfredo or like-Alfredo is to make only as much as you will use at the time. With your bottled sauce-they-call-Alfredo -- It will last about a week covered in the refrigerator. Beyond that it should be discarded.

Good luck with it,
BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #8 of 13
So was I, however some places make like a mornay and then just toss cooked pasta in it. I think thats what he is doing.

Mine was butter, cheese , heavy cream and in some cases finished with a laisson or egg yolk., Your way was probably close to this.:D
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #9 of 13
Mine was exactly the same with the addition of some of the starchy pasta water for a little finish and shine, and I used egg yolk. Old skool FTW!! :chef:
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #10 of 13
Not only old school, the right way. Today everything is fake and instant.:D
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #11 of 13
I was thought that a Liaison was binding of cream sauces with egg yolks. May be just old terminology that I'm drawing from.

Here is the recipe I learned oh so long ago. Note that it was mostly pinches, handfuls or nondescript measurements so I added what I later used in a couple of my kitchens.

Heavy cream, 40% fresh. 8oz. vol
butter, whole, unsalted. 2oz. wt
nutmeg, fresh grated Pinch
Reggiano Parmigiana, grated 1cup
Fettuccini 10oz wt
egg yolk 1ea
s&p to taste
Parsley, chopped,Italian flat as needed
Reggiano, shaved 1 oz. wt

In saute' pan, bring cream to a boil over med-high flame. Boil for 1 minute. Add butter and cheese and incorporate. Add nutmeg and season to taste. Toss in liberal amount (10oz wt) of cooked, hot and well drained Fettuccini noodles. Toss well and remove from heat. Add one egg yolk off heat and incorporate well. Plate and serve garnished with chopped parsley and shaved Reggiano.:D
post #12 of 13
I posted this quite awhile ago. I'd like to keep the flame of the original burning, because it's a truly wonderful recipe -- light, fresh and delicious with all of the creamy, cheesiness you can handle.

Mangia!
BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #13 of 13
Hi DudePower :)



I would urge you to give one of the methods of alfredo sauce a try. Alfredo sauce can be made easily in the time it takes to boil the water for the pasta. It can also be scaled up or down to suit the number of people you want to serve (from one person to several).

Please do give it a try>>>

dan
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Freezing Alfredo Sauce