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Using Sour Dough Starters

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
So, using Dan Leader's levain system, I've finally got a sourdough mother going. Already made bread with it. That's no problem.

What I need to learn is how to recycle the throw-away part of the chef. That is, when I feed it each week I remove a cup of the chef and replace it with flour and water. I'm looking for ways of using that.

For instance, can I use that cup to make pancakes? If so, how would I go about doing that?

What about other uses besides making bread?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #2 of 8
sure, add it to pancakes or even coffee cake.
enjoy!
in the bakeshop, we never want to waste!
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #3 of 8
I agree with m brown and will add that while doing some recent reading about sourdoughs I saw a comment about giving it to someone who might be interested in making sourdoughs but hasn't started yet. I recall my father doing this during the '70's when we ate a lot of sourdough stuff.
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Michele, could you expand on "add it to pancakes?" If I start with a cup of levain, what else to I add to it in terms of more flour and liquid?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 8

Recipe

You're getting 1 cup of extra per feeding?

SOUR DOUGH PANCAKES

Ingredients:
1 cup starter
1-1/2 cup AP Flour
1 cup milk
1 egg
3 + 1 tbs butter (or shortening)
2 tbs sugar
1 tsp double acting baking powder
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt,
milk or water as necessary

Technique:
Night Before:
In a bowl large enough to allow doubling, mix the starter with the flour and 1 cup of the milk. Stir well to get air in it. Cover with cling wrap, and hold overnight in a warm (75F-85F) place. Tip: If your kitchen isn't that warm, place a pan of very hot water in the bottom of the oven, the bowl of starter on the rack above it and close the oven door. That will do fine.

Morning of:
Beat the egg. Mix in the remaining ingredients with just enough water or milk so the dry ingredients dissolve.

Mix the egg mixture with the sourdough batter. Add enough milk or water to form a batter of whatever consistency you like. Thicker for fluffier pancakes, thinner for thinner. The baking soda will make the batter foam. Allow the batter to settle long enough to cook bacon and/or sausage (about ten minutes, if you can't take a hint).

Meanwhile preheat your griddle to medium. More pancakes are ruined by too much heat than by too little. Check the heat by sprinkling a few drops of water on the griddle. They should neither sit, nor spit and hiss, but dance. When the griddle is preheated, grease the griddle with the remaining tbs of shortening and make a test pancake (the first pancake always comes out poorly). Give it to the dog. 'Atta a good pooch! You may want to take a bite yourself for scientific purposes.

This is pure pancake gold, so remember it. If the first side of the first pancake was not an even golden brown, that resulted from too much grease on the griddle combined with too much heat. The first pancake itself took care of the excess grease, which leaves the heat. Again, the sacrificial pancake took a lot of heat off the griddle so get the next batch on quick -- but also lower the temperature slightly.

Variation: Use two cups of starter and omit the extra flour, milk and the overnight proof. Forgot the BP and bump the soda to 1 tsp.

Enjoy,
BDL

PS. As always... Original recipe, blah blah permission blah blah credit Boar D. Laze. Yadda yadda kindness yadda yadda COOK FOOD GOOD: American Cooking and Technique for Beginners and Intermediates.
post #6 of 8
Thread Starter 
Sounds like a plan. Thanks.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
>You're getting 1 cup of extra per feeding?<

OK, this was the first feeding since making the levain. I got two cups of the chef, which is about what I expected from Leader's instructions. One cup was kept as the starter, with additions. The second one is for the pancakes, which I'll cook up tomorrow morning.

One question, BDL. Why do I need the additional leavening? Isn't the starter supposed to substitute for yeast, baking powder, and baking soda?

>the first pancake always comes out poorly<

Ain't that the truth!!
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 8
Because you've doubled it the night before, the yeast hasn't had time to develop real character, and the batter is under-colonized (is that a word?). Not enough eager yeast cells. If you used two cups of starter, you could get by without any powder at all, just soda.

You'll see why you want soda as soon as you mix it in. Fun stuff.

BDL
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