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How do you handle this?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
The other night one of the waitresses came back with a plate and said there was a big long hair in it and the customer would lke it to be replaced with a different entree, which we did. The problem was, it was the customers's own hair. My hair is long, dark and straight. I always have it rolled up in a bun with a hair net. The other cook has 1/4" long hair and had a bandana covering his entire head. The found hair was long, blond with a spiral perm and dark roots- the customer's hair. I told the waitress to tell the table we would replace the food, but that no one working there had hair of that type. I don't think she did, and the comment card they left said the best part of the meal was the hair in her (the writer's) sister's food. How do you handle something like this? These people left the place thinking they had gotten hair in their food from one of our employees when in fact it was their own. Any thoughts?
post #2 of 10
not much you can do other than know its not ur fault at all.. unless you slap em with a dna test and prove its the persons hair in question.:D
post #3 of 10
i hate when people try to play this scam. is this person a regular customer or just someone passing through? i've always replaced the food, or taken it off the check.
post #4 of 10
You always replace the food, graciously, no questions.


Then you ridicule them in the kitchen.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #5 of 10
Agreed, though the situation is more something for FOH to worry about and deal with than the kitchen.
post #6 of 10
This has happened to me a few times, Each time I had to take the blame. The customer will never admit it was their hair. The bad thing is, you did everything right, and still didn't win.
I had a guy in Hawaii call me to the counter one night and show me the fly in his mashed potatoes. I almost died and did whatever I had to do to make it right. I talked to the cooks and they said no flies in here. A week later I was walking behind the same guy sitting at the counter, and he was telling the waitress he had a fly in his mashed potatoes. I walked over and stood next to him, I didn"t say a word, he walked out the door. He brought in his own flies. See the hair doesn't sound all that bad now, does it ?................Sorry you had to go thru that, But you did the right thing....Bill
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys. Now I'm remembering the time years ago in a different place where someone "found" glass in their salad. Unfortunately for them, it was a piece of blue glass and we had no blue glass in the building. Anything made of glass was either clear or amber. I showed them the door, and told them to never come in again. As for the hair thing, I didn't mind replacing the food, I just feel bad that they thought it came from us. Maybe the other people at the table realized it was hers. I was at Stuart Anderson's Cattle Company in the twin cities once, with a bunch of people, and my friend had a green worm crawling around on her broccoli. Don't know how it survived the broccoli being cooked, but it did. The waitress was mortified. My friend just asked her to take the broccoli off her plate and said don't worry about it. The manager came by later to tell us some story about getting a worm on his lettuce somewhere when he was a kid and his mother telling him to just eat it anyway. We all kind of laughed about it, but they never did anything about it. They didn't comp. her meal, give her a discount, offer a drink, nothing. Still amazes me, because we didn't make a big deal of it. You'd think they would have bent over backwards because the place was full and no one aruond us even knew anything was wrong.
post #8 of 10
Suggest you read Danny Meyers book "Setting The Table". He is probably one of the most successful rest. Gurus in New York Many answers like this in his book. He is partners with Tom Collechio, Gramarcy Pk Tavern, Union sq. Cafe, Blue smoke etc.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #9 of 10
We can all agree to replace the food. Keep it on the check and throw a dessert at them, take off a corkage fee, whatever...

It's just unfortunate that in replacing the food you're essentially admitting you made the mistake, not the FOH or it being the customer's own hair.
post #10 of 10
I guess it's all in how you look at it.
If the customer has a nosebleed all over their plate, I am going to offer to replace the food.
Obviously not my mistake, but I will do what is needed to make sure they have a nice dining experience.
So IMHO, replacing the food admits nothing other than that I am a generous host.
I can't help how the diners themselves look at it.


And then of course, the kitchen is going to make fun of them.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Reply
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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