New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Wasabi Knives

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
I am thinking about getting some Wasabi's. The chef at my new job has a set, and I have to get new knives (Kosher kitchen and all of my knives have been used on non-Kosher food). They seem like decent knives, and they are made by Kershaw, same as Shun. Anyone have an opinion?
Bork Bork Bork!
Reply
Bork Bork Bork!
Reply
post #2 of 20
You're going to need at least two sets, maybe three. One fleischig, one milchig, and possibly one pareve. You can't use the same knife to cut an onion for a cheese omelette as you would for a salami omelette.

I've no personal experience with the Wasabi, but am told it is as it's priced. Bottom of the line. They sharpen faily well for inexpensive stainless, and dull quickly. My impression is that they're comparable to Forschner Fibrox and Rosewood. Acceptable work knives, but not worth dreaming about.

I'm not a fan of the Shun Kershaws, but personal taste aside they're very different and better knives than the Wasabi. Don't let the manufacturer's name confuse you.

BDL
post #3 of 20
BDL what knives do you suggest in the 100.00 range? And I only cook at home, but want something that maintains an edge.

Should a person try different brands or do most people stick with the same ones they're use to?
post #4 of 20
BDL is right , however if the place you are going to work at is dairy you need only 1 set . Most pareve products can be cut with table knives. The place itself in some cases supply the knives to assure the upholding of the Kashruth, and no tools from outside can be used.
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the tips. The entire restaurant is only Pareve, so only one set. I just decided to go with Globals. They've been ok for me so far, so I'll stick with it.
Bork Bork Bork!
Reply
Bork Bork Bork!
Reply
post #6 of 20
Some people report hand pain from working with Globals, but if they've been comfortable to you for awhile they're a great choice. They're really agile.

Sorry I didn't get back to you on the $100 knives; I forgot all about the post and the thread until you just posted again today. If you still want low-mid recommendations I can give them, but Glolbal B. Good. More, the recommendations would be of the take it on faith variety. Compared to some of the really good knives available online, I can't recommend any lines you can pretend to try at a local retailer. That lack of availability puts off a lot of people. Until last year I would have said, Forschner Fibrox and Rosewood (same blades, different handles), especially when MAC prices went way up, because Forschners are decent. But their chef's knives have been totally superceded by a number of Japanese choices.

BDL
post #7 of 20
Thanks BDL, I've been watching the other knife thread and getting an idea of whats out there, every bit helps
post #8 of 20

I've been really happy with my Wasabi chef's knife, so I highly recommend it.  I just can't help myself commenting on the superstition that still pervades the world in so many forms.  I was amazed by your statement that if a knife has touched non-Kosher food, it's somehow "contaminated"?!!  People of the world, leave silly old superstitions behind!  Pork nor any other food can't contaminate steel!!!  Gawd!

post #9 of 20
The Wasabis were the worse stainless steel blades I had ever to sharpen; I suspect huge carbides.
I was unpleasantly surprised by Peter's remarks about kashrut. Should that kind of discussion take place -- let it be not here, and only within the circle of followers of these rules.
post #10 of 20

as I am very new to the world of knives, help me out, Wasbi is a brand or type of knife?

I google searched and found Kai Wasabi black knives... and seeing as BDL is AOL...

post #11 of 20
It's an entry series by Kai / Kershaw.

http://www.knifeworks.com/kershawshunwasabiseries.aspx
post #12 of 20
Peter everyone has a right to their opinion but to classify part of ones religious beliefs "silly superstition" is insulting and has no place in a medium such as this. Please refrain from these type of comments in the future
post #13 of 20

I have a Wasabi Santoku, and it's alright.  I got mine for $25 on eBay, so I wasn't really expecting that much from it.   I took the original edge off it, then put a single-sided edge on it at about 15 degrees. It holds up reasonably well, as I only have to put the stone to it about every couple of weeks for a quick touch-up.    It's one of my main work knives, so it sees a lot of action every day.  

   Obviously, it's not the prettiest thing around, nor is it magic. But for the price, it does the job as good as any other.  

post #14 of 20
Could you elaborate on that "single-sided edge" at 15 degree? Do you mean you've transformed your santoku into a single-bevel??
post #15 of 20

Totally agree with Peter - it is impossible to contaminate steel with any food permanently so to think that it can is "superstitious nonsense" whether a religion codified it or not

post #16 of 20

Are banal observations of religious dogma and symbolic observance, and of poor taste, an appropriate topic for Cheftalk?

post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bellsmoke View Post

Totally agree with Peter - it is impossible to contaminate steel with any food permanently so to think that it can is "superstitious nonsense" whether a religion codified it or not

I wonder you reopen an old thread to spread your message of intolerance. Again, should that kind of discussion take place -- let it be not here, and only within the circle of followers of these rules.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bellsmoke View Post
 

Totally agree with Peter - it is impossible to contaminate steel with any food permanently so to think that it can is "superstitious nonsense" whether a religion codified it or not

Not to encourage this idiotic discussion, but technically speaking the issue here is not one of belief, as has been suggested.

 

Jewish law is extremely complex and has been hotly contested for over 2000 years. At base, the law is the core of observant Jewish life, not belief. I always had trouble getting my college students to grasp this. It's not a question of "what it says in the Bible," for example, or "what you believe God wants." These things have nothing to do with it -- literally nothing.

 

The debates in Talmud that have eventuated in the current system of utensil separation, contamination, purification, and so forth are very extensive and wide-ranging. It is important to recognize that you are in every way welcome to participate in those debates. I mean this very seriously: it is not true that you can't argue about these things because Jews say that's what God has decided so there. On the contrary!

 

Similarly, these legal principles have nothing whatever to do with morality unless you understand yourself to be Jewish and observant. From a Jewish legal perspective, the fact that Chinese people eat lots of pork does not mean that they're going to Hell or something. Setting aside the fact that Hell isn't a doctrine in mainstream Jewish thought, the point is that there is no legal violation -- no crime -- in eating pork... unless you're an observant Jew. You go right ahead. Enjoy it! But observant Jews are not allowed to do this, and that has nothing whatsoever to do with you.

 

Now if you are going to participate in these debates, you need to understand them thoroughly. It's rather like going to law school, actually. If you haven't gone to law school to study the awesome intricacies of American tax law, for example, you don't really have any standing to say, "I think this particular tax clause is stupid." I mean, you can say whatever you want, but anyone with a clue is going to recognize that you're just shooting your mouth off.

 

So, unless you have studied Talmud very thoroughly and truly understand all the intricacies regarding how kashrut applies to metal utensils, your remarks regarding these legal conclusions are trivial nonsense. If you are not an observant Jew, they don't apply to you anyway.

 

How about we get back to talking about food and knives, and leave the mysteries of Talmud to people who know what they're talking about?

post #19 of 20

Well said, Chris.

 

In my humble opinion, it seems too many folks want to be 'experts' on things they have feelings about. But as granny used to say, Feelin's ain't facts..."

post #20 of 20
"How about we get back to talking about food and knives, and leave the mysteries of Talmud to people who know what they're talking about?"


"In my humble opinion, it seems too many folks want to be 'experts' on things they have feelings about. But as granny used to say, Feelin's ain't facts..."

Can we add "momma always said life is like a box of chocolates, and you never know what you are going to get"

Point being much as the discussion may have gotten a bit off track (the you never know what you are going to get part) but once you start taking a bite it's just not right to spit it out and hide.

No matter if you wish to gang up on or shut down bellsmoke etc. his comments are likely not unusual for those without knowledge of the various different "Jewish law" , and from appearance seem more of a result of the fact that if you don't understand it then it may not make sense to someone of modern times, and didn't seem intolerance related (to me at least, but what do I know lol)

And though I can agree with granny I will add that we all know what opinions are as well,and if we desire to see more well informed opinion then there will be a benefit to offering fair explanations that help others to better understand.

I can't see how that would fit into a low end knife discussion, but it sure isn't up to me to say either, but if there is going to be enough emotion to school one on something may as well do it in a way they may better understand, and possibly better respect if done without the appearance trying to make them look stupid.

And to keep this somewhat on topic I do like the cheapo Wasabi bread knife I have, and more so than the much more expensive Henckels I sold off, and since it was about a fifth of the cost I like it even more wink.gif

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply

 

"love my country" but "fear my government"  Something is just wrong with this

 

 

 

Looking for info on entry level J-knives? Need help on finding the most bang for your buck? Hope you enjoy learning from the info here, I know I did!

http://www.cheftalk.com/t/63213/tojiro-dp-f-809-240mm-g...

Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Knife Reviews